Environment

Longevity Welding Announces Availability of Some of the Best TIG...

PR Web - 1 hour 40 min ago

LONGEVITY knows the welding machine and the welder. Offering some of the most desired TIG welders the company prides itself on both DIY welding equipment and professional TIG models. The company...

(PRWeb September 01, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/tig-welders/longevitywelding/prweb12127858.htm

Categories: Environment

Portable One Now Offering Major Brand Custom Laptops at Cost-effective...

PR Web - 1 hour 40 min ago

Portable One now offers custom laptops from major brands at competitive prices. At Portable One, customers can find laptops from top manufacturers customized to suit their needs.

(PRWeb September 01, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/custom-laptops/PortableOne/prweb12127978.htm

Categories: Environment

Staggering Economy, Job Loss and Dwindling Incomes - OiGoi.com...

PR Web - 1 hour 40 min ago

OiGoi.com advises that there are several things a couple can do to help avoid arguments or a break-up during a time of financial adversity. Arguing is best left for large matters, arguing over trivial...

(PRWeb September 01, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12133706.htm

Categories: Environment

Why we really should care about boosting farm yields

Grist.org - 6 hours 21 min ago

Crystal-ball gazers looking for the future of food often start with this question: How the heck are humans going to grow enough food to feed our teaming masses without wrecking the planet?

There are two assumptions embedded in that question: first, that we’re going to have trouble growing enough food; and second, that we must race to keep food production up to speed with population growth, rather than reining in population growth. In questioning those assumptions over the last two weeks, my focus has shifted. If we want to prevent famine and ecological collapse, we should be thinking primarily about poverty, not food.

However, looking for ways to deal with poverty takes us right back around to increasing food production. If we fail to deal with poverty and hunger, Joel Cohen told me, we are (counterintuitively) consigning ourselves to explosive population growth. To make sure everyone gets a healthy portion of the world’s pie, he said, we’ll need a bigger pie (more food), fewer forks (level off population growth), and better manners (share more equitably). And while each of these approaches has its partisans, Cohen thinks we’ll almost certainly need all three.

As I found previously, if you can help small farmers grow more food, it’s a double whammy: It helps lift them out of poverty (better sharing) and gives us more food (bigger pie).

That means that we really do need to ask, how the heck we are going to feed ourselves? It’s not the main issue (poverty), but it’s an effective lever to work on that main issue. So we still need a contingent of farmers and scientists working on increasing yields. And that’s a problem, because for years countries around the world have been pulling money out of agricultural research.

“For almost thirty years, since the early 1980s, neither the private sector nor governments were interested in investing in agriculture,” wrote Olivier De Schutter, who recently concluded his stint as the UN Special Rapporteur on the right to food.

The amount of money that we invested in farming R&D has actually risen a tiny bit every year, but it’s so tiny that the amount has shrunk relative to the size of the farm economy — that is, the size of the investment wasn’t keeping up with the size of the job. Between 1990 and 2000, the world increased agricultural research investment by 1.9 percent a year. That’s about what you’d want for a cost of living increase — it doesn’t leave room for breaking new ground.

Agricultural Science and Technology Indicators – Global Assessment of Agricultural R&D SpendingBIC = Brazil, India, China – click to embiggen

“You need a certain minimum investment in agricultural science that continues year after year, because you don’t answer all the questions the first time, it’s a moving target,” said Melinda Smale, a professor of international development at Michigan State. “You need to invest in scientists, invest in institutions. Things like salaries have a recurring cost.”

When I suggested to Smale that some argue for spending money on one transformative technology that could be used everywhere, rather than pouring money into local institutions every year, she scoffed: “We should dispel this myth of the silver bullet. That’s just bullshit. What works in one place will not work in another. You cannot export a single uniform model.”

The Green Revolution — the modernization of agriculture that occurred between the ’40s and ’60s —  is often the poster child for the single uniform model. After all, Norman Borlaug, the father of the Green Revolution, was able to rapidly spread improved seeds around the world, instead of breeding strains to be adapted to local conditions. But the seeds were only part of the Green Revolution, Smale said. It also relied on tremendous investments from governments around the world to pay for wells, canals, and transportation systems to move harvests and fertilizers.

To build agricultural systems that are truly adapted to local environmental conditions, we’d need enough investment in agriculture to sustain various types of research, and farmer training institutions in each of those environments. The question of what that money should pay for (agroecology research? fertilizer?) is a contentious one, and I’ll get to that soon. But first: there was an increase in agricultural R&D after 2008, when food price spikes scared a modest amount of money out of leaders around the globe.

Were those price spikes a sign that we really we’re closer to running out of food than I’ve suggested here so far? I’ll try to answer that next.


Filed under: Article, Business & Technology, Food
Categories: Environment

Will I poison myself if I reuse this plastic water bottle?

Grist.org - 7 hours 37 min ago

Q. Is it OK to reuse the bottles that bottled water comes in? Sometimes when I am at a conference the bottled water they have is in a really sturdy bottle, and it seems like such a waste for it to be single use. But is it safe to refill it from the tap? My primary concern is BPA leaching into the water, but what about sanitation?

Thanks,
Rick C.
York, PA

A. Dearest Rick,

Skip it.

By now, I think the strikes against disposable plastic water bottles are pretty well-established: They’re made from petroleum, require energy to produce and ship, usually end up in the landfill, might leach chemicals into your drink, and can be used to club fuzzy baby seals (okay, I made that last one up). But equally entrenched are the reasons why they’re still so common: Namely, we all forgot our reusable bottles, and we’re thirsty.

So when we’re left with what looks like a perfectly clean empty bottle, many eco-minded folks think like you do, Rick: Wouldn’t refilling this be better than recycling it and grabbing another? Unfortunately, signs point to no.

You’re most concerned about BPA, so let’s start there. The story we’ve all heard by now concerns BPA in polycarbonate plastics (the ones with the #7 on the bottom), which are sometimes used in disposable plastic bottles. And there’s solid evidence to back this story up. One study found increased BPA levels in the urine of people who drank out of them for just a week. Another found that heating the bottles – as one would by washing them with hot water – accelerated the leaching. Longer-term use tends to lead to small scratches in the plastic as well, which also frees BPA to mingle in your drink.

So are you in the clear if the bottles at your conference sport a #1, for PET plastic (polyethylene terephthalate), instead? Not so fast. A 2010 study found that PET (probably the most common plastic used in throwaway bottles) may also leach endocrine-disrupting substances. It gets worse: Still another study discovered that pretty much every kind of plastic tested leached estrogenic chemicals – including the ones trumpeted as BPA-free.

And even if you didn’t care a whit about BPA, Rick, I’d still point you and your plastic bottle away from the tap. The bottles are moist, enclosed, and getting a lot of full-body contact with your hands and lips: In other words, they’re bacterial breeding grounds. A study of elementary-school kids’ water bottles detected high bug levels in almost two-thirds of samples. The situation gets worse with extended use, as bacteria love to hang out in the same scratches that leach chemicals. You’d need to wash your bottle out with soap (and probably a bottle brush) and air-dry it completely to vanquish the bugs, and we now know what happens when hot water meets plastic.

Will you face dire bodily consequences if you refill your water bottle once over the course of the day? I’m no doctor, but probably not. You will, however, be consuming a throwaway (recycle-away?) plastic when you could have sipped from a neverending fount of pure refreshment: a reusable bottle made from stainless steel or glass. Following the BYOB (bring your own bottle) philosophy also means you don’t have to worry about estrogenic anything sneaking into your water, which makes the practice pretty darn hard to beat.

All you have to do is remember to pack it: Store it in your briefcase, set a reminder on your phone, clip it to your pants – whatever it takes to get in the habit. And if you find yourself at another conference sans bottle? You can always get up and go for the fountain. Your legs could probably use a stretch anyway.

Of course, it would be even better if everyone at your conference did the same (I presume you’re not in the bottled-water business, Rick?). In a perfect world, organizers would plan for plastic-free events by providing glassware, selling reusable bottles on-site, or even soliciting a slew of donated bottles to pass out. You might want to put a bug in the ears of your next conference gurus on this subject. You’d be saving boatloads of plastic, and perhaps preventing a few intestinal infections along the way, too.

Steriley,
Umbra


Filed under: Food, Living
Categories: Environment

Why Top10BestSEOHosting.com Calls Them Great Web Hosting Suppliers

PR Web - 7 hours 40 min ago

After evaluating many web host suppliers carefully, Top10BestSEOHosting.com is here to announce that JustHost, Bluehost and GoDaddy are the best web hosting suppliers in 2014.

(PRWeb September 01, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12134208.htm

Categories: Environment

Septrainbow Raises The Bar On The Umbrella Industry In China

PR Web - 7 hours 40 min ago

Umbrellas Manufacturers in Fujian, China have a more efficient channel to export umbrellas to the worldwide markets. Septrainbow launched their strategic procurement with customers from all over the...

(PRWeb September 01, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/08/prweb12117624.htm

Categories: Environment

Four reasons that ice bucket challenge went crazy viral

Grist.org - 7 hours 49 min ago

At a certain point last week the knowledge that people I knew were dousing themselves with buckets of ice water became inescapable.

Other things that have gone viral this summer include #yesallwomen, a Kickstarter for potato salad, and a donation fund for a police officer who shot and killed an unarmed teenager. How they’ve done this is mysterious — while there are entire ad agencies devoted to “viral advertising” and you can pay your way into the “trending” section of Twitter these days, all of the above seemed to spread without any Machiavellian strategy behind them.

What made the ice bucket challenge stick, when so many other fundraisers and attention-getters haven’t?

A few theories.

1) Say my name

It doesn’t just work for Destiny’s Child! The fact that each person who posted an ice bucket video could call on three other people to take up the challenge turned it into, basically, a chain letter.

Chris Christie challenges Mark Zuckerberg!

Mark Zuckerberg challenges Bill Gates!

Bill Gates challenges Elon Musk and Ryan Seacrest!

And so forth….

2) Exploit social networks.

This is also the secret behind Mary Kay, Amway, and nearly every fundraising campaign on earth. We are social creatures, and we’re absolutely more likely to give to or volunteer for organizations that our friends are involved with already.

The fact that ice bucket challengers could challenge anyone — friend, foe or complete stranger — made it more amusing, but the way the phenomenon spread was through social networks. Facebook’s decision last December to set up video posts so that they played automatically made the whole social aspect of the ice bucket challenge even harder to ignore. Check Facebook and there it was in the background, everywhere — just as hard to ignore as those special people in your life when you encounter them in actual meatspace.

3) Keep it simple, stupid.

In general, fads with real sticking power (hula hooping, frisbee) don’t take much skill to master, while the ones that take real dedication (rollerblading, swing dancing) tend to flash and disappear.

There are very few actions that are more simple than dumping a bucket of ice water over your head. You don’t even have to hold your own bucket. If only the rest of life could be that easy.

In this sense, the ice bucket challenge has a lot in common with other ease-of-adoption do-gooder measures, like 350.org’s International Day of Climate Action (directions: Spell out “350” with something; take a picture of it) and Movember (directions: If you can, grow a mustache).

4) Allow room to get weird.

Part of the reason that the ice bucket challenge took off is that it’s already viral — people have been doing variants of this stunt for years, modifying it to suit their own purposes, before it acquired the perfect combination of qualities that made it go big.

Because it didn’t have a clear, set format, people improvised. Bill Gates designed an ice bucket dumping machine for his. Those concerned about drought turned it into the rice bucket challenge, the dirt bucket challenge, and so forth. Compare this to the very well-intentioned but also very rule-bound video campaign for Al Gore’s Climate Reality Project. I am sure Al’s lawyers made the Climate Reality Project put all that boilerplate in there, but still — it’s like reading a rental car agreement.

Earlier this month, the ALS Foundation moved to copyright the Ice Bucket Challenge. Whether or not it would have been able to is debatable, but it made the right choice when it ultimately withdrew the effort.  If there’s one thing a virus needs to survive, it’s the ability to keep changing.


Filed under: Article, Living
Categories: Environment

Pixel Film Studios Released a New Tutorial Entitled ProWorld Lesson...

PR Web - 10 hours 40 min ago

A new tutorial entitled ProWorld Lesson was released today from Pixel Film Studios. This tutorial includes a step-by-step guide to using the ProWorld Plugin for Final Cut Pro X

(PRWeb September 01, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/final-cut-pro-x-lesson/2014-08/prweb12116083.htm

Categories: Environment

Arizona Aquatic Gardens, the Nation’s Premiere Tropical Aquatic...

PR Web - 10 hours 40 min ago

America’s leading aquatic discount company unveils new site that includes better shipping options, updated product descriptions and information.

(PRWeb September 01, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/08/prweb12118216.htm

Categories: Environment

The Great Pacific Race, Adventure and Science on the Open Sea

PR Web - 10 hours 40 min ago

University of Hawaii, The Great Pacific Race and Project Kaisei collaborate on Fukushima disaster study.

(PRWeb September 01, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/08/prweb12128153.htm

Categories: Environment

Gooseneck Vineyards Announces Partnership with Save the Bay

PR Web - 10 hours 40 min ago

Gooseneck Vineyards to Make a Donation to Save the Bay for Every Bottle of Gooseneck Wine Purchased in Rhode Island

(PRWeb September 01, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12134343.htm

Categories: Environment

Team Rubicon Encourages Americans to Get Ready During National...

PR Web - 10 hours 40 min ago

NPM helps Americans take steps toward becoming prepared

(PRWeb August 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/preparednessmonth/teamrubicon/prweb12134939.htm

Categories: Environment

Tattoo Me Now Review Reveals Unique Ideas for Tattoo Designs

PR Web - 10 hours 40 min ago

DailyGossip.org reviews one of the most popular resources of tattoo designs. Tattoo Me Now reveals some unique ideas for tattoo designs.

(PRWeb August 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/Tattoo-Me-Now/Full-Review/prweb12134089.htm

Categories: Environment

High Quality Bamboo Veneers from Bambooindustry.com Receive...

PR Web - 13 hours 40 min ago

Recently, BambooIndustry.com, one of the most popular suppliers of bamboo products, has updated its website with a new selection of bamboo veneers. Additionally, it has deiced offer autumn discounts(...

(PRWeb August 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/08/prweb12131665.htm

Categories: Environment

FODAY Auto Announces Its Latest Designs To Worldwide Clients

PR Web - 13 hours 40 min ago

In order to celebrate the coming of autumn, Guangdong FODAY Automobile Co., LTD has announced its latest designs and launched a big promotion.

(PRWeb August 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/08/prweb12131771.htm

Categories: Environment

Delta Updates Its Wheel Loader Assortment With A Lot Of Cheap Used Cat...

PR Web - 13 hours 40 min ago

Recently, Delta has updated its wheel loader assortment with a lot of cheap used cat 966 loaders. All these items are guaranteed to be great.

(PRWeb August 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/08/prweb12132099.htm

Categories: Environment

NutriGold Highlights New Study on the Importance of Vitamin D to Our...

PR Web - 13 hours 40 min ago

University of California, San Diego researchers have found that people with Vitamin D blood levels lower than 50 ng/mL have a higher risk of premature death. The National Institute of Health...

(PRWeb August 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/08/prweb12134037.htm

Categories: Environment

NutriGold Supports the FDA's Call for an Updated Nutrition Facts...

PR Web - 13 hours 40 min ago

The FDA has recently proposed updates to the 20-year-old Nutrition Facts label that has the sugar industry writhing. NutriGold fully supports the new changes and believes they will help consumers make...

(PRWeb August 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/08/prweb12134093.htm

Categories: Environment

GoDaddy, IX Web Hosting and Bluehost Are Awarded As Hosting Experts by...

PR Web - 13 hours 40 min ago

Top10BestSEOHosting.com has recently compared many professional web hosting suppliers and announced that GoDaddy, IX Web Hosting and Bluehost are experts in the hosting industry.

(PRWeb August 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12134117.htm

Categories: Environment

Pages