Environment

Belize Commits to a 100 per cent Clean Energy Future

PR Web - 22 min 59 sec ago

The Lodge at Chaa Creek hailed Belize’s recent commitment to become fully powered by renewable energy, saying it shows that the small Caribbean country is serious about developing an environmentally...

(PRWeb June 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/06/prweb12817462.htm

Categories: Environment

Heartland Institute Experts React to Supreme Court Decision on EPA...

PR Web - 22 min 59 sec ago

Heartland Institute experts react to the Supreme Court decision against the Environmental Protection Agency’s rule to limit mercury emissions from coal- and oil-fired power plants, saying the agency...

(PRWeb June 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12820899.htm

Categories: Environment

Church of Scientology Seattle Celebrates World Environment Day With...

PR Web - 22 min 59 sec ago

Scientology Environmental Task Force acknowledged for 25 years of service.

(PRWeb June 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12821074.htm

Categories: Environment

National Association of Professional Women Inducts Renee Hunter, Owner...

PR Web - 22 min 59 sec ago

Renee Hunter selected for her outstanding leadership and commitment within her profession

(PRWeb June 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/napw/hrcalifornia/prweb12789010.htm

Categories: Environment

Intelligibility of New Mass Notification System for CFB Esquimalt...

PR Web - 22 min 59 sec ago

Acoustic Technology, Inc. (ATI Systems), worked with Delco Automation of Calgary Alberta, to supply Canadian Forces Base Esquimalt (CFB Esquimalt) with a new Mass Notification System (MNS) that was...

(PRWeb June 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12820033.htm

Categories: Environment

Extensive Solar Cost-Benefit Studies Now Highlighted on SEIA Website

PR Web - 3 hours 23 min ago

As a way to quickly access extensive research on the value of solar and renewable energy – from economic and environmental benefits to both consumers and businesses, to grid efficiencies and savings –...

(PRWeb June 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12820311.htm

Categories: Environment

Tel Aviv World Environment Day Forum Engages Diverse Communities in...

PR Web - 3 hours 23 min ago

Scientology Center of Tel Aviv hosts panel and open house in honor of World Environment Day 2015.

(PRWeb June 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12820744.htm

Categories: Environment

“True Detective” makes us wonder: Is Los Angeles totally unlovable?

Grist.org - Mon, 06/29/2015 - 23:58

In this installment of Green Screen, we highlight the greenest parts of your favorite TV guilty pleasures (spoiler: There are a lot of them!).

Why are we jumping in on the True Detective commentary train on the second episode of the second season, you ask? To be honest, I wasn’t quite sure that it wouldn’t be too much of a train wreck to bear sticking with for a whole season. And many people are firmly sticking to their preconceptions that this season of True Detective is a poorly cast, disastrously pale imitation of its antecedent. Those people, in my opinion, are going to be proven wrong — just like people who say they hate Los Angeles without ever having visited the city for longer than, like, the duration of a flight layover.

Which brings us to my point: The first season of True Detective was committed to creating characters so reprehensible and deeply fucked-up that you couldn’t help but love them, sort of. This season blesses us with a similarly unpleasant and morally bankrupt cast, and introduces a whole new specie of unpalatable character: Los Angeles itself.

The first two episodes are built on sweeping shots of endless urban sprawl, trails of crawling cars on beige highways, and more hazy industrial zones than you’d think would fit within the state of California. It looks like a pretty convincing dystopia — because, well, it’s real. The season’s plot is built on the corrupt incorporated city of Vinci: a tiny, gross pocket of Los Angeles County, home to 75 residents and a whole lot of toxic waste.

The tagline for Season 2, in case you were looking for a little more subtlety, is: “We Get The World We Deserve.” In other words: We built this horrific, carbon-belching, industrial quagmire, so we have to live in it. And even when we try to fix the mess we made, we get told to fuck off — cut to Colin Farrell’s character yelling in half-hearted Spanish to a group of kids to stop playing in a pool of industrial waste, and getting flicked off in return.

HBO

With every character as flat-eyed as the traffic they’re trapped in, True Detective really drives home how much the places we live in become part of us. The real question is: Can the show do what it did with Rust and Marty last season and make us appreciate the dirty, soulless character of L.A. for what it is? Check back with us next week to find out!


Filed under: Cities, Living
Categories: Environment

You should be excited about this SCOTUS decision, too

Grist.org - Mon, 06/29/2015 - 23:01

Amid big huzzahs for the Supreme Court ruling on gay marriage last week, there was another, less-heralded 5-4 vote that also deals a stiff blow to decades-old discriminatory practices: The court’s ruling on a Texas case involving housing discrimination.

On June 25, SCOTUS found that the Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs violated the Fair Housing Act of 1968. The court cited the legal concept known as “disparate impact” — the idea that policies can still be discriminatory (and therefore illegal) even if the discrimination is not intentional. Disparate impact is an important concept in civil rights law, since proving intentional discrimination is extremely difficult in court. Disparate impact, however, per the New York Times’ take on the news, “can be proved using statistics.”

As Brentin Mock pointed out in January, while this particular case specifically addresses housing discrimination — the plaintiffs argued that state officials were sanctioning too many subsidized housing developments in African-American neighborhoods, perpetuating the very segregation they were meant to address — its outcome has huge ripple effects on environmental justice, too. Zoning laws, which are typically responsible for the siting of hazardous waste facilities and other polluting industries, can be called up under the Fair Housing Act. And showing the disproportionate impacts of pollution on low-income communities of color in court is far easier, Brentin wrote, than proving “there was malice in the heart of the developer who placed the housing projects near the landfills.”

Still, bloggers and analysts maintain, the court undermined its own historic ruling by limiting the ways that the disparate impact claim can be used. According to Quartz, for instance:

Unfortunately, the court tempered its own ruling by limiting disparate-impact claims to cases where a law or policy raises “artificial, arbitrary, and unnecessary barriers.” That gives lower courts a lot of leeway in interpretation. And it said that purely statistical evidence of disparate impact isn’t enough; plaintiffs must also prove that a law or policy caused that impact, which will often be hard.

So, this is hardly the end of the road. But now that the nation’s highest court has finally, officially recognized disparate impact, it should be far more possible to address real injustices that do exist — regardless of whether anybody intended them to.


Filed under: Article, Politics
Categories: Environment

EcoFoil Earns Greener Product Certification

PR Web - Mon, 06/29/2015 - 22:48

Leading distributor of eco-friendly insulation products recognized for compliance with LEED, LEED for Homes and NAHB green building standards.

(PRWeb June 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12818565.htm

Categories: Environment

AWWA names Tracy Mehan Executive Director of Government Affairs

PR Web - Mon, 06/29/2015 - 22:48

American Water Works Association Chief Executive Officer David LaFrance today announced that water policy leader G. Tracy Mehan, III has been named AWWA’s Executive Director of Government Affairs.

(PRWeb June 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12819614.htm

Categories: Environment

GM wheat trial fails, but science wins anyway

Grist.org - Mon, 06/29/2015 - 20:50

Five years ago, scientists at Rothamsted Research in England began breeding wheat that could be grown using fewer pesticides. They ended up engineering the wheat to give off an aphid alarm pheromone to scare insects away — a trick borrowed from mint plants. The wheat worked like a charm in the lab, but the real test is always whether it works out in the world. And in field trials, according to recently published research, the wheat failed — it didn’t repel the aphids.

Still, Rothamsted scientists learned a lot from the project, as they noted in a press release:

Although the GM wheat did not repel aphids in the field, the five-year project did score some notable successes. The use of genetic engineering to provide wheat able to produce the aphid alarm pheromone (E)-β-farnesene (Eβf) was successful and robust – this is a world first and an important proof of concept in plant science overall. GM wheat plants produced the pheromone in significant quantities without major unexpected changes seen in the appearance or performance of the new wheat plants, which looked and yielded as normal.

The researchers think they may be dealing with a boy-who-cried-wolf problem:

Rothamsted scientists think that the aphids may simply have become habituated to the constant production of the alarm pheromone – this might be akin to people ignoring a car alarm that never stops ringing. This opens up the prospect for further scientific work at Rothamsted to try to better mimic the production of the pheromone in nature.

As Professor John Pickett, FRS and Michael Elliott Fellow at Rothamsted Research said: “The research project overall provided us with fascinating results. We now know that in order to repel natural aphid populations in the field, we may need to alter the timing of release of the alarm signal from the plant to mimic more closely that by the aphid, which is a burst of release in response to a threat rather than continuous.”

This engineered wheat lacks many of the characteristics that bother people about GMOs. It was meant to reduce insecticide use rather than enable plants to survive heavy spraying. And instead of being manufactured by a private biotech corporation, the research was done at a public institution by taxpayer-funded scientists.

Still, the project was controversial, and anti-GMO activists protested the use of public money on genetic engineering. It actually cost Rothamsted more money to protect the field trial from activists than to do the science itself:

Total costs for the research project were £732,000.00. Additionally, £444,000 was invested in fencing to use in this and future research trials. The fencing protects the site from intruders as well as preventing wild animals from entering the trial site. An additional £1,794,439 was provided by the BBSRC for security measures in response to threats of vandalism and attempted criminal damage by anti-GM activists.

Some activists say that the money was wasted. But this kind of failure is a crucial part of science. The real world constantly confounds expectations and exposes the assumptions of researchers. This is what makes science so cool: It defies expectations. Negative results are important — in fact, it’s when you don’t see them that you need to be most on your guard for pseudoscience.


Filed under: Article, Business & Technology, Food, Science
Categories: Environment

The Dalai Lama calls for swift climate action and pals around with Patti Smith

Grist.org - Mon, 06/29/2015 - 20:14

Glastonbury music festival-goers got one hell of a treat this past weekend – and I’m not just talking about kickass female artists Mary J. Blige, Florence + the Machine, or even Patti freakin’ Smith.

The Dalai Lama, renowned Tibetan spiritual leader, joined a panel to discuss climate change before crowds of sweaty music enthusiasts in England. During the talk, he discussed nuclear disarmament, Pope Francis’ climate change encyclical, and the responsibility of world powers (including the United States and Russia) to stop burning fossil fuels. The Guardian has the details:

[The Dalai Lama] said: “The concept of war is outdated, but we do need to fight. Countries think about their own national interest rather than global interests and that needs to change because the environment is a global issue.

“It is not sufficient to just express views, we must set a timetable for change in the next two to four years.”

The Dalai Lama said individuals also had their own responsibility towards the planet. Speaking about his own efforts, he said he always turned the lights off when leaving rooms and took showers instead of baths – though he admitted taking two showers a day.

Well, it is good to know that despite his dedication to eco-consciousness, he’s still has at least one small indulgence. And after spending a day at a music festival, who could really blame him for that second shower?

But he didn’t just stick around for the climate change panel. Music legend Patti Smith later brought the Dalai Lama onstage where she presented him with an 80th birthday cake, read him a handwritten poem, and led her audience into singing him “Happy Birthday.” You can watch the celebration in the video below.

After blowing out the candles, the Dalai Lama said he was thrilled to see so many young people at the festival.

Speaking to Smith and her fellow musicians on stage, the Dalai Lama said: “Most of you have white hair – but the voice and the physical action looks very youthful. So that gives me encouragement myself. I’m now 80, but I should be more active like you.”

Aww.


Filed under: Article, Climate & Energy, Living
Categories: Environment

Bringing Up Baby...Millenials Should Check World Patent...

PR Web - Mon, 06/29/2015 - 19:48

The New York Inventor Exchange approves Fresh Plus Diaper for licensing and trading intellectual property rights.

(PRWeb June 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/worldpatentmarketing/baby-invention/prweb12816782.htm

Categories: Environment

Bhakti Chai Launches Online Giving Platform, "G.I.T.A."...

PR Web - Mon, 06/29/2015 - 19:48

History Of Giving Back The Basis For “Give”, “Inspire”, “Take Action” Website

(PRWeb June 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/GITA/Giving/prweb12808032.htm

Categories: Environment

IREM and Rocky Mountain Institute Release New Sustainability and...

PR Web - Mon, 06/29/2015 - 19:48

Online course series empowers professionals to incorporate all of the value elements of deep retrofits into their decision making

(PRWeb June 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/06/prweb12816904.htm

Categories: Environment

Picturing the forecast: National Weather Service Graphics Developed...

PR Web - Mon, 06/29/2015 - 19:48

The National Weather Service this summer is introducing new online forecasts based on research by a team of risk communication experts at NCAR. The new graphics will better communicate local forecasts...

(PRWeb June 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12818579.htm

Categories: Environment

SAE International to Hold First Additive Manufacturing Committee...

PR Web - Mon, 06/29/2015 - 19:48

SAE International invites aerospace engineering professionals to participate in the initial meeting of the Additive Manufacturing Committee, which will be held July 21-22 at the DoubleTree by Hilton...

(PRWeb June 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12818681.htm

Categories: Environment

Upcoming Conference Takes Aim at Invasive Aquatic Plants

PR Web - Mon, 06/29/2015 - 19:48

The Weed Science Society of America will participate in the upcoming 55th annual meeting of the Aquatic Plant Management Society scheduled for July 12-15 in Myrtle Beach, S.C. Dozens of conference...

(PRWeb June 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12818721.htm

Categories: Environment

Humans really are unprecedented in Earth’s geological history — and that’s a bad thing

Grist.org - Mon, 06/29/2015 - 19:40

There’s no doubt that a) humans have messed up the planet big time and b) our ability to maintain our sanity while barreling toward an uncertain and potentially catastrophic future is perhaps our greatest achievement of all time. But in a new study from the latest issue of The Anthropocene Review, researchers explain just how much we’ve f-ed up this beautiful world.

“We think of major changes to the biosphere as the big extinction events, like that which finished off the dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous Period. But the changes happening to the biosphere today may be much more significant,” Mark Williams, a geologist from the University of Leicester and leader of the study, said in a press release.

Indeed, Williams and his colleagues claim that not since the evolution of photosynthetic microbes or multicellular animals has the course of Earth’s ecosystem changed so much. Scientists already acknowledge that we’ve entered a new human-induced geological epoch called the Anthropocene (although they disagree on when it began).

“But what is really new about this chapter in Earth history, the one we’re living through?” Williams says in the press release. “Episodes of global warming, ocean acidification and mass extinction have all happened before, well before humans arrived on the planet. We wanted to see if there was something different about what is happening now.”

Here are the four key changes from the press release, that they say define this unprecedented time in Earth’s history:

  • The homogenisation of species around the world through mass, human-instigated species invasions — nothing on this global scale has happened before

  • One species, Homo sapiens, is now in effect the top predator on land and in the sea, and has commandeered for its use over a quarter of global biological productivity.  There has never been a single species of such reach and power previously

  • There is growing direction of evolution of other species by Homo sapiens

  • There is growing interaction of the biosphere with the ‘technosphere’ — a concept pioneered by one of the team members, Professor Peter Haff of Duke University — the sum total of all human-made manufactured machines and objects, and the systems that control them

On the plus side, if humanity is headed for demise, at least we’re going out with a bang — like that drunk guy who gets tossed out of the bar and triumphantly knocks down every chair on his way to the door.


Filed under: Climate & Energy, Science
Categories: Environment

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