Environment

Larson Electronics Releases a Class 1 Division 2 Four Foot, Four Lamp...

PR Web - 20 min 36 sec ago

With over 40 years as a leader in the industrial and commercial lighting industry Larson Electronics continues its commitment to providing high-grade lighting equipment to specialty markets with the...

(PRWeb July 25, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/larsonelectronics/explosionprooflights/prweb12043315.htm

Categories: Environment

Sapphire Technology Market Estimated to Reach $3.01 Billion by 2020 –...

PR Web - 20 min 36 sec ago

Sapphire Technology Market report provides detailed description of the devices such as power semiconductor market, power IC market, and Opto-Semiconductor market.

(PRWeb July 25, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/sapphire-technology/market/prweb12018800.htm

Categories: Environment

Melondipity Now Offers New Range of Baby Sun Hats For Girls

PR Web - 20 min 36 sec ago

Being the most trusted online portal for baby hats and other baby accessories, Melondipity further reinforces their position in this gamut by presenting a new range of baby sun hats for girls.

(PRWeb July 25, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/melondipitycom/sun-hats-girls/prweb12031299.htm

Categories: Environment

Wireless Gigabit (WiGig) Market Projected to $10.53 Billion by 2019 -...

PR Web - 20 min 36 sec ago

Wireless Gigabit (WiGig) Market research report majorly focuses on quantitative (market size and market growth), qualitative (trends, analysis, and insights), drivers, restraints, and opportunities in...

(PRWeb July 25, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/wigig-market/07/prweb12039978.htm

Categories: Environment

Vegetable Farming in Canada Industry Market Research Report from...

PR Web - 20 min 36 sec ago

Demand for industry products has been supported by a growing awareness of the health benefits associated with vegetable consumption, as well as expanding per capita disposable income. For this reason,...

(PRWeb July 25, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12045822.htm

Categories: Environment

A Boat Owner's Dream - A Mussel-Free Slip Courtesy of 060Bio, LLC

PR Web - 20 min 36 sec ago

Marina owners and boat owners can now enjoy a Zebra and Quagga Mussel-free zone around their docks and slips using the new Dock Disk ™.

(PRWeb July 25, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12046609.htm

Categories: Environment

Renown Environmental Engineering Firm, Terra-Petra, Approved as...

PR Web - 20 min 36 sec ago

National environmental engineering firm, Terra-Petra, has recently announced its status as an approved provider for the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Continuing Education System.

(PRWeb July 25, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/terra-petra-aia-ces/2014/prweb12046928.htm

Categories: Environment

Europe Alpha Olefins Market is Expected to Reach $1,958 Million in...

PR Web - 20 min 36 sec ago

The Europe Alpha Olefin Market report estimates the size of the Alpha Olefin market both in terms of volume and value....

(PRWeb July 25, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/alpha-olefins/market/prweb12047321.htm

Categories: Environment

North America Artificial Lift Services Market is Expected to Reach $7...

PR Web - 20 min 36 sec ago

The North America Artificial lift market report defines and segments the artificial lift market in North America with analysis and forecast of revenue....

(PRWeb July 25, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/artificial-lift/market/prweb12047372.htm

Categories: Environment

Europe Cyber Security Market is Expected to Reach $19 billion in 2019...

PR Web - 20 min 36 sec ago

The Europe Cyber Security report defines and segments the cyber security solutions market in Europe with analysis and forecast of revenue....

(PRWeb July 25, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/cyber-security/market/prweb12047388.htm

Categories: Environment

Pelican Water Announces Launch of New Countertop Water Filtration...

PR Web - 3 hours 20 min ago

Pelican Water is pleased to officially announce the launch of its new Premium Drinking Water System, a unique countertop filtration system perfect for apartments and condominium residents who want...

(PRWeb July 25, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12038754.htm

Categories: Environment

Order Mustang Billet Grilles With No Shipping Fees

PR Web - 3 hours 20 min ago

Action Automotive is now offering Mustang Billet Grilles with zero shipping fees at http://www.actionautoaccessories.com.

(PRWeb July 25, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/action-auto/billet-5150-7-25/prweb12047069.htm

Categories: Environment

Famous Supplier Stwd.co.uk Announces Its New Selection of Evening...

PR Web - 3 hours 20 min ago

Stwd.co.uk, one of the leading dress manufacturers and retailers, has announced its new collection of cheap evening dress for women. In addition, the reliable supplier has decided to launch a big...

(PRWeb July 25, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12047134.htm

Categories: Environment

2014 Refinery Outlook: High Refining Utilization in U.S. and New...

PR Web - 3 hours 20 min ago

Market Resarch Reports.Biz include new market research report, "High refining utilization in U.S. and new capacity in Middle East drive higher refining runs in 2014: Industry Analysis, Size,...

(PRWeb July 25, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12047156.htm

Categories: Environment

Useful SMA Jack Edge Mounts at Affordable Prices Provided by China...

PR Web - 3 hours 20 min ago

Recently, LenoRF, a well-known electrical equipment supplier, has announced its latest assortment of SMA Jack Edge Mounts. Moreover, the company has launched a special offer on these great...

(PRWeb July 25, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12047179.htm

Categories: Environment

Capacity and Capital Expenditure Outlook for Refineries in the Middle...

PR Web - 3 hours 20 min ago

Market Resarch Reports.Biz include new market research report" Middle East - Saudi Arabia And Iraq Capacity And Capital Expenditure Outlook For Refineries: Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth,...

(PRWeb July 25, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12047186.htm

Categories: Environment

Keyframe-Entertainment, Federation of Earth, and House of Film...

PR Web - 3 hours 20 min ago

Directed by Andrew Johner and distributed by House of Film, “Electronic Awakening,” the ethnographic documentary film about the spirituality of Electronic music, is now available on VOD at Cineqliq.

(PRWeb July 25, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/Electronic/Awakening/prweb12028638.htm

Categories: Environment

Organic Mattress Manufacturer Celebrates 38 Years Of Being In Business

PR Web - 3 hours 20 min ago

http://www.TheFutonShop.com celebrates 38 years of being in business with their Anniversary sale.

(PRWeb July 25, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/futon_sale/the_futon_shop/prweb12046801.htm

Categories: Environment

Amory Lovins’ high-tech home skimps on energy but not on comfort

Grist.org - 4 hours 52 min ago
© Judy Hill Lovins

For most of its history, environmentalism has been associated with a back-to-the-land lifestyle: being one with nature, living in the woods, wearing sandals, maybe driving a Volkswagen. Over the last decade, a counter-narrative has taken over. Cities are in. As climate change has become the dominant environmental issue, a low-carbon lifestyle has become the priority. Denser living is heralded for its energy efficiency, as are walking, biking and taking transit instead of driving.

All other things being equal, walkable urbanism beats sprawl. But one house in Old Snowmass, Colo., demonstrates that, with the right design, rural living can be about as low-carbon as possible. And it turns out those hippies were on to something: the secrets to low-impact rural housing lie in embracing nature instead of combatting it. Plus it helps to have some bleeding-edge technology.

Amory Lovins, the owner of the house, is exactly the guy you’d expect to live here. A bespectacled physicist and world-renowned energy-efficiency expert, he cofounded the Rocky Mountain Institute in 1982 with his then-wife L. Hunter Lovins. They chose this location, nestled up in the mountains 14 miles from Aspen, for RMI’s first headquarters, which they built as a model of energy efficiency. The original structure was completed in 1984. Today, RMI has expanded into other buildings, but Lovins still lives in the original house, which got a high-tech makeover in 2009.

© Judy Hill LovinsAmory Lovins with his bananas.

Lovins instructs visitors to drink water, because the house’s high elevation, around 8,000 feet, causes dehydration, and he throws on a goofy fisherman’s hat to protect his bald head when going outside. He calls his home “the Banana Farm,” after the tropical fruits grown in its greenhouse.

Many suburbanites have rejected the housing styles best suited to their specific environments, instead embracing a generic image of the American Dream that is often regionally inappropriate. Picture green lawns baking in the Arizona desert. The Banana Farm, however, adopts the classic adobe style indigenous to the Mountain West.

The primary challenge to building a super-efficient home in the mountains is heating. It can get very cold on winter nights in Old Snowmass, as low as -30 Fahrenheit. Heating a home here is an energy-intensive, and expensive, proposition. And so Lovins’ single biggest insight was to design it with walls so thick that it didn’t require heating.

© Judy Hill Lovins

In an arid mountainous area, the sun is strong during the day. So the 16-inch thick walls — made of concrete, locally harvested sandstone, and a middle four inches of polyurethane — are adept at storing heat throughout the day and retaining it overnight. Typically, an architect would recommend increasing the wall thickness until the point where the marginal savings on heating are passed by the increased costs of building. But Lovins went twice as thick, thereby eliminating the need to build a heating system at all. “We saved $1,100, and that’s just on the building, never mind operating the heating,” Lovins boasts.

Windows are a major source of air leakage, so the building has “super-windows,” which have microscopically thin layers of gases such as krypton and xenon that let in light but prevent heat exchange. “It’s equal to 16 layers of glass but it uses only two layers and costs less than three,” says Lovins.

Keeping rooms warm is not the only purpose for which most houses require oil or natural gas. To make a “combustion-free” house, Lovins had to solve a few other problems such as drying clothes and heating water. The answer is to harness the sun’s natural heating power. Although they have a dryer, Lovins and his current wife Judy usually hang their clothes on a line that can be raised by pulley up into a skylight and dried in the sunlight. They heat water through eight thermal solar panels and send it around the house through pipes that are extra wide and turn at gentle angles to minimize the electricity needed to move it.

The house’s electricity is all renewable. Massive solar panels adorn the roof, carport, and grounds alongside the building. The panels produce far more solar power during the day than the Lovinses use, so they sell electricity to the grid during the day and buy wind energy from the grid at night. They also store the solar power in batteries so that they could be fully self-sufficient in a blackout. The batteries would run down at night but be recharged during the day. “In February 2013, there were five power failures [in the area], and we never lost power,” says Lovins.

Super-efficient appliances are another reason that the house uses less than half the electricity of most comparable-sized homes. The dishwasher, from Swedish company Asko, has sensors that measure the cleanliness of the water coming out and stop washing when the water is clean, instead of continuing to run for another hour. The result is that it uses two-thirds of the water and electricity of a typical dishwasher. The fridge and freezer are also designed to save more energy than typical models. The compressor, which gives off heat, is located at the top rather than the bottom, so that as the heat rises it goes away and does not necessitate more cooling. The electric stove comes with specially designed copper pots that retain heat and can boil water at an incredible speed. The lights are all LED, and track lighting helps distribute light more efficiently around the large living room.

The main trick, though, is not using more advanced technology, but using the oldest one available. In the middle of the building, between the living area and the office, is a greenhouse. A wide section of roof over it is glass, allowing sunlight and heat to pour in, helping to reduce the need for lighting. “You basically don’t turn the lights on during the daytime,” says Lovins. The building’s rounded walls distribute the light more effectively than a typical house full of right angles.

© Judy Hill Lovins

Lovins grows tropical fruit in the greenhouse, not just the eponymous bananas but mangos and even coffee. The plants consume CO2 and release humidity. They also store heat. The greenhouse also features a pond, which adds ambient noise, a nice feature because such a tightly constructed and mechanical-free house might otherwise be eerily quiet.

Even the bathroom contains oddball innovations, such as a sink on top of the toilet tank, so that when you flush the toilet you can wash your hands in the water that will then refill the tank. (This apparently is common in Japan because space there is at such a premium and it saves the need for a separate sink.)

Lovins drives an electric car and charges it with solar power. Of course, he’d be an even greater net clean energy contributor if he didn’t need a car at all, much less his second one for long trips that exceed the electric car’s range. But the Lovinses manage to live a lifestyle that is remarkably low-impact without being abstemious. They even have a solar-heated hot tub.

Looking out at the stunning mountain views they enjoy from the hot tub, it’s understandable why they wouldn’t want to trade in their 4,000-square-foot house for a cramped urban apartment. And thanks to smart design, they don’t have to.

© Judy Hill Lovins
Filed under: Article, Climate & Energy, Living
Categories: Environment

On climate change, Republicans are even more backward than oil companies

Grist.org - 4 hours 59 min ago

Ask your average liberal or environmentalist to name the primary impediment to action on climate change, and the response will probably be: “Easy. It’s the fossil fuel industry.”

It’s not that easy, however. The fossil fuel companies are actually more accepting of climate reality than virtually every Republican in Congress.

That’s the conclusion I came to after watching a presentation by Cho-Oon Khong, chief political analyst at the Shell Oil company at the Aspen Ideas Festival last month. Khong called a temperature increase of 2 degrees Celsius “the flu,” leading to heat waves, sea level rise, and 10 to 20 percent less arable land. “But the worst effects are beyond that limit, when you start to see feedback loops,” he warned.

Accepting the 2 degree Celsius target is the same thing as accepting the recommendations of the global scientific community. Khong laid out possible world energy portfolios for keeping warming to two degrees. None would thrill environmentalists, as they rely to varying degrees on increases in nuclear energy, natural gas, and the deployment of carbon capture and sequestration (CCS). But he nonetheless acknowledged that we needed to change our ways.

“We have to talk about using any fossil fuel more efficiently, and CCS,” he said. Afterwards, he told Grist, “I think it would be foolish to dispute the science [of climate change].”

Shell was a sponsor of Aspen Ideas, and Khong’s speech — given in the Booz Allen Hamilton room of the Koch building — would be dismissed by any skeptical observer as corporate greenwashing. In 2009, Shell dropped its investments in solar, wind, and hydropower.

But Republicans don’t even bother with greenwashing. Not a single Republican member of Congress, with the exception of Rep. Michael Grimm who represents a swing district in New York City badly damaged by Hurricane Sandy, fully accepts the scientific consensus that global warming is happening and it is caused by greenhouse gas emissions.

Shell is hardly the only oil company that admits that emissions from the fuels they produce is causing the planet’s average temperature to rise. Just take a look at their websites.

ExxonMobbil, the largest and most intransigent of the American oil giants, “believes that it is prudent to develop and implement strategies that address the risks to society associated with increasing GHG emissions.”

Exxon avoids discussing climate science directly, but it implicitly accepts it by acknowledging the “risks” of greenhouse gases and the desirability of reducing them. It tries to counter that with a lot of talk about the value of energy to economic growth and some fear-mongering about the costs of regulating carbon. Nonetheless, it says, “Industry and governments should pursue an integrated set of solutions that include developing new energy supplies, increasing efficiency, and advancing energy technologies.”

Chevron, the next-largest, claims to “recognize and share the concerns of governments and the public about climate change.” The very next sentence states: “The use of fossil fuels to meet the world’s energy needs is a contributor to an increase in greenhouse gases (GHGs) — mainly carbon dioxide (CO2 ) — in the Earth’s atmosphere.”

This would seem to be a straightforward admission of the role of GHGs in global warming, although a careful reading reveals that the company does not directly acknowledge that GHGs cause warmer global average temperatures. Like Exxon, Chevron talks a lot about the economic need for lots of energy from fossil fuels for the foreseeable future. Even so, the company’s site says, “We are also committed to improving our energy efficiency and researching how to deliver volumes of alternative fuels at scale in the future.”

BP is the most forthright of the major oil companies. Its climate change page opens with bracing honesty: “According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), warming of the climate system is unequivocal, and is in large part due to an increase in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from human activity.”

Critics contend that even BP, in rebranding itself “Beyond Petroleum,” is doing little more than greenwashing. Even so, these statements are all to the left of the GOP on climate and energy.

Take a look at the Republican Party’s 2012 platform. Climate change and global warming are not mentioned, and the only reference to greenhouse gases is the following statement opposing their regulation under the Clean Air Act: “We also call on Congress to take quick action to prohibit the EPA from moving forward with new greenhouse gas regulations that will harm the nation’s economy and threaten millions of jobs over the next quarter century.”

The document is filled with demands for more fossil fuel development without mention of any environmental impact. Here’s the statement of overarching principle: “Our common theme is to promote development of all forms of energy, enable consumer choice to keep energy costs low, and ensure that America remains competitive in the global marketplace. We will respect the States’ proven ability to regulate the use of hydraulic fracturing, continue development of oil and gas resources in places like the Bakken formation and Marcellus Shale, and review the environmental laws that often thwart new energy exploration and production.”

Every likely 2016 Republican presidential contender expresses uncertainty at best about climate science. And congressional Republicans have made it clear that reducing fossil fuel consumption through efficiency or expansion of renewables is of no interest to them. They recently killed a bill that would have helped the private sector with voluntary efficiency improvements because it did not include approval of the Keystone XL pipeline. They are also turning against the wind energy production tax credit, even as fossil fuels drain billions of dollars from the federal Treasury in tax subsidies.

It is probably no coincidence that Shell and BP, being European, are less backwards about climate science than their American counterparts. A similar disparity exists politically, with the major European conservative parties being more enlightened than Republicans. But even American oil companies are clearly to the left of Republicans on climate.

It turns out you actually can be more Catholic than the Pope.

It makes sense when you consider the changes in the GOP since 2008, when its presidential ticket supported cap-and-trade. First, the Tea Party wave has swept in a cohort of Republicans who are genuine believers in their anti-environmental platform. With ideology as their motivation, rather than mere economic self-interest, there is no limit to their hostility to addressing climate change. This is why ideologically extreme right-wing foundations have replaced Exxon as the leading funders of climate denial.

All the studies in the world showing that the cost of catastrophic climate change is higher than the cost of regulating greenhouse gases won’t change their mind, because they aren’t interested in cost-benefit analysis. They view regulations as immoral infringements on freedom. Claiming they will cost money is just a convenient argument.

You also see a difference between the constituencies that oil companies and Republican politicians must respond to. Republican candidates and officeholders must appease right wing Republican primary voters, grassroots activists, and donors. For those groups, refusing to accept climate science or even voluntary efforts to reduce energy consumption or carbon emissions is a matter of tribal identity politics. Prius owners are liberals, so Priuses are offensive to their eyes, and the underlying premise that spewing CO2 out of your tailpipe isn’t good for the Earth must also be false.

Oil companies actually have a broader constituency than Republicans do. Not everyone who buys stock in an oil company or fills up his gas tank votes Republican. To keep activist investors at bay, ward off efforts to divest university endowments from fossil fuels, and keep a friendly face on their gas stations, it behooves Exxon and others to at least pretend to care about the environment. Pretending to care requires admitting that the CO2 you emit is contributing to climate change.

Of course, oil companies have been known to say one thing directly to the public and another through dark money donations to climate-denying advocacy groups. But Exxon, which gave heavily to those groups between 2003 and 2007, hasn’t done so — at least through a publicly traceable donation — since 2008.

That would be encouraging, were it not for the fact that the people with the real power to do something about climate change — the ones controlling the House of Representatives — were also coming around to reality.


Filed under: Business & Technology, Climate & Energy, Politics
Categories: Environment

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