Environment

Nationally Recognized Authors and Experts to Join The Journey Through...

PR Web - 5 min 19 sec ago

World renown photographer Kenneth Garrett, nationally-recognized filmmaker Ron Maxwell, farmer Forrest Pritchard, and permaculture expert Michael Judd will be at the Journey Through Hallowed Ground...

(PRWeb September 29, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12197481.htm

Categories: Environment

Customers Can Get $10 Discount Coupons For Christmas When Ordering...

PR Web - 5 min 19 sec ago

CuteBobble.com, an experienced supplier that provides many kinds of funny figurines, has recently announced its new collection of custom bobbleheads for Christmas. All the company’s old and new...

(PRWeb September 29, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12205803.htm

Categories: Environment

RF System Lab to Attend NBAA, the Fourth Largest Trade Show in the USA

PR Web - 5 min 19 sec ago

On October 21-23, this year’s NBAA is going to be taking place at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, FL -- RF System Lab will be exhibiting at booth #4525 and is providing free demos of...

(PRWeb September 29, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/10/prweb12207963.htm

Categories: Environment

Global Ocean Health Scores 67 out of 100

PR Web - 5 min 19 sec ago

Annual Ocean Health Index Report also Assessed the Antarctic and High Seas Oceans for the First Time, Critical Regions for Maintaining a Healthy Climate, Safeguarding Biodiversity and Providing...

(PRWeb September 29, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/10/prweb12208078.htm

Categories: Environment

Walttools Releases 3 All New Tru Tex Slate Step Inserts

PR Web - 5 min 19 sec ago

Walttools, a U.S. manufacturer and distributor of professional grade decorative concrete tools and supplies, just added to their successful form line by releasing three new step liners based on, one...

(PRWeb September 29, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/10/prweb12209994.htm

Categories: Environment

LPGtrade Awards Night – Latest Highlight at 9th LPG Trade Summit in...

PR Web - 5 min 19 sec ago

For the first time ever, CMT’s 9th LPG Trade Summit will feature a special awards night when it opens in Dubai on 11-13 November, 2014, where veterans join in discussions pertaining to global LPG...

(PRWeb September 29, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12188080.htm

Categories: Environment

Top10BestSEOHosting.com: New Reviews for Linux Web Hosting Suppliers...

PR Web - 3 hours 5 min ago

Top10BestSEOHosting.com has recently compared many Linux hosting suppliers and announced that GoDaddy and Bluehost are the most recommended suppliers for webmasters.

(PRWeb September 29, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12205669.htm

Categories: Environment

Top 10 Best SEO Hosting Recommends GreenGeeks, Justhost And iPage To...

PR Web - 3 hours 5 min ago

Recently, Top 10 Best SEO Hosting (Top10BestSEOHosting.com) has announced that GreenGeeks, Justhost and iPage are the most recommended PHP hosting suppliers in the market.

(PRWeb September 29, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12205780.htm

Categories: Environment

Fecbek: What are Men's Handbags?

PR Web - 3 hours 5 min ago

Today, Fecbek, a leading online supplier of fashion accessories, has released its new collections of men’s handbags. The new items are fashionable.

(PRWeb September 29, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12206008.htm

Categories: Environment

Cities are lapping countries on climate action

Grist.org - 5 hours 29 min ago

National governments — especially the American government — are largely paralyzed on climate change. But one message from the U.N. Climate Summit and surrounding events last week was that cities can do a lot to reduce greenhouse gas emissions on their own. They account for most of the world’s population and emissions. And cities, not beholden to rural, fossil-fuel dependent constituencies, often have more political freedom than national governments to address climate change.

The world’s largest cities are forming organizations to coordinate their efforts and learn from one another. In 2005, the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group formed. Despite the name, there are now 69 affiliated cities from more than 40 countries, accounting for a twelfth of the world’s population. There are 12 member cities in the U.S. Mostly, these are green enclaves like Portland, New York, Chicago, San Francisco, and Seattle. But C40 also includes sprawling Los Angeles and Houston, the country’s second- and fourth-largest cities.

While in New York for the Climate Summit, the mayors of L.A., Houston, and Philadelphia announced a “Mayors’ National Climate Action Agenda,” to set targets in their cities for emissions reductions, and to create or update climate action plans. They are also going to look for ways of offsetting emissions, like tree planting and capturing methane emissions from landfills, and they are going to encourage other mayors to sign on to the initiative. According to Houston Mayor Annise Parker (D), her city has already reduced its greenhouse gas emissions 32 percent since 2007.

In 2009, the percentage of humanity living in urbanized areas surpassed the percentage living in rural areas. Currently 54 percent of people live in cities, and the figure keeps growing. Cities account for around 60 percent of global GDP, 70 percent of greenhouse gas emissions, and 80 percent of the increase in emissions last year. As Roland Busch, global CEO of the infrastructure and cities sector of Siemens, which is sort of like Germany’s General Electric, said before the C40 annual awards dinner in New York last week, “If you want to fight climate change, cities is where the battle must be won.”

Globally, cities consume more energy per capita than rural areas. This may seem counterintuitive to an American who associates urban density with energy efficiency. But North America and Europe, where economies have long since industrialized, are atypical. In these regions, urbanization occurred long ago, and rural and suburban lifestyles cause higher emissions than urban ones, because they usually involve larger homes and more driving.

In the developing world, the alternative to urban living is often subsistence farming. So city-dwellers have higher emissions per capita because they are wealthier, with greater access to electricity and the conveniences it brings. In Africa, Asia, and Latin America, cities represent a growing share of population, economic activity, and emissions. (It’s worth noting, though, that while cities in developing countries have higher emissions than neighboring rural areas, they have lower emissions per dollar of GDP, and also urbanization tends to correspond with declining birth rates.) While most C40 cities are in developed countries, the group is actively recruiting new members in the developing world, and growing mega-cities like Shenzhen, Mumbai, Mexico City, and Beijing have joined.

According to a report by C40 released on Tuesday, cities can dramatically reduce their emissions by adopting policies that are within their authority. C40 estimates that by 2030, cities could achieve 10 percent of the global emissions reductions needed to close the gap between our current trajectory and what we need to stay below 2 degrees Celsius in warming, and by 2050 that figure could increase to 15 percent.

This would be achieved through three action areas: green building codes, transportation, and waste management. By adopting the most rigorous building codes, cities could cut their building energy usage by 30 percent. (The savings would actually be higher for each new building, but many buildings are already built, so that would be the average.) Cities could dramatically reduce their transportation emissions through switching to electric public vehicles and buses and reducing driving itself through smart urban planning and expanded mass transit. And, because garbage creates methane when decomposing, cities can reduce their emissions by increasing recycling and putting methane-collection systems in landfills.

Mayors of C40 cities are already pursuing many of the policies recommended in the report. As Rio de Janeiro Mayor Eduardo Paes, the chair of C40, noted at a press conference in New York last week, more than half of C40 cities now have bus rapid transit lines. Rio has more than 150 miles of BRT lines, which Paes predicts will help to dramatically increase mass-transit use.

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio (D) announced last week that the city will commit to reducing its emissions 80 percent below 1990 levels by 2050 — the global target for keeping warming below 2 degrees C. To help achieve that, his administration rolled out a comprehensive plan to improve energy efficiency in buildings. Major components include retrofitting city facilities and housing projects and providing “green mortgages” for private building owners who want to do the same, installing solar panels on city-owned rooftops, and tightening city building codes for energy efficiency in new buildings.

Depending on how you look at it, C40 may overstate or understate the potential for cities to reduce emissions. The report measures what would happen if all cities adopt the ideal policies for climate mitigation. That’s not politically realistic. On the other hand, there are plenty of urban opportunities that the report does not even go into, like deploying rooftop solar arrays to generate clean energy and urban farms to sequester CO2.

The biggest methodological flaw in C40’s new report is that it uses the U.N.’s definition of cities as metropolitan areas, not distinguishing between inner cities and suburbs. In developed countries, the majority of people in many metro areas live in the suburbs. The mayor of Miami or Atlanta has no authority over those much larger surrounding areas. To achieve these policy changes throughout the “urban” population would thus require the participation not just of big-city mayors, but of thousands upon thousands of small suburban town and county governments. Often, these areas are more politically conservative than major cities. As a practical matter, they are virtually always more sprawling and therefore less hospitable to mass transit.

The main reason C40 used this definition is because there’s better data available about metro areas than about major cities alone. The group does make two points in its defense, though. Central cities control a disproportionate share of some emissions sources, like office buildings and mass transit hubs. Also, in the developing world it is more common for the entire metro area to be under one urban or regional government, and those are the fastest-growing urban areas.

It isn’t just the C40 cities that are stepping up to address climate change. According to another report C40 just released, a total of 228 city governments, representing 436 million people, have set targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. If they meet these targets, they will cumulatively save 13 gigatons of CO2 equivalent by 2050 — more than twice what the U.S. emits in a year from energy-related sources.

On Tuesday, at the U.N. Climate Summit, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and Michael Bloomberg, formerly New York’s mayor and now the U.N. special envoy for cities and climate change, announced the formation of a Compact of Mayors to address climate change. It is backed by C40, Local Governments for Sustainability (ICLEI), and United Cities and Local Governments. Cities that join the compact will collect and share information on best practices — which sounds unexciting. But Rit Aggarwala, an advisor to Bloomberg, told Grist this will achieve three things: “bring order out of chaos so the world can appreciate what’s happening at the city level,” “induce competition,” and “model the good behavior that we want national governments” to adopt.

Some people might wonder whether cities achieving these reductions on their own could take needed pressure off national governments. But it has the potential to show nations that emissions can be reduced without economic pain. As Bloomberg said of next year’s climate negotiations in Paris, “Countries won’t agree to cuts they think they can’t reach. Many national leaders don’t realize how much cities can do to reduce emissions.” The Compact of Mayors and C40 will be a success, said Bloomberg, “if we can close the gap between the perception of what nations can accomplish and what they really can.”


Filed under: Article, Cities, Climate & Energy, Politics
Categories: Environment

At The Beginning Of Autumn, LunaDress Provides Huge Deals On Its...

PR Web - Mon, 09/29/2014 - 23:49

Today, LunaDress has happily launched a special offer for its brand new cocktail party dresses. The company’s sales manager says that all clients can enjoy the promotion before October 10.

(PRWeb September 29, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12205552.htm

Categories: Environment

Wind Turbine Gearbox And Direct-Drive Systems, 2014 Update - Global...

PR Web - Mon, 09/29/2014 - 23:49

MarketResearchReports.Biz included a new market research report, "Wind Turbine Gearbox And Direct-Drive Systems, 2014 Update - Global Market Size, Gearbox Refurbishments, Competitive Landscape...

(PRWeb September 29, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/10/prweb12207126.htm

Categories: Environment

Antarctic ice melt causes small shift in gravity

Grist.org - Mon, 09/29/2014 - 23:06

Gravity — yes, gravity — is the latest victim of climate change in Antarctica. That’s the stunning conclusion announced Friday by the European Space Agency (ESA).

“The loss of ice from West Antarctica between 2009 and 2012 caused a dip in the gravity field over the region,” writes the ESA, whose GOCE satellite measured the change. Apparently, melting billions of tons of ice year after year has implications that would make even Isaac Newton blanch. Here’s the data visualized.

It reminds me of those first images of the ozone hole, decades ago.

To be fair, the change in gravity is very small. It’s not like you’ll float off into outer space on your next vacation to the Antarctic Peninsula.

The biggest implication is the new measurements confirm global warming is changing the Antarctic in fundamental ways. Earlier this year, a separate team of scientists announced that major West Antarctic glaciers have begun an “unstoppable” “collapse,” committing global sea levels to a rise of several meters over the next few hundred years.

Though we all learned in high school physics that gravity is a constant, it actually varies slightly depending on where you are on the Earth’s surface and the density of the rock (or, in this case, ice) beneath your feet. During a four-year mission, the ESA satellite mapped these changes in unprecedented detail and was able to detect a significant decrease in the region of Antarctica where land ice is melting fastest.

The new results in West Antarctica were achieved by combining the high-resolution gravity field measurements from the ESA satellite with a longer-running but lower resolution gravity-analyzing satellite mission called Grace, which is jointly operated by the United States and Germany. Scientists hope to scale up this analysis to all of Antarctica soon, which could provide the clearest picture yet of the pace global warming is taking in the frozen continent. Current best estimates show that global seas could be as much as 50 inches higher by century’s end, due in large part to ice melt in West Antarctica.

Previous research with data from a third satellite, CryoSat (also from ESA), has shown ice loss from this portion of West Antarctica has increased by threefold since just 2009, with 500 cubic kilometers (120 cubic miles) of ice now melting each year from Greenland and Antarctica combined. That’s an iceberg the size of Manhattan, three-and-a-half miles thick.

This story was produced by Slate as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.


Filed under: Article, Climate & Energy, Living
Categories: Environment

Why Vermont is doing maple syrup right

Grist.org - Mon, 09/29/2014 - 22:48

James Coe and Nella Cargioli Coe
Ledgenear Farm
West Glover, Vt.

Vermont equals maple syrup, right? The small state generates 40 percent of the country’s supply. Ledgenear Farm produces maple syrup and dairy (Vermont’s other famous farm product) while sticking with the in-house philosophy, “Give back to the land as much as we take from it.”

Why we chose this farm:

James works with a county forester to maintain the farm’s maple grove so that its density and biodiversity are preserved. As fuel for the fire to boil and process the syrup, he uses harvested wood from the forest instead of oil. Ledgenear’s 200 dairy cows, which enjoy a diet of hay that’s produced on the farm, also help contribute to the farm’s ecosystem. “Our waste products of manure and wash water, which can seem like liabilities to an industry, are really opportunities for us,” says James. “[We] convert them into fertilizers and put them back on the land, return them full circle.”

Making life a little sweeter for the next generation:

James grew up on this farm, left home, then came back to take it over and raise his own family here. “It’s slow, but rewarding. It’s kind of a life’s mission,” he says. “I think the kids will see the fruits of it more than we will, [but] I think that’s how farming goes.”

Click to check out the full map.
Filed under: Food, Living
Categories: Environment

The U.N.’s climate message is as tall as a skyscraper, and it’s gorgeous

Grist.org - Mon, 09/29/2014 - 21:20

The U.N. is making big statements about climate change — about as big as the U.N. itself, or at least the building it lives in.

On Sept. 20, the international governing organization, not typically known for its flashy messaging — along with the Oceanic Preservation Society and some other big-name artists, photographers, and activists — presented, “illUmniNations: Protecting our Planet,” a dazzling video projected onto the side of the U.N headquarters in New York. The shots of endangered species and illustrations of carbon pollution were accompanied by stirring music, a call for reduced carbon emissions, and inspirational narration by the likes of Jane Goodall.

And wait, is that our man Leonardo at minute 1:35? We think yes. And while he’s not bad at blending into the crowd, the newsboy cap and man bun combination is a dead giveaway …

But contemplation of Leo’s fashion choices is interrupted when Jane’s voice interjects: Future generations will look back on our time with scorn if we don’t do something fast. (Ouch, truth hurts.) The words on the screen tell us to invest in green growth and push for a price on carbon. In the crowd, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon gives his nod of affirmation. And scene.


Filed under: Article, Cities, Climate & Energy, Politics
Categories: Environment

Royal Limo Now Provides Wedding Packages for Clients

PR Web - Mon, 09/29/2014 - 20:49

Weddings are one of the most important days of anyone’s life. Royal Limo now offers limousine rentals and wedding packages at affordable rates at...

(PRWeb September 29, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12206494.htm

Categories: Environment

IEA Report Says Solar Could Be Largest Source of Electricity by 2050

PR Web - Mon, 09/29/2014 - 20:49

Calling for “clear, credible and consistent signals from policy makers,” the International Energy Agency (IEA) today released two reports saying solar could be the world’s largest source of...

(PRWeb September 29, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/10/prweb12208692.htm

Categories: Environment

GSky Plant Systems Releases New Upgraded Version of its Smart Wall™...

PR Web - Mon, 09/29/2014 - 20:49

With more than a decade of experience in providing vertical Green Walls, GSky adds new upgrades to its innovative space-saving plant cabinet product targeting homes and offices. Webinar on Oct. 1st...

(PRWeb September 29, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/Gsky/Smart-Wall/prweb12208748.htm

Categories: Environment

The Earth Partners LP Acquires Deadwood Biofuels, Producing Wood...

PR Web - Mon, 09/29/2014 - 20:49

The Earth Partners has acquired Dead Wood Biofuels, a wood pellet facility in the Black Hills of South Dakota, their first operating "conservation biomass" asset.

(PRWeb September 29, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/10/prweb12207131.htm

Categories: Environment

2014 Energy Awareness Month: Bottom's Up Energy Savings in the...

PR Web - Mon, 09/29/2014 - 20:49

During October's annual national Energy Awareness Month, experts at Superior Walls® recommend focusing on the basement of the home to lay the groundwork for years of savings on energy bills.

(PRWeb September 29, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/10/prweb12207348.htm

Categories: Environment

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