Environment

Wowbobblehead.com: Discounted Customized Bobbleheads for Sale

PR Web - Thu, 05/08/2014 - 07:10

Recently, Wowbobblehead.com, a well-known bobblehead manufacturer and retailer, has added its latest range of customized bobbleheads to its online category, and launched a special offer on these new...

(PRWeb May 07, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11831713.htm

Categories: Environment

Mortgage Applications Jump Higher

PR Web - Thu, 05/08/2014 - 07:10

Peoples Home Equity covers Wednesday, May 7ths announcement of weekly mortgage applications.

(PRWeb May 07, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11835791.htm

Categories: Environment

Georgia State Gets First LEED Certification for the Indian Creek Lodge...

PR Web - Thu, 05/08/2014 - 04:10

Georgia State University has been awarded a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification for the Indian Creek Lodge, a student, faculty and staff building used for group meetings...

(PRWeb May 07, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11828172.htm

Categories: Environment

CIGI Report Examines Shifting Diplomatic Coalitions in Internet...

PR Web - Thu, 05/08/2014 - 04:10

A new report from the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI) identifies a much larger group of potential “swing states,” whose behaviour will influence the future of Internet governance...

(PRWeb May 07, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11830279.htm

Categories: Environment

Beautiful Bridesmaid Dresses Under 100 From Experienced Supplier...

PR Web - Thu, 05/08/2014 - 04:10

Recently, Dressestime.com, an experienced supplier of wedding dresses and women’s special occasion dresses, has released its latest range of bridesmaid dresses under $100.

(PRWeb May 07, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11831464.htm

Categories: Environment

2014 Wedding Party Dresses Now On Sale At Fadhits.com

PR Web - Thu, 05/08/2014 - 04:10

Fadhits.com is a renowned supplier of wedding dresses and women’s special occasion outfits. Recently, the company has launched a big sale for its newly released 2014 wedding party dresses.

(PRWeb May 07, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11831469.htm

Categories: Environment

iFitDress.com’s Wonderful, Modest Bridesmaid Dresses Under 100

PR Web - Thu, 05/08/2014 - 01:10

iFitDress.com, a professional company of women’s dresses and related accessories, has recently announced its new collection of modest bridesmaid dresses under $100.

(PRWeb May 07, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11831380.htm

Categories: Environment

May is College Move Out Month: Oklahoma Students at UCO and UCOK Join...

PR Web - Thu, 05/08/2014 - 01:10

Students pledge to "Recycle, Don’t Throw Away!" during College Move Out month. ATRS Clothing & Shoe Recycling campaign set to reduce on campus waste, divert thousands of pounds of...

(PRWeb May 07, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11833272.htm

Categories: Environment

How our national food fight is like a grumpy marriage

Grist.org - Wed, 05/07/2014 - 22:58

Many years ago my stepmother taped this question to the refrigerator: “Would you rather be happy, or right?” When I remarked on the wisdom of this therapeutic reminder (she and my dad are both shrinks), I repeated the question, and she immediately answered it. “Right!” she cackled gleefully, tensing her hands into claws: “I must always be right!”

The point is, of course, that it’s human nature to become so entrenched in the task of winning a fight that you can lose sight of your larger goals. And the will to win is very, very powerful.

Which is why it’s so useful when someone is big enough to step back from the battle over minutiae and reassess the big picture. Mark Bittman recently did just that in a remarkable column in the New York Times.

Our national food fight has been waged over a couple of concepts that have now achieved talismanic significance, and come totally unhinged from reality. Those concepts, according to Bittman? Organics and GMOs.

These concepts are so massive, that — like super planets — they suck in any argument passing through their gravitational field. But if what we care about is improving the environment and feeding people healthy food, these things matter relatively little.

Of course there are a lot of amazing organic farmers, whose commitment to stewardship has vastly improve the environment in their area. But:

[W]e can improve industrial agriculture more quickly and easily than we can convert the whole system to “organic,” which is never going to happen. Unless, of course, we run out of cheap fossil fuel and have to stop moving chemicals and food around the globe willy-nilly.

Furthermore, there’s a very real difference between eating better and growing better. I can eat better starting right now, and it has nothing — zero — to do with shopping at Whole Foods or eating organically. It has to do with eating less junk, hyperprocessed food and industrially raised animal products. The word “organic” need not cross my lips.

When it comes to GMOs, again, people again have an inflated sense of their importance:

Someone recently said to me, “The important issues are food policy, sustainability and GMOs.” That’s like saying, “The important issues are poverty, war and dynamite.” GMOs are cogs in industrial agriculture, the way dynamite is in war; take either away, and you have solved virtually nothing. … Let’s be clear: Biotech in agriculture has been overrated both in its benefits and in its dangers. And by overrating its dangers, the otherwise generally rational “food movement” allows itself to be framed as “anti-science.”

Of course, I could quibble with a couple of Bittman’s points, but nah: The sentiment is pure, the thrust of the argument is sure.

So, in the bigger picture, what really does matter if not organic food and GMOs? If — instead of struggling to be right on GMOs and organics — we just wanted to be happy (or for our great great grandkids to be happy), what should we focus on?

There are two important struggles in food: One is for sustainable agriculture and all that it implies — more respect for the earth and those who live on it (including workers), more care in the use of natural resources in general, more consideration for future generations. The other is for healthier eating: a limit to outright lies in marketing “food” to children, a limit on the sales of foodlike substances, general encouragement for the eating of real food.

I can get on board with those big-picture goals — and I think most people could. Reset the focus like this, and you could form a genuine coalition that cuts across traditional political alliances. That’s not at all what we have now:

Near-hysteria or simple answers lead to unachievable situations and nonsolutions. More effective would be shifting the food culture, the relevant business models and public policies — a gradual and concerted movement toward making production and consumption simply “better.” That is what the good food movement should be about.

Preach it, brother Bittman. Amen!


Filed under: Article, Business & Technology, Food
Categories: Environment

Don’t freak out, but you may be drinking recycled toilet water

Grist.org - Wed, 05/07/2014 - 22:53

Residents in Wichita Falls, Texas, recently told NPR that they’re skeeved out about their old toilet water being turned into drinking water. (The recycled wastewater gets purified in what some disparagingly refer to as “toilet to tap.”) Surprise: You may’ve been drinking that for years without knowing it!

Back in 2009, Reuters reported that Disneyland drinking fountains were circulating “a small quantity of water that once flowed through a sewer.” In fact, more than 2 million Orange County residents drink purified wastewater, due to this drought thing you may have heard about. Same for El Paso. One Washington, D.C., suburb gets about 5 percent of its drinking water from recycled sewage and has been using the process since the ’70s.

Before you grab an Evian in horror, chill. According to The New York Times, only a TEENY amount of drinking water in America used to be in your toilet — one-tenth of a percent. As Wichita Falls official Daniel Nix told NPR:

“The vast majority of water that enters a wastewater plant did not come from a toilet,” he says. “They come from sinks, and bathtubs, and washing machines and dishwashers.”

Plus, the water is, you know, CLEANED between your toilet and your mouth. (Don’t make us break out the “pee is super-sterile” line.) According to NPR, it’s chlorinated, filtered, and subjected to reverse osmosis. Everything from viruses to pharmaceuticals and chemicals are filtered out. One resident of the O.C. even did a taste test comparing bottled water to former toilet water, and he couldn’t tell them apart — something cats have been telling us for years.

Considering that the global population is booming, climate change means increasing drought, and some people don’t have access to clean drinking water at ALL, this really ain’t so bad. If 5 million Singapore residents can get used to it, so can we!


Filed under: Climate & Energy, Living
Categories: Environment

DMG Productions is Gathering Content for New Episodes of Innovations...

PR Web - Wed, 05/07/2014 - 22:10

If you have a product, service or technology that is television worthy and impacting your industry, you may be a good match.

(PRWeb May 07, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11833050.htm

Categories: Environment

WaterSMART Funding Opportunity Available to Establish or Expand...

PR Web - Wed, 05/07/2014 - 22:10

The Bureau of Reclamation’s Cooperative Watershed Management Program is accepting applications from entities seeking to establish or expand watershed management groups. The funding for this...

(PRWeb May 07, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11833733.htm

Categories: Environment

MEDIA ADVISORY: Greenpeace Co-founder Patrick Moore to Speak at 9th...

PR Web - Wed, 05/07/2014 - 22:10

Joins “World’s Biggest Gathering of ‘Skeptic’ Scientists and Policy Experts” Taking Place in Las Vegas on July 7–9

(PRWeb May 07, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11833895.htm

Categories: Environment

EasyTurf Exhibits at National Hardware Show in Vegas

PR Web - Wed, 05/07/2014 - 22:10

EasyTurf is currently showcasing the Ultimate Synthetic Grass system at the National Hardware Show in Las Vegas. More than just artificial grass, the EasyTurf system is adaptable to nearly every...

(PRWeb May 07, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11833932.htm

Categories: Environment

Mount Sinai Genetic Testing Laboratory Nearly Doubles Diseases Covered...

PR Web - Wed, 05/07/2014 - 22:10

With expanded screening test, 50 percent of Ashkenazi Jewish individuals are expected to be identified as carriers of at least one of the 38 diseases

(PRWeb May 07, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11835216.htm

Categories: Environment

Can renting a washing machine help combat cheap appliances?

Grist.org - Wed, 05/07/2014 - 21:32

Any grandparent will tell you today’s appliances are junky pieces o’ shit that don’t last NEARLY as long as they used to. And the cheapness of it all costs us: “A high-end [washing machine] hurts at checkout time, yet could produce up to five times more washes over its lifetime, according to one analysis,” writes Fast Company.

Bundles, a new washing machine rental service in the Netherlands, aims to change that by giving people access to high-quality washers.

If you don’t have $1,800 to plunk down for a new Miele WKG 120 WCS washing machine — and who does? — you can use one in your own home for about $26 a month. (No contract and no trips to the laundromat; score!) That fee covers 15 loads of laundry, or you can pay an extra $5 to double your washes.

A Bundles rep delivers and installs the washing machine, which is fitted with a smart plug that measures how many loads of laundry you do and if the machine needs a tune-up. Bundle also recommends ways to save energy and refunds up to three unused wash cycles a month. From Fast Company:

[Founder Marcel] Peters says subscribing to the service is only marginally more expensive than buying the model yourself … It’s also a lot cheaper than leasing to buy, which could come in at double the starting price once the contract is up, he says …

Because Peters takes back the machines when people are finished with them, he can ensure they’re reused or disposed of properly. Ultimately, the aim is to create a circular loop that encourages people to buy better washing machines and to create washing machines that are better for recycling.

Cool, right? Maybe cheap fashion and other industries could be disrupted the same way.


Filed under: Business & Technology, Living
Categories: Environment

How to bike to work

Grist.org - Wed, 05/07/2014 - 20:38

It’s almost Bike to Work Day! On May 8, every casual cyclist’s favorite holiday turns 20. Thinking about getting your wheels outta the garage? Here’s a quick guide to a safe ride.

Planet Plan it

A little preparation, snooze-worthy as it may be, makes for a much smoother trip. Make sure there’s plenty of air in your tires — taking your bike in for a quick tune-up is never a bad idea. Do you have a good helmet, lights, U-lock, and horn (not one of those dainty jingly things)? A rear-view mirror can be a big help, too.

If you won’t be showering when you get to work, pack some baby wipes or a simple washcloth to freshen up. Depending on your office’s dress code and the weather, you may want to bring a change of clothes in a backpack. (Super-prepared types should also pack a spare innertube and tools for a flat.)

Then map your route using online tools like Google’s bike maps or Map My Ride, old-fashioned paper bike maps (!), or advice from the peeps at your local cycle shop. A test ride to work on a lazy Sunday is ideal, but even a simple practice spin around the block can reacquaint you with your cycle’s gears and brakes before you brave rush-hour traffic.

Give yourself a buffer

Allow yourself extra time to get to work, especially if you haven’t made a dry run before. Signal for turns as if drivers were blind. Actually, that’s a good rule of thumb: Assume people in cars can’t see you. As one Grist commenter says, “My philosophy was to ride with the attitude that every driver wanted to kill me, and it was my job to keep that from happening.” There is no shame in getting off and walking your bike for a couple blocks if conditions get hairy or there’s a huge hill. Give yourself a cushion of extra care, safety, and time whenever possible.

On the road

Keep your wits about you! Obey traffic signs and signals — intersections are especially dangerous. Be wary of parked cars so you don’t get doored, and glance behind you before changing lanes. And watch the road ahead for obstacles in the bike lane like construction equipment.

Here are some more urban cycling tips we made last year:

Lock that shit down

Once you get there, secure your bike! (In NYC, some 60,000 bikes are stolen annually, according to Sarah Goodyear.) Make sure your U-lock goes through your bike frame AND wheels, or you may come back to a unicycle. Chain or otherwise lock your seat down, too. And lock your bike to something immovable, not scaffolding, which could get removed anytime.

Enjoy the bennies

Bask in the benefits of your bike commute: a boon to your health, money saved on gas and parking, and of course the environmental pluses, like cleaner air and fewer carbon emissions. Did we mention bragging rights and plain ole satisfaction? YOU GO!


Filed under: Cities, Living
Categories: Environment

Bill Nye keeps fighting the good fight, debates climate change on CNN

Grist.org - Wed, 05/07/2014 - 19:27

Thanks to the Obama administration’s high-profile rollout of the National Climate Assessment, climate change was, for a day yesterday, the nation’s leading story. Different media outlets approached it in different ways, but when it came to CNN’s Crossfire … well, not surprisingly, the show opted for a debate about the science.

The result was a lot of sound and fury, but at least the debater on the side of reality – Bill Nye the Science Guy – gave as good as he got. Nye was up against not only conservative host S.E. Cupp, who said the White House was engaging in global warming “scare tactics” and accused “science guys” of attempting to “bully other people,” but also Nick Loris of the Heritage Foundation. Loris acknowledged that humans are responsible for “some part” of the changing climate and claimed that “I’m not a denier, I’m not a skeptic,” but he also asserted that “we’ve had Arctic ice, globally, increasing” (not!) and that “we’ve had this 16-to-17-year hiatus in warming.” (Actually, the notion that global warming is “slowing down” is very misleading.)

“Let’s just start with, we don’t agree on the facts,” Nye said to Loris and Cupp. “This third report [the National Climate Assessment] came out, saying it’s very serious. You say, ‘No.’ Right? There’s the essence of the problem.”

Watch it:

At another stage of the debate, Nye delivered the coup de grace: He asked both Cupp and Loris what would change their minds about the threat posed by climate change. Loris’ answer, amazingly, was better science – which was just delivered in the form of the National Climate Assessment. Watch it:

You have to slog through seas of misinformation to defend science these days. But deniers be warned: When you go up against an entertainer like Nye, you may not only be refuted … but it might also be pretty memorable.

This story was produced as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.


Filed under: Climate & Energy
Categories: Environment

Kowa Announces Exhibition at this Year’s Biggest Week in American...

PR Web - Wed, 05/07/2014 - 19:09

Kowa will join the top optics manufacturers exhibiting at this year’s event in Oak Harbor, OH.

(PRWeb May 07, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11827065.htm

Categories: Environment

myinformationsecuritypolicy.com Offering Instant Online Download of...

PR Web - Wed, 05/07/2014 - 19:09

Businesses can now obtain information security policy templates by instantly downloading today from myinformationsecuritypolicy.com, a leading provider of high-quality, professionally developed I.T....

(PRWeb May 07, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11828278.htm

Categories: Environment

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