Environment

Experiencias Xcaret Group Plants More Than 400 Thousand Plants in 18...

PR Web - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 09:23

Playa del Carmen, Chemuyil, Tulum, Valladolid, Cancun and Riviera Maya are the places that have benefitted from the reforestation efforts.More than 200 thousand plants have contributed to restoring...

(PRWeb July 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12025023.htm

Categories: Environment

Find High Quality SMA RF Connectors on China Electrical Accessory...

PR Web - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 09:23

Recently, LenoRF, an experienced electrical accessory manufacturer based in China, has unveiled its new versions of SMB connectors and launched a new special offer. All its brand new connectors are...

(PRWeb July 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12025536.htm

Categories: Environment

Laptop Power UK Now Discusses ‘What Makes Consumer Electronics Salvage...

PR Web - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 09:23

Laptop Power UK conducts consumer electronics repairs and reverse logistics processes on behalf of their clients. There is no other Company operating within Europe that pays such close attention to...

(PRWeb July 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12018422.htm

Categories: Environment

Tour the Green Mountain State in Style with New BMW Z4 Country Driving...

PR Web - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 09:23

Local-led tours guide visitors over rolling farmland, through covered bridges in zippy convertible.

(PRWeb July 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12018753.htm

Categories: Environment

DDC FPO Stands for Sustainable Ecosystems with WildEarth Guardians

PR Web - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 09:23

DDC FPO supports preservation of the American West at the WildEarth Guardians 2014 Howling Affair Benefit in Denver, Colorado

(PRWeb July 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12023973.htm

Categories: Environment

Communities of Distinction Features Solivita, an AV Homes Community

PR Web - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 09:23

Communities of Distinction features Solivita, a 55+ AV Homes community in Central Florida.

(PRWeb July 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/communitiesofdistinction-/feaures-solivita-avhomes/prweb12024503.htm

Categories: Environment

Olson Iron Now Offering Ornamental Iron Balconies in Las Vegas

PR Web - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 09:23

Olson Iron now offers ornamental Iron Balconies in Las Vegas for enhancing the beauty and protecting the property.

(PRWeb July 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/Olson-Iron/Iron-Balconies/prweb12024684.htm

Categories: Environment

Native American Business Leader Receives Award

PR Web - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 09:23

Dr. Ron Sheffield, a member of the Quechan Native American Tribe of Fort Yuma Arizona, was presented the Badger Award at the 2014 American Indian Business Leaders Conference.

(PRWeb July 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12025300.htm

Categories: Environment

Collar For Collar Launches Apparel Website To Help Dogs In Need of...

PR Web - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 09:23

Online Retailer Offers Unique Shirts, Hats and Canine Accessories and Donates Half The Profits To Rescue Organizations and Shelters

(PRWeb July 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12020294.htm

Categories: Environment

Parade of Ponds 2014 Presented by Premier Ponds

PR Web - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 09:23

The annual Parade of Ponds event, presented by Premier Ponds, is once again showcasing some of the most creative and exquisite water features available in Frederick, Maryland.

(PRWeb July 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12015323.htm

Categories: Environment

AnewAmerica Celebrates Bay Area Green Microenterprises

PR Web - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 09:23

The triple bottom line is not just for multi-national firms but also for everyday businesses right in our own neighborhood. Sunnyvale residents Patricia Romero and Jaime Camacho founders of My Little...

(PRWeb July 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12020188.htm

Categories: Environment

LunaDress Offers Dress Customizations And Adds 2000 New Items To Its...

PR Web - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 09:23

LunaDress has recently announced its new selection of (including a total of 2000 models); these new items are specially designed for the global consumers, and they have been highlighted on quite a few...

(PRWeb July 16, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12025453.htm

Categories: Environment

VogueQueen.com Announces Celebratory Sale and Provides Trendy Tips for...

PR Web - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 09:23

Recently, VogueQueen.com, a famous online supplier in the current market, has announced a celebratory sale for its gorgeous wedding gowns. All its wedding outfits now come with big discounts (up to...

(PRWeb July 16, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12025469.htm

Categories: Environment

iFitDress.com Offers Discounted Yellow Party Dresses For The Global...

PR Web - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 09:23

Recently, iFitDress.com, an innovative company that provides many kinds of wedding dresses and women’s special occasion dresses, has released its latest range of yellow party dresses. In addition, the...

(PRWeb July 16, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12025506.htm

Categories: Environment

Four things you should know about Detroit’s water crisis

Grist.org - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 09:02

This May, the Detroit Water and Sewerage District (DWSD) sent out 46,000 shutoff notices to customers who were behind in their water bills. It was the latest calamity to befall a city that had seen its water rates rise 119 percent in the last decade.

As a city that has lost nearly two-thirds of its population in the last 60 years, Detroit has a lot of water infrastructure to maintain, and not much money to maintain it.

Since the shutoffs began (about 17,000 households and small businesses have lost service to date), residents have fought back hard. They’ve blocked trucks that are being sent out to shut off water accounts. They’ve called out DWSD for focusing on shutting off water to private homes that don’t even owe that much, while ignoring golf courses that owe amounts in the hundreds of thousands. (DWSD responded that it had focused on residential customers because shutting off water to a large-scale user was more technically complicated than most of its employees can handle.) They’ve accused DWSD of dropping low-income customers as a way of making the system more appealing to potential buyers. (Whether or not that’s true, Detroit emergency manager Kevin Orr has spoken openly about selling DWSD to a private company.) They’ve organized brigades of volunteers to bring water in to people who’ve had their accounts shut off. They even got the United Nations to condemn the way that DWSD is handing the situation.

But what’s happening in Detroit isn’t just Detroit’s problem. It has larger implications for the rest of us. Here’s what you need to know.

Water is getting more expensive everywhere.

This is true both internationally and in the U.S., where the cost of water has been rising faster than the rate of inflation.

There’s no federal policy to help people deal with the cost of water.

As Jan Beecher, with the Institute of Public Utilities at Michigan State University, told the Los Angeles Times there are no federal programs to help people pay for the rising cost of water, the way that there are for fuel and electricity (or housing, for that matter).

“We’ve never really developed a clear public policy toward universal service and water,” Beecher said. “International organizations are concerned with a basic level of service, but with water, the tricky thing is that drinking water would fall into that, but watering the lawn would not be considered a basic human right.”

That said, until recently, Detroit actually had a program that helped low-income residents pay their water bills.

It was called the Water Affordability Plan. As Roger Colton, a utilities consultant, told the Los Angeles Times:

The last time Detroit began shutting off water for unpaid bills a decade ago, Colton worked with the Michigan Poverty Law Program to develop a program that would help the water department collect money while still keeping water affordable. He found that whereas the federal Environmental Protection Agency recommends that families spend no more than 2.5 percent of their pretax income on water and sewer service, some Detroit residents were paying more than 20 percent.

Colton argues that cities won’t get the money they want by simply shutting off services. Instead, he says, utilities should require residents to pay a percentage of their income to the water department for service.

“If you give someone a more affordable bill, you end up collecting more of the bills,” he said.

Taking Colton’s advice into account, Detroit’s water department implemented a program that allowed residents to start making payments on their bills even if they were thousands of dollars behind. But that program was cut during the city’s bankruptcy.

This year the DWSD says it has a $1 million fund for residents who need help paying their water bills — money raised by voluntary contributions from customers.

The infrastructure that was designed to keep us all hydrated is in trouble everywhere, not just Detroit.

Detroit did most of its growing in the 30 years between 1920 and 1950 – the population nearly doubled, from 994,000 to 1,850,000 (It’s now about 685,000). This is the same time window during which much of America’s water infrastructure was being laid out: people were moving from the country to the cities, and there were generous federal subsidies that helped put those pipes in the ground.

Other cities that put in a lot of water infrastructure during this time, like Los Angeles and Chicago, can expect to see the same problems, since everything built during that 20-year period is going to break more or less all at once. Writes the New York Times:

The oldest cast-iron pipes, dating to the late 1800s, have an average useful life of about 120 years. For cast-iron pipes installed in the 1920s, that drops to about 100 years. And pipes put in after World War II have an average life of only around 75 years. The upshot is that all three vintages of pipe will need replacement in a short stretch of time.

The EPA has been writing reports for years about how America’s water infrastructure is old, leaky, and generally unsafe, and how it’s going to take New Deal-style funding to get it back in shape. The bad news is that, as a country, we’re more excited about building new things than fixing old ones.

But then there’s the good news: With so much water infrastructure across the country in need of repair, there’s real opportunity to design and experiment with systems that are better adapted for drought, heavy rainfall, sea-level rise, and the extreme weather events that climate disruption is already laying on us. While Detroit is dealing with the worst of it, these questions are ones we should all be thinking about.


Filed under: Article, Business & Technology, Cities, Politics
Categories: Environment

The Jennifer Warren Team Launches New Burlington, Ontario Real Estate...

PR Web - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 03:21

The Jennifer Warren Team has just launched CreateYourOwnLuck.ca, a new website that serves as a one-stop Burlington, Ontario real estate resource. It features property listings, local resources, tools...

(PRWeb July 16, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/OntarioRealEstate/TheJenniferWarrenTeam/prweb11949373.htm

Categories: Environment

Fenstermaker to Exhibit at the 2014 Pipeline Safety Conference in New...

PR Web - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 00:21

Fenstermaker leaders specializing in pipeline services are scheduled to attend and exhibit at the Safety Conference from July 21-25.

(PRWeb July 16, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12023287.htm

Categories: Environment

Federal Government Forecasts Big Gains for Solar Energy

PR Web - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 00:21

A new report issued today by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) predicts that most new electric generation capacity in the United States through 2040 will come from natural gas and renewable...

(PRWeb July 16, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12024528.htm

Categories: Environment

Now Google Street View is mapping gas pipeline leaks

Grist.org - Wed, 07/16/2014 - 23:32

Some of those Google cars that drive around photographing streetscapes and embarrassing moments have captured something extra — something that should embarrass major utilities. The cars were kitted out by University of Colorado scientists with sensors that sniff out natural gas leaking from underground pipelines. These methane-heavy leaks contribute to global warming, waste money, and can fuel explosions.

The sensor-equipped cars cruised the streets of Boston, New York’s Staten Island, and Indianapolis. They returned to sites where methane spikes were detected to confirm the presence of a leak. The results were released Wednesday by the Environmental Defense Fund, which coordinated the project, revealing just how leaky old and metallic pipelines can be, such as those used in the East Coast cities studied, particularly when compared with noncorrosive pipes like those beneath Indianapolis.

About one leak was discovered for each mile driven in Boston, Mass.:

EDF

The findings were similar in Staten Island, N.Y.:

EDF

In Indianapolis, Ind., by contrast, about one leak was found for every 200 miles that the cars covered:

EDF
Filed under: Climate & Energy
Categories: Environment

Mother jailed for letting her daughter run free — at the playground

Grist.org - Wed, 07/16/2014 - 22:57

Remember Another Bad Creation’s song, “At the Playground”?

A more recent story that happened at the playground: A mother lets her child go to the playground by herself and goes to jail for it.

The young girl, just 9 years old, is used to spending hours and days on the internet in McDonald’s, not only because it has free wi-fi, but because it’s where her mother works. It’s summer, and Debra Harrell can’t afford to put her daughter in daycare, because it’s McDonald’s.

The restaurant is daycare, but on this particular day the girl wants to go to a playground, a little over a mile away. Harrell allows her, and is later charged with “unlawful conduct towards a child” for letting her go unsupervised. Her daughter goes to state custody.

I’m really glad Jonathan Chait stepped outside of his normal political coverage at New York Magazine to draw attention to this story, which happened earlier this month, in North Augusta, S.C., where apparently it’s a crime for parents to trust their kids and their surrounding environment.

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The additional facts on this story, as presented by Lenore Skenazy over at reason, make it even more heartbreaking. Harrell had saved up to buy her daughter a laptop only for it to be stolen when their house was robbed. It wasn’t the first time her mother let her go to the playground by herself, and she gave her daughter her cellphone before sending her along.

Chait sums it up well:

The story is a convergence of helicopter parenting with America’s primitive family policy. Our welfare policy is designed to make everybody, even single mothers, work full-time jobs. The social safety net makes it difficult for low-wage single mothers to obtain adequate child care. And society is seized by bizarre fears that children are routinely snatched up by strangers in public places. The phenomenon is, in fact, nearly as rare as in-person voting fraud.

I think our raged-but-false security senses and the rarity of child-snatching are worth pointing out, but there are other issues here that involve the criminalization of black women, and the ongoing, unresolved issues of public park space: Who belongs in it and under what terms.

For the Harrell family, going to the playground is a luxury. The adults who could afford to be there that day assumed that her mother’s choice was irresponsible. Given the girl is black, they may have assumed worse: Mom’s a crackhead? Prostitute? Whatever the case, the child’s answer, that her mother was at work, was not good enough.

The adult who snitched Harrell out made another assumption: that parenting means around-the-clock supervision of children, and anything less is uncivilized. It’s those kind of gentry values that the creators of city public park systems were trying to avoid. They wanted a safe space accessible to people of all classes and backgrounds to enjoy recreation. Instead, in too many places it’s become a place where black and brown youth are made to feel they don’t belong — and certainly not without supervision.

But unsupervised play might be exactly what children need. In a society where everyone has cameras on their phones, tablets and computers, no one is ever really unsupervised. But I think Sarah Goodyear hit the right note on this when she discussed unmonitored kid time in the Atlantic’s Citylab:

Traditional street play is good for kids, and fun for kids, precisely because it allows them to figure out how to use their environment in creative ways on their own, or maybe with the help of adults who are doing their own socializing on the street. Kids call the shots themselves, making a tree first base and a manhole cover second and the streetlamp third. They figure out how to make fair teams, learn which scoring systems work and which don’t. They learn which grown-ups they can count on to retrieve a lost ball, and how to knock an errant football down from the branches of a tree. They get to know each other by creating something together.

For urban kids, this kind of self-structuring play is vital. They can’t run around in the woods, the way that kids in rural areas can. But they can learn to navigate the environment that they live in, thereby gaining mastery over it and themselves. It’s very different from the league play that has taken over the lives of many urban families in the last 20 years.

That playground and that community make up the child’s environment, and Harrell has the right to allow her daughter to explore, discover, and make sense of that environment on her own. This is true even given that Harrell had little other option except to let her sit at a McDonald’s booth.

Now her daughter has a whole other environment to make sense of: South Carolina’s Department of Social Services, which her mother can hopefully help her with when she gets out of jail.


Filed under: Cities
Categories: Environment

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