Environment

Filta Environmental Kitchen Solutions Praises the NBA, AT&T...

PR Web - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 20:06

Orlando, FL based Filta Environmental Kitchen Solutions, a company well known for providing sustainability solutions in sports venues across the country applauds the NBA, AT&T Center, and the...

(PRWeb June 05, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11918879.htm

Categories: Environment

The Benefits of E-waste Recycling

PR Web - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 20:06

Join Miller Recycling on their next E-Waste Event on Saturday June 7th, from 8:00am-2:00pm at their 73 Plymouth Street Mansfield, MA facility.

(PRWeb June 05, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11919924.htm

Categories: Environment

Northern Westchester Hospital and North Shore-LIJ Enter Exclusive...

PR Web - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 20:06

Northern Westchester Hospital Board of Trustees has unanimously approved a letter of intent to explore joining the North Shore-LIJ Health System.

(PRWeb June 05, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11920337.htm

Categories: Environment

Crazy contraption turns cow poo into clean water, fertilizer, and natural gas (ahem)

Grist.org - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 19:11

Some people look at a giant cow turd and think to themselves, “Don’t step there.” But not the intrepid researchers at Michigan State University. Oh no, they gaze upon that steaming pie and see refreshment in their future! Yep, it’s true: They’ve figured out a way to extract clean water from not-so-clean cow dung.

I know what you’re thinking: “Water from cow shit? Bullshit.” And you’re right — it works on bulls too!

The McLanahan Nutrient Separation System, which was developed at MSU and is now being primed for commercial use by the McLanahan Corp., aims to put an end to wasting all that, er, waste. The system starts with an anaerobic digester, a device that uses bacteria to extract methane – a natural gas that can then be burned to generate electricity. Then the McLanahan gets funky. In addition to the digester, it includes ultrafiltration, air-stripping, and a reverse osmosis system.

The process produces not only gas energy, but also fertilizer and clean water. The water isn’t safe for you and me to drink, but it’s good enough to give back to the cows, “or, at the very least, to dispose of in an environmentally friendly manner,” according to the university.

Kate Abbey-Lambertz of The Huffington Post put it thusly:

When you start doing the math — multiplying the manure?! — the McLanahan system begins to make a lot of sense. In 2011, the average U.S. dairy herd size was 179 cows, according to farming magazine Hoard’s Dairyman. A cow produces about 10,000 gallons of manure each year, MSU scientists say, but 90 percent of it is water. Their system captures 50 gallons of clean water from 100 gallons of manure, though they’re working to increase collection to 65 gallons of water.

That means an average farm accumulates something like 1,790,000 gallons of manure annually — and could be producing nearly 900,000 gallons of clean water or more.

Ewwww that is awesome! Did I say Ew? I meant to say Oh! Oh that is awesome! But thank you, professor, I will pass on that tempting glass of Kool-Aid.

Yes, cattle farming is still very bad, but at least this process could help mitigate some small bit of the crushing amount of water required to make your hamburger. McClanahan Corp. hopes to have it on the market by the end of the year.


Filed under: Business & Technology, Climate & Energy
Categories: Environment

Neil deGrasse Tyson explains how Republicans blew it on climate change

Grist.org - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 17:34

If you care about the place of science in our culture, then this has to be the best news in a very long time. Last Sunday night, Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey – which airs on Fox and then the next day on the National Geographic Channel – actually tied ABC’s The Bachelorette for the top ratings among young adult viewers, the “key demographic” coveted by advertisers. And it did so by – that’s right – airing an episode about the reality of climate change.

Tuesday evening, I had the privilege of sitting down with the show’s host, astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, to discuss this milestone, and how he feels generally as the 13-part series comes to a close. (The final episode, entitled “Unafraid of the Dark,” airs this Sunday night.) “The ratings are exceeding our expectations,” said Tyson, fresh off the climate episode triumph. But Tyson emphasized that to him, that’s not the most important fact: Rather, it’s that a science show aired at all in primetime on Sunday night.

“You had entertainment writers putting The Walking Dead in the same sentence as Cosmos,” said Tyson. “Game of Thrones in the same sentence of Cosmos. ‘How’s Cosmos doing against Game of Thrones?’ That is an extraordinary fact, no matter what ratings it earned.”

I spoke with Tyson in the National Geographic Society’s Hubbard Hall in D.C., below a painting of the society’s founders signing its charter in 1888. Tyson, wearing a glittering space-themed tie, sipped white wine before moving upstairs to a reception where he was destined for an hour of handshakes and selfies. Later that evening – after a special advance airing of the final episode of Cosmos – he would electrify a packed room by explaining to a young girl how solar flares work, a display that involved him sprawling across the stage (and his fellow panelists) as he contorted his body to mimic the dynamics of the sun’s plasma. The show concluded with Tyson explaining how “plasma pies” (as he dubbed them), ejected towards us by our star, ultimately become the aurora borealis and the aurora australis.

There were other Cosmos luminaries on the stage – including executive producers Brannon Braga and Ann Druyan, Carl Sagan’s widow – but Tyson won the room that night. Easily.

Fox/National GeographicNeil deGrasse Tyson, surveying some of the universe’s awesomeness in Cosmos.

Overall, Tyson notes, Cosmos premiered not only on Fox but on National Geographic Channel and, globally, in 181 countries and 46 languages. “It tells you that science is trending in our culture,” Tyson averred to me. “And if science is trending, that can only be good for the health, the wealth, and the security of our species, of our civilization.”

And yet, many members of our species still deny that the globe is warming thanks to human activities – a point that Cosmos has not only made a centerpiece but that, the program has frankly argued, threatens civilization as we know it. Tyson is know for being fairly non-confrontational; for not wanting to directly argue with or debate those who deny science in various areas. He prefers to just tell it like it is, to educate. But when we talked he was, perhaps, a little more blunt than usual.

“At some point, I don’t know how much energy they have to keep fighting it,” he said of those who don’t accept the science of climate change. “It’s an emergent scientific truth.” Tyson added that in the political sphere, denying the science is just a bad strategy. “The Republican Party, so many of its members are resistant to embracing the facts of climate change that the legislation that they should be eager to influence, they’re left outside the door,” said Tyson. “Because they think the debate is whether or not it’s happening, rather than what policy and legislation can serve their interests going forward.”

You can argue, in fact, that that is exactly what happened this week. One day after Cosmos’ highly rated climate episode aired, the EPA announced its new regulations for power plant carbon dioxide emissions. The whole reason that the Obama administration went this route – regulating carbon via the Clean Air Act – was that climate legislation (the first option, and the more desirable option) was impossible. The legislative math didn’t work. It would never pass.

Now, Republicans are extraordinarily upset by the EPA’s rules, as the agency moves in to fill a legislative vacuum. But thanks to their denial, they may well have lost their chance to find a more ideologically desirable solution, like a carbon tax. (In fairness, some coal state Democrats were also responsible for the failure of cap-and-trade legislation in Congress. West Virginia Democrat Joe Manchin famously shot the bill with a rifle in an ad for his 2010 Senate campaign.)

That’s bad for our politics, just as climate change is bad for our civilization – but it is surely some small saving grace to at least learn, thanks to Tyson and Cosmos, that science is not bad for the television business. The success of Cosmos, Tyson thinks, changes what can be on TV; how future network programmers will think, in the future, about what constitutes desirable content.

“It will open up their definition of what can be in primetime television,” he said.

On our most popular episode of the Inquiring Minds podcast, Neil Tyson explained why he doesn’t debate science deniers, and much more. You can listen here (interview starts around minute 13):

This story was produced as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.


Filed under: Climate & Energy
Categories: Environment

American Southwest heating faster than rest of nation

Grist.org - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 17:16

Stick a fork in the American Southwest. The ranches there are broiled.

Separate analyses published this week both found that the region has heated up more than any other in the U.S. in recent decades as global warming’s most prominent effect — warming — has taken hold. The first analysis came from Climate Central, which looked at summertime heat:

Climate Central

From Climate Central’s article:

Nationwide, the summer warming trend averages out to a little more than 0.4°F per decade since 1970. The places warming the fastest also happen to be some of the hottest places in the country, with a large chunk of the Southwest and all of Texas warming more than 1°F per decade.

The notable blue spot in a sea of red is the Upper Midwest, where substantial parts of Iowa and the Dakotas have seen a slight cooling trend since 1970. Interestingly, that region is actually home to some of the fastest-warming states when you look at the change in annual average temperatures. Winters in particular have warmed dramatically there over the past 40 years.

On that note, the AP analyzed average year-round temperatures, reaching these conclusions:

The United States is warming fastest at two of its corners, in the Northeast and the Southwest, an analysis of federal temperature records shows. …

The Southwest warming, especially in the summer, seems to be driven by dryness, because when there is little water the air and ground warm up faster, said Katharine Hayhoe, a climate scientist at Texas Tech University in Lubbock.

“Heat and drought are a vicious cycle that has been hitting the Southwest hard in recent years,” Hayhoe said.

And in the Northeast, the temperatures are pushed up by milder winters and warm water in the North Atlantic, said Kevin Trenberth, climate analysis chief at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. And less snow on the ground over the winter often means warmer temperatures, said Alan Betts, a climate scientist at Atmospheric Research in Pittsford, Vermont.

The Southeast and Northwest were among the places that warmed the least. In the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic, industrial sulfur particle pollutants from coal burning may be reflecting sunlight, thus countering heating caused by coal’s carbon dioxide emissions, said Pennsylvania State University professor Michael Mann.

Of course, warming isn’t the only impact that’s being felt from climate change. Another prominent impact is rising seas. And The Washington Post recently reported that high tides have risen by 1.5 feet during the past decade in Norfolk, Va., where water levels have been rising faster than anywhere else on the East Coast.


Filed under: Climate & Energy
Categories: Environment

Updated Conflict Minerals Training Course Now Available from WeComply

PR Web - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 17:06

WeComply, Inc., a Thomson Reuters business and leader in web-based ethics and compliance training, has announced an updated version of its...

(PRWeb June 05, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11912374.htm

Categories: Environment

Bixby International is Highlighted in New Balance Ad Campaign

PR Web - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 17:06

New Balance makes more than shoes in America, it supports local manufactures, as represented in their latest ad campaign.

(PRWeb June 05, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11913205.htm

Categories: Environment

Tate Airflow Announces New DirectAire® Al

PR Web - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 17:06

DirectAire Al Offers Directional Airflow in a Strong, Light-weight Panel

(PRWeb June 05, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11917535.htm

Categories: Environment

Wholesaler SMA Reverse Polarities Provided By China Electrical...

PR Web - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 17:06

Recently, LenoRF, a distinguished electrical accessory factory, has unveiled its new collection of SMA reverse polarities and launched a promotion for its high quality items.

(PRWeb June 05, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11918391.htm

Categories: Environment

Cheap DisplayPort to DVI Adapters Released by China Electronics...

PR Web - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 17:06

Recently, Hiconn Electronics, a famous company that offers various kinds of electronics accessories, has announced its latest collection of DisplayPort to DVI Adapters.

(PRWeb June 05, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11918748.htm

Categories: Environment

Prepare for Camping Trips with Amica’s First-aid Kit Checklist

PR Web - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 17:06

Camping is perfect for a peaceful weekend getaway, but Amica Insurance is helping you prepare for the unexpected.

(PRWeb June 05, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11919125.htm

Categories: Environment

Midwest Soil Improvement Symposium Coming to Kansas State University...

PR Web - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 17:06

The fourth annual Midwest Soil Improvement Symposium is scheduled for August 13, 2014 in Manhattan, KS. The one-day event features research and practical information about using gypsum for...

(PRWeb June 05, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11916585.htm

Categories: Environment

Bee Goods and Tees/ Inspired Living Partnership

PR Web - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 17:06

Bee Goods and Tees is pleased to announce our new retail partnership with Inspired Living!

(PRWeb June 05, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11917758.htm

Categories: Environment

Comprehensive HIPAA Security Audits and Assessments for Orange County...

PR Web - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 17:06

NDB now offers industry leading HIPAA security audits and assessment services for Covered Entities (CE) and Business Associates (BA) located in Orange County California. Southern California health...

(PRWeb June 05, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11918759.htm

Categories: Environment

This is how little it costs for states to go renewable

Grist.org - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 16:50

States can boost renewable energy capacity at bargain-basement prices, a new study finds.

Federal researchers examined the 29 states where renewable portfolio standards (RPS’s) have been in place for more than five years. They concluded that these standards, which require utilities to generate a certain percentage of power from clean sources, led to the development of 46,000 megawatts of renewable capacity up until 2012 — and that they raised electricity rates by an average of less than 2 percent.

NRELClick to embiggen.

(If you’re wondering why California’s green line extends above and below the zero-cost line, it’s because the researchers used two different methodologies — one suggested that the state’s ambitious standard resulted in net costs, while the other suggested that it actually resulted in net savings.)

The researchers, scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, also examined other studies that have attempted to quantify the economic impacts of RPS policies: “A number of the studies examined economic development benefits annually or over the lifespan of the renewable energy projects, with benefits on the order of $1-$6 billion, or $22-30/MWh of renewable generation.” RPS’s can also help make electricity prices more stable, the researchers note.

And, as there’s more to life than electricity prices and economic development, it’s worth noting that RPS’s also contribute to water savings, cleaner air, and a more stable climate.

Nonetheless, renewable energy standards have been targeted by right-wing groups like American Legislative Exchange Council, which are pushing state legislatures to repeal them. The RPS foes are poised to score their first victory in Ohio. As Grist’s Eve Andrews wrote last week, Ohio Gov. John Kasich (R) is expected to sign a bill that would freeze the state’s renewable-energy and energy-efficiency standards.

It’s not just enviros and climate hawks who are bemoaning that development. Honda, Whirlpool, and 49 other businesses operating in Ohio sent a letter to Kasich on Wednesday objecting to the move. “Freezing the standards for two years creates a start-stop effect that will confuse the marketplace, disrupt investment and reduce energy savings for customers during this period,” they wrote. “We expect the result will be higher electric bills and less investment.”


Filed under: Article, Business & Technology, Climate & Energy
Categories: Environment

Vena Solutions Appoints Tim Dearden as Chief Strategy Officer to Drive...

PR Web - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 14:06

Rapid international growth necessitates creation of top strategy role for rising Corporate Performance Management SaaS vendor

(PRWeb June 05, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11896000.htm

Categories: Environment

Vena Solutions Welcomes Darrell Cox as CFO

PR Web - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 14:06

New executive team member brings wealth of experience to growing CPM software vendor.

(PRWeb June 05, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11915146.htm

Categories: Environment

Civic Works Provides A Solution To Food Deserts In Baltimore

PR Web - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 14:06

NBC'S Weekend TODAY Features Real Food Farm's Mobile Farmers Market

(PRWeb June 05, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11907324.htm

Categories: Environment

Adventure Life Offers Special Discounts on Worldwide Cruises

PR Web - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 14:06

Adventure Life announces special discounts on all AMAWaterways cruises. These discounts are available to travelers that book a trip on one of these luxury ships by July 31st.

(PRWeb June 05, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11912570.htm

Categories: Environment

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