Environment

Ten Students Begin Studies in Online Rabbinical School: Tenth class...

PR Web - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 07:11

The Jewish Spiritual Leaders’ Institute (JSLI) Online Rabbinical School has matriculated its 10th class of rabbinical students. These students will receive their semicha, or certificate of ordination,...

(PRWeb March 11, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12564895.htm

Categories: Environment

Clean Water Systems Supply New No-Waste-Water Treatment Systems Help...

PR Web - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 07:11

Due to extreme drought in many states in the U.S., water conservation and reduction of wasted water by homes and business has never been more important. Clean Water Systems & Stores Inc of Santa...

(PRWeb March 11, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12571486.htm

Categories: Environment

Gulf Coast Air Care Selected as Business of the Month by Gulf Breeze...

PR Web - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 07:11

Local service company, Gulf Coast Air Care, chosen as Business of the Month for February 2015 as a result of outstanding service helping homeowners with indoor air quality issues. The Chamber members...

(PRWeb March 11, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12571877.htm

Categories: Environment

PwC US and RAFT Working to Engage Students in Financial Literacy...

PR Web - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 07:11

Resource Area For Teaching (RAFT), a nonprofit organization, introduces new hands-on activities that allow students to both explore financial literacy and enhance the PwC Earn Your Future commitment.

(PRWeb March 11, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12572061.htm

Categories: Environment

"In America" with host James Earl Jones will feature a new...

PR Web - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 07:11

New content to discuss important aspects of clean water...

(PRWeb March 11, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12573372.htm

Categories: Environment

Margaret Redfern looks to expand readership with marketing push

PR Web - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 07:11

New marketing push ‘Maddie’s Magic Tree’ follows young girl learning about true gift of giving

(PRWeb March 11, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/MargaretRedfern/MaddiesMagicTree/prweb12576152.htm

Categories: Environment

Author Applies Wisdom from Biblical Matriarchs to Altar Calls

PR Web - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 07:11

New book ‘The Ministry of Women at the Altar’ invites readers to approach altar calls with new perspective.

(PRWeb March 11, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/NederlandMFulgencio/03/prweb12576170.htm

Categories: Environment

The Road to Hope, with Teen Student Philanthropists, Announce Opening...

PR Web - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 07:11

Students to Travel to Open New School, Bring Art/Instruments, on St. Patrick's Day.

(PRWeb March 11, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12572310.htm

Categories: Environment

Maricopa Community Colleges Provost Named a 2015 National Aspen...

PR Web - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 07:11

Maricopa Community Colleges Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost Dr. Maria Harper-Marinick has been selected to join the 2015 class of Aspen Institute Ascend Fellows.

(PRWeb March 10, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/mcccd/ascendfellow/prweb12570971.htm

Categories: Environment

Estrella Mountain Community College Science Faculty Makes Physics a...

PR Web - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 07:11

The American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) has awarded Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) faculty, Dr. Dwain Desbien, the 2015 David Halliday and Robert Resnick Award for Excellence...

(PRWeb March 10, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/mcccd/emccdesbien/prweb12572278.htm

Categories: Environment

Percentage Of Cash Sales Fall By 0.5% In December 2014

PR Web - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 07:11

Peoples Home Equity comments on a recent article from Corelogic.com highlighting year-over-year cash sales.

(PRWeb March 10, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12576200.htm

Categories: Environment

Physics geniuses, Mexican rappers, LEGO Supreme Court: It’s Woman Crush Wednesday

Grist.org - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 07:05

ICYMI: Grist officially decided to take over Woman Crush Wednesday last week, so from here on out, we’ll be delivering a weekly roundup of  women in the news straight to you. Because who doesn’t like to read about women kicking ass and taking names when it comes to science, activism, agriculture, and climate change? Swoon.

This past Sunday, March 8, was International Women’s Day — although, it’s worth mentioning that because of Daylight Savings in the good ol’ US of A, we couldn’t even get a whole 24 hours to celebrate womanhood. Typical. To make up for that, we hope you take a whole hour today to relax and enjoy our WCW roundup for this week — ladies, you deserve it!

Here’s who we’ve been crushing on this week:

  • Danielle Deane, director of the Green 2.0 initiative, which just released a study highlighting the need for greater diversity within the environmental movement. Most of the 300 environmental organizations surveyed across the country were largely white, the study found, with people of color making up at most 16 percent of staff. (New American Media)
  • Susana Molina, aka Oveja Negra (Black Sheep), a Mexican rapper who spits verses on women’s justice issues. Be sure to check out the other women profiled for International Woman’s day, like Oumaima Erhali, a 17-year-old Moroccan woman who wants to get more Muslim women on surfboards, while you’re at it. (AJ+)
  • Zahra Haghani, the 27-year-old Iranian woman and physics phenom who could be well on her way to becoming the next Einstein. Try to wrap your noggin around her gravitational theory here. (Forbes)
  • Donna Brazile, the Rev. Leah D. Daughtry, Minyon Moore, Yolanda H. Caraway, and Tina Flournoy: five politicos who call themselves the “Colored Girls.” For almost 30 years, these women have been behind-the-scenes powerhouses in Democratic politics, working as lead consultants for presidential campaigns and holding senior roles at the Democratic National Committee  — all while pushing for more minority inclusion in politics. Right on. (The New York Times)
  • Maia Weinstock, deputy editor at MIT News, who created a custom set of Legos representing each woman on the Supreme Court. Coined the Legal Justice League, the set includes sitting Supreme Court Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan, plus Sandra Day O’Connor, the Court’s first female Justice, who retired in 2006. (Business Insider)

Stay tuned for next week’s roundup!

Maia Weinstock
Filed under: Living, Politics
Categories: Environment

WTUI Conference to Feature Turbine Inspection Technology

PR Web - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 04:11

The VJ-Advance video borescope will be traveling cross-country next week for the Western Turbine Users Inc. (WTUI) Conference, taking place in Long Beach, CA. Stop by RF System Lab’s exhibit at booth...

(PRWeb March 10, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12575293.htm

Categories: Environment

Eye Of The Day Garden Design Center’s Art In The Garden & Water...

PR Web - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 04:11

Eye of the Day Garden Design Center hosts showcase for sculptor Bobbie Carlyle along with Verdure and the Grand Opening of their synthetic turf display. Additional speakers on eco-friendly practices...

(PRWeb March 10, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12575874.htm

Categories: Environment

EnviroForensics’ Megan Hamilton to Present on Impacts of Vapor...

PR Web - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 04:11

March 23 – 25, Megan Hamilton, Risk Assessor and Vapor Intrusion Specialist at Enviroforensics, will be...

(PRWeb March 10, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12563797.htm

Categories: Environment

Mobile Integrations Now Changing the Recruitment Industry

PR Web - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 04:11

Async Interview finds 1 in 10 companies turn to mobile technology to reach top talent.

(PRWeb March 10, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/mobile/video_interviews/prweb12572014.htm

Categories: Environment

Organic Valley Announces First Organic Snacking Cheese for Adults

PR Web - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 04:11

Organic Valley Snack Sticks in Medium Cheddar and Pepper Jack; Premium Cheese Snacks for Grown-Ups!

(PRWeb March 10, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12575526.htm

Categories: Environment

The South Bronx isn’t falling for Fresh Direct’s dirty trucks

Grist.org - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 00:07

Another day, another tale of social and environmental injustice.

This one takes us to the South Bronx, where residents are trying to keep Fresh Direct, a popular food delivery service, from setting up shop in their neighborhood and flooding their streets with delivery trucks.

The company, currently based in Queens, dispatches trucks full of high-end groceries to residents in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, and Delaware. In 2012, it announced plans to move its warehouse to the South Bronx, a densely populated, low-income neighborhood in New York’s poorest borough, and as a preemptive “You’re welcome!” promised to bring with it up to 1,000 new jobs (that don’t pay very well). Company reps also told the borough president that it would give at least 30 percent of those jobs to local residents, although they’re not legally bound to that.

Here’s the problem: the company would also bring about 1,000 new trucks to the neighborhood, which is bad news for an area already home to high asthma rates and heavy industry — there’s a sewage treatment plant, a FedEx hub, a waste-transfer station, some of the busiest wholesale food markets in the world, and multiple major expressways, including the Cross Bronx, which is notoriously backed up all the time.

South Bronx resident Arthur Mychal Johnson lives near the waterfront where Fresh Direct plans to move. Back in 2012, he co-founded the community group South Bronx Unite to oppose Fresh Direct because, as he told The Guardian:

“Of course we want jobs, but we should not have to choose between having a job and having clean air. If you can’t breathe, you can’t work. Why is that not obvious?”

Between 2002 and 2005, New York University researchers attached air pollution monitors to the backpacks of asthmatic kids in the South Bronx to see what kind of air they were breathing. Not surprisingly, it was pretty bad. Traffic fumes were a big problem; some kids occasionally registered levels of diesel emissions that exceeded what the EPA considers safe (and legal).

But studies are boring! Remember those 1,000 low-paying jobs? City officials sure do. Back in 2012, the city promised Fresh Direct a $130 million incentive package boosting the local economy. The new mayor, Bill de Blasio, campaigned against such subsidies but hasn’t done much about them since taking office, according to The Guardian.

At a public hearing last November, city officials considered giving the company an additional $10 million in subsidies. Locals showed up to the meeting to raise hell and succeeded in convincing the officials to reconsider. Johnson of South Bronx Unite recalled the victory in his interview with The Guardian:

“We wanted them to hear our impassioned plea to do something different, to think about kids in this community who keep missing school and who can’t play outdoors because they have asthma.”

Still, Fresh Direct broke ground in the South Bronx last December, and last month, city officials voted to approve the additional subsidies. South Bronx Unite will continue to fight Fresh Direct, and even if the company does move to the neighborhood (let’s face it, it probably will), Johnson says the group plans to restore and greenify other parts of the surrounding waterfront.

According to its website, Fresh Direct currently has 10 electric trucks in its fleet and plans to make its trucks “100 percent green” within five years. That would certainly be a good thing for the South Bronx, but it wouldn’t negate the injustice of the company moving there now, before greening its fleet.

It’s kind of like if I were to go your house and rip up your lawn without your permission and then later decide to go back and plant you a nice vegetable garden. You might appreciate the vegetable garden, but it wouldn’t change the fact that ripping up your lawn in the first place was a dick move.


Filed under: Business & Technology, Cities, Food
Categories: Environment

Why bike lanes are battle lines for justice

Grist.org - Tue, 03/10/2015 - 23:33

Marven Norman, 26, started biking to and from his job as a substitute teacher outside of L.A. because it was cheaper than driving. He quickly discovered, however, the ride was both uncomfortable and dangerous.

San Bernardino County, where Norman lives, has some of the highest poverty levels in the country. The transportation infrastructure is in a poor state, too: Roads are overbuilt and chronically congested, making for some of the most unhealthy air in the nation, and bike lanes are few and far between.

So a few years ago, Norman started researching ways to improve bike safety in underserved neighborhoods in the area. Now, he serves as the president of a regional bike alliance that pushes not just for safer biking, but equity as well. “Changing the infrastructure falls into three categories,” he told me in an email: “safety, health, and saving money.”

Norman and nine other bike equity advocates are part of a new report on bicycle equity, released by PeopleForBikes and the Alliance for Biking & Walking. The reports —  a bicycling participation report and an “idea book” for building equity in urban areas — use statistics and personal stories to show that poor communities and communities of color use bikes the most, but have some of the worst infrastructure around.

Just how unjust are our streets? We’ll let the facts speak:

Nationally, the report states, the lowest-income households bike the most. In fact, the lower your income, the less likely you are to drive — and not necessarily by choice. As of 2012, according to a study out of the University of Michigan’s Transportation Research Institute, 9 percent of the U.S. population has no access to a car.

More biking may not be a bad thing: Cycling is good for your health, local air quality, and businesses, and a host of other things. But consider the makeup of children biking in dense traffic areas in California, Norman’s home state: 56 percent are Hispanic, 11 percent are African American, and 12 percent are Asian — while only 21 percent are White. (Whites make up 39 percent of California’s population, over all.)

Bike Equity

When it comes to bike safety, Hispanics are more likely than any other U.S. ethnic groups to die in a bike accident, followed by blacks.

Clearly, we need better infrastructure, especially in poor communities and communities of color. In particular, the reports recommend installing more protected bike lanes — that is, lanes that are separated from cars with a traffic barrier — which are safer for both drivers and bikers.

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again — building better bikeways empowers people by giving them more autonomy and increasing mobility for no-car households. And making biking safer for the millions of people of color who are already biking could save hundreds of lives each year.

The “idea book” presents ways cities around the world are making biking safer: In New York, roads are being redesigned with narrower traffic lanes and left-turn bays; in Pittsburgh, white posts separate bikes and auto traffic along a main road; in Seattle’s most diverse neighborhood, advocates are setting up protected lane demos and encouraging citizens to call for action.

The report isn’t a collection of success stories, though: It’s inspiration for further action. The trick, says Norman, is to find the political will to set these projects in motion. “The only road to equitable engineering,” he wrote, “is for more biking advocates and government workers to spend time in Black and Brown communities.”


Filed under: Article, Cities
Categories: Environment

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