Environment

AngelDress: Special Summer, Special Lace Wedding Dresses For 2014

PR Web - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 12:10

AngelDress is happy to announce its latest items, special lace wedding dresses for 2014. Last week, the professional company has also launched a promotion for these new items.

(PRWeb July 11, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12011651.htm

Categories: Environment

Cheap Teal Evening Dresses For Sale At iFitDress.com

PR Web - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 12:10

Recently, iFitDress.com, one of the most famous dress suppliers in the world, has announced its new assortment of quality teal evening dresses. To top it all, these amazing evening gowns are available...

(PRWeb July 11, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12011679.htm

Categories: Environment

Worldwide Chic Ladies Can Buy Cheap Evening Dresses at iFitDress.com

PR Web - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 12:10

Recently, iFitDress.com, a leading online supplier of wedding dresses and women’s special occasion outfits, has released its new collection of evening dresses for 2014. In addition to that, the...

(PRWeb July 11, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12011687.htm

Categories: Environment

Wild by Nature Opens New Location

PR Web - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 12:10

The natural and organic supermarket, owned by King Kullen but operated independently, is opening a new location in West Islip.

(PRWeb July 11, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12009124.htm

Categories: Environment

Naomi Chitambira’s New Book Shows Beauty in Every Woman

PR Web - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 12:10

‘Every Woman is Born with a Crown’ exposes unrealistic standards of beauty.

(PRWeb July 11, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/NaomiChitambira/EveryWomanIsBornWithCrown/prweb12011543.htm

Categories: Environment

Cowboys, hunters, and enviros team up to fight natural gas drilling

Grist.org - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 11:07

If you take off in a plane from the airport in Aspen, Colo., you’ll soon see exactly what natural gas drilling looks like — and exactly why so many residents of the surrounding region, from ranchers to business owners to greens, are fighting to keep it in check.

Fly north over the Thompson Divide, a region mostly contained within the White River National Forest, and all you see is green, lush mountains and valleys. This is a habitat for migratory species from birds to elk.

Bruce Gordon / EcoFlight

Continue on, and tilt a bit west, and you enter the Piceance (pronounced “Pee-once”) Basin. There you see patches of denuded brown dirt with long thin lines leading to them, like the pitcher’s mound on a baseball field. These are some of Colorado’s roughly 30,000 active gas wells, and the roads built to service them. (Many thanks to EcoFlight, a nonprofit environmental education group, for showing me the views.)

Bruce Gordon / EcoFlight

Gradually, over the course of recent years, the drilling has spread eastward, over each successive hill. Now residents in the Thompson Divide area are worried it will come down to their communities and soon their pristine landscape will look like their neighbors’ to the west. The threat has been hanging over them for a decade, but they are now trying to round up the votes in Congress to roll it back.

In 2003, the Bush administration unexpectedly issued 81 mineral leases in the area covering approximately 105,000 acres. Many sold for the statutory minimum of $2 per acre. President Bush’s subservience to fossil fuel interests is one possible reason for the low price, but it was also because the natural gas in the area is expensive to extract, so companies weren’t willing to pay much for the right to do so. Gas prices still haven’t risen enough to make drilling here economical, so a decade has elapsed without any drilling actually taking place. The leases were for 10 years, but some got an extension from the Bureau of Land Management last year, so now there are 61 active leases.

The Thompson Divide Coalition, a grassroots organization of local farmers, ranchers, business owners, and environmentalists, is fighting to revoke the remaining leases permanently. The group contends that it makes no economic sense for the government to let gas companies hold on indefinitely to leases they aren’t using. Be that as it may, the coalition’s more compelling argument is that drilling would be devastating to their local environment and economy. The White River National Forest starts right at the top of Aspen Mountain. The area’s main economic activities are tourism, outdoor recreation, and cattle ranching. All would be under threat by gas drilling that could pollute the local air and water and would require building roads and filling them with trucks. Constructing and servicing a well, especially a fracking well, can require dozens of truck trips back and forth per day. No one wants to hunt, hike, fish, or cross-country ski in an area with pungent, loud drilling operations and frequent truck traffic.

For the owners of adjacent ranches, the impact could be just as immediate. They graze their cattle in the White River National Forest, and they might no longer be able to if the area were drilled. Around the country, cattle have died after drinking water contaminated with fracking fluid.

Bill Fales, 61, looks like Mad Men’s Roger Sterling would if he went into ranching. Tall, lean, gray-haired, with piercing blue eyes and a lined face under his cowboy hat, Fales runs a 700-acre ranch in Carbondale, Colo., with his wife Marj, who grew up on the land. They now sell their grass-fed beef to Whole Foods. They were among the first organizers of the Thompson Divide Coalition.

“We’re pretty terrified by [drilling],” says Fales. “We’re worried about the quality of our water. Just the perception of contamination kills our grass-fed market.” In New York City, Fales notes, some restaurants stopped buying beef from farms upstate as soon as the threat of fracking nearby materialized. Fales adds that herding his cattle would be difficult if the area were broken up with roads and filled with traffic.

All of this has brought together a slightly unusual coalition against drilling in the area: hunters and cowboys holding hands with environmental organizations like the Wilderness Workshop, an advocacy group focused on the White River National Forest.

Sen. Michael Bennet (D-Colo.) introduced a bill last year that would protect the Thompson Divide from any future lease sales and set up a process for allowing the community to buy current leases from the gas companies and retire them. Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper (D) and Sen. Mark Udall (D) have announced their support for the legislation. A similar bill focused on Wyoming land passed and was signed into law in 2009 with Republican support. Still, getting Bennet’s bill through the Senate will be hard: The Energy and Natural Resources Committee is chaired by oil-industry booster Mary Landrieu (D-La.) and includes pro–fossil fuel Democrat Joe Manchin (W.Va.) as well as Republican members. Back-channel negotiations between drilling opponents and gas companies are ongoing, and an agreement that removes industry opposition to Bennet’s bill could round up some support from Republicans and industry-friendly Democrats. But getting anything out of this polarized Congress, and especially the GOP-led House, is never a safe bet.

So the Thompson Divide Coalition and its allies are pursuing another approach as well: They’re petitioning the BLM to revoke all 61 remaining leases. They argue that the BLM did not perform the legally required environmental reviews back in 2003 and citizens were not given proper warning and an opportunity to comment on the leasing plans. The BLM itself admits that the review process was “deficient,” so in April of last year it suspended the leases for two years while it figures out whether that means the leases should be revoked or extended. Getting the BLM to rule that the leases should never have been granted would force the gas companies to come to the table and negotiate a settlement.

The Thompson Divide’s defenders are waging a PR battle too. They’re lobbying in Washington, and organizing in Colorado and online. The Thompson Divide Coalition commissioned a study last year that found hunting, fishing, grazing, and recreation in the Thompson Divide create nearly 300 jobs and $30 million a year in economic value. They argue, also, that those industries are more sustainable than natural resource extraction. “People come because it’s so scenic, and they won’t come if it’s been destroyed,” says Fales. “We’re not a boom-and-bust business. Western Colorado has seen a lot of boom-and-bust mineral development.” Indeed, Carbondale has always served as a bedroom community to Aspen. The area was developed in the late 1800s when Aspen had a boom in silver mining and Carbondale was its agricultural breadbasket. Then Carbondale experienced a coal mining boom, which literally exploded with a methane leak that killed 15 miners in 1981. The town suffered after the industry shut down, until Aspen’s tourism economy and the influx of service workers revived it.

The Thompson Divide’s defenders make arguments about money, because that is what politicians respond to. But the bigger issue is their connection to the land.

Given the striking views of Mount Sopris from their driveway and their proximity to Aspen, the Fales’s could sell their property for millions of dollars to a developer of luxury vacation homes and get out now, before any potential drilling has started. Instead, they have put a conservation easement on their property and stayed to fight it out with the gas companies. When asked about moving, Fales just shakes his head and says, “This is our home.”

—–

Watch EcoFlight‘s virtual tour of the Thompson Divide area:


Filed under: Article, Climate & Energy, Politics
Categories: Environment

Utilities to battery-powered solar: Get off our lawn

Grist.org - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 10:51

In Wisconsin, utilities are jacking up the price to connect to their electrical grid. In Oklahoma, utilities pushed through a law this spring that allows them to charge the people who own solar panels and wind turbines more to connect to their electrical grid. In Arizona, the state has decided to charge extra property taxes to households that are leasing solar panels.

Welcome to the solar backlash. In Grist’s “Utilities for Dummies” series last year, David Roberts prophesied that solar and other renewables could “lay waste to U.S. power utilities and burn the utility business model, which has remained virtually unchanged for a century, to the ground.” And lo, it is coming to pass — though not without a fight from the utilities first.

This May, Barclays downgraded its rating of America’s electricity sector from “market weight” to “underweight.” Its rationale? Solar — or, more specifically, the great leaps that are happening or expected to happen in technology for storing the energy that solar generates. While the solar industry took a roller-coaster ride over the last decade, the R&D that went into electric cars created the killer add-on it was waiting for: really awesome batteries.

It’s not a coincidence that Tesla formed a sales partnership last year with the solar panel development giant Solar City. The two companies are basically smushing solar panels and fancy electric cars together to create a Transformers-like superhouse that could join with similar houses to form a microgrid, no utility necessary. In their utopia, a house could be powered in the off-hours by the battery from the car parked in the garage. Or, if you’re not car people, you could just buy the battery. Tesla is claiming that the cost of their batteries will drop in half by 2020.

For this reason, it’s not surprising that some utilities are specifically going after solar arrays with batteries. In California, utilities are demanding that any solar panel installation that features batteries add an extra meter just for the battery (which adds about $1300 to the overall cost of the installation) before it can be allowed to sell electricity back to the grid.

PG&E, the company that owns California’s biggest utility, refuses outright to buy energy from customers that have both solar panels and batteries, as does San Diego Gas & Electric. The utility companies argue that such storage systems could, in theory, be used fraudulently: Consumers with solar panels could fill their batteries directly with power sourced from the grid during times when the power is cheap and then send it back under a false “clean” label during periods of high demand when it’s worth more. (Although solar suppliers say no one is actually gaming the system this way, the industry admits that the technology has outpaced monitoring policies.)

It makes sense that utilities are freaking out about the risk of solar. Today, 43 states require utilities to buy electricity from consumer solar installations, typically at the same price that customers pay for power from the grid. Utilities argue that this arrangement is unfair to them, because they have to maintain a ton of infrastructure (power lines, power plants) that a cute house with a solar panel does not. However, utilities have typically had decades of low-cost loans and steady regulated profits, plus some opportunities for crazy price-gouging here and there, precisely because of this infrastructure. In most cases, it has already more than paid for itself.

If solar achieves anywhere near its projected growth, utilities stand to lose a lot of money. But by working against solar, instead of with it, they risk creating a two-tiered system — one where people who are wealthy or organized enough separate from the grid entirely and link together in little gated communities, and one where people who can’t get it together enough to install a fancy solar array end up paying higher and higher utility prices on a steadily shrinking network — sort of like how poor people get stuck paying higher gas prices because they don’t have the $25,000 to own a Prius, or higher utilities because they can’t afford the outlay for energy-efficient anything.

Which is to say, there are changes coming, and the next few years will determine the shape of the energy system of the future. Of course, our need to cut carbon emissions is urgent enough that we just might want to say to the utilities: Get out of the way. And if there ever was a time to run for your local public utilities commission, it’s now.


Filed under: Article, Climate & Energy
Categories: Environment

Mesothelioma Victims Center Urges a New National Focus on Mesothelioma...

PR Web - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 09:10

The Mesothelioma Victims Center is calling for a new national focus on a rare form of cancer called mesothelioma, because they fear...

(PRWeb July 11, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11903070.htm

Categories: Environment

Austin Company Joins EasyTurf's Select List

PR Web - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 09:10

EasyTurf, Inc. today named Texas Irrigation Supply an EasyTurf Authorized Reseller

(PRWeb July 11, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12004820.htm

Categories: Environment

SEO Consultancy Ltd To Open Workshops For Small Business Owners

PR Web - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 09:10

SEO Consultancy Ltd a SEO Company in London is to hold Workshops for business owners who need help in positioning themselves on the internet correctly.

(PRWeb July 11, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/SEO-Company/SEO-Consultancy-Ltd/prweb12008772.htm

Categories: Environment

Rent Prices Climb While Income Remains Stagnant

PR Web - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 09:10

The Federal Savings Bank share news to informs readers that buying a home is becoming more attractive than paying rent.

(PRWeb July 11, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12011435.htm

Categories: Environment

Southern Plumbing Announces New Sewer Replacement Services for Systems...

PR Web - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 09:10

Sewer Replacement Services for Systems Damaged by Roots from Southern Plumbing

(PRWeb July 11, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12000393.htm

Categories: Environment

Vote Now for Flow Control Magazine’s 2014 Innovation Awards

PR Web - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 09:10

Nominees Represent Top Technology Solutions for Industrial Fluid Handling Applications

(PRWeb July 11, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12005907.htm

Categories: Environment

475 High Performance Building Supply Debuts New Website as a Resource...

PR Web - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 09:10

Foursevenfive.com aims to be a hub for building knowledge and components.

(PRWeb July 11, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/475/HighPerformanceBuilding/prweb12010412.htm

Categories: Environment

Record Breaking 29 hours at $0 for FELPower Real-Time Energy Customers

PR Web - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 09:10

Freedom Energy Logistics (FEL) and Halifax American Energy Company (HAEC) Real-Time customers in New England enjoyed a record breaking 29 $0 dollar hours between July 5th and July 6th.

(PRWeb July 11, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12010524.htm

Categories: Environment

Forbes Living Showcases Hottest Home and Family Trends on WE tv

PR Web - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 09:10

Forbes Living showcases the hottest home and family trends, airing July 18 at 7:00 A.M. ET/PT on WE tv.

(PRWeb July 11, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/forbes-living-showcases-/home-trends-july18/prweb12010595.htm

Categories: Environment

WCS Acquires Snake Guard® Snake Traps

PR Web - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 09:10

Wildlife Control Supplies has assumed production of the Snake Guard® snake trap product from Snakeguard, LLC, of Birmingham, AL

(PRWeb July 11, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12007008.htm

Categories: Environment

Trendy But Cheap Sandals For Women Online Now At Dresswe.com

PR Web - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 06:10

Today, Dresswe.com announces its new collection of cheap women’s sandals, and launched a special offer on these new items.

(PRWeb July 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12006470.htm

Categories: Environment

“Bicycle face” for the modern woman

Grist.org - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 00:37

This week, Vox published a great piece on a (completely imaginary) 19th century phenomenon called “bicycle face.” In a nutshell: Doctors in the late 1800s invented a velocipedically induced physical condition to dissuade women from riding bikes:

“Over-exertion, the upright position on the wheel, and the unconscious effort to maintain one’s balance tend to produce a wearied and exhausted ‘bicycle face,’” noted the Literary Digest in 1895. It went on to describe the condition: “usually flushed, but sometimes pale, often with lips more or less drawn, and the beginning of dark shadows under the eyes, and always with an expression of weariness.” Elsewhere, others said the condition was “characterized by a hard, clenched jaw and bulging eyes.”

Fair enough — keeping one’s balance sure is hard! Especially for those of us with uteri, because of our confused and equilibrium-challenged lady-brains.

This got me thinking about different conditions that threaten the modern urban woman trying to get from Point A to Point B. Henceforth, a brief catalogue:

“Cab-Exiting” Face: “I just paid 45 AMERICAN DOLLARS to take a 15-minute taxi ride, and now I have to awkwardly shuffle across this nasty leather seat with my knees clenched together to make sure that none of the 900 strangers on this sidewalk get a view of my vagina. Did I even remember to put on underwear this morning? Fuck.”

“Your Gym Bag Is Taking Up Two Seats On This Packed Subway” Face: “Whoever made these shoes is a certifiable sadist. But hey, my having to stand makes sense — your putrid, enormous Nikes are absolutely more valuable than my feet. I have now lost 80 percent of the feeling in my toes.”

“Did You Seriously Just Drive RIGHT Past This Designated Bus Stop?” Face: “I have been waiting here for 25 minutes. It is somehow raining and hailing at the same time. I KNOW that you saw me, bus driver, because we made eye contact, but then I think I saw horns magically come out of your head.”

“My Two Options Right Now Are Uber Surge Pricing Or A Bus That Now Comes Once Every Two Hours” Face: “This is why you should never, ever let anyone convince you to stay out past 2:00 a.m.”

Keep in mind, ladies — all of these are potentially permanent and therefore detrimental to your physical appearance, which is your single most valuable asset.


Filed under: Cities, Living
Categories: Environment

Portable Communication Systems Market Projected to Reach $39.52...

PR Web - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 00:09

The man-portable communication systems market research report categorizes the market on the basis of telemetry application, region, country, forecasting revenues, market share, and analyzing trends in...

(PRWeb July 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/portable-communication/system-market/prweb12008482.htm

Categories: Environment

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