Environment

Oxford City Football Club, Inc. (OTCQB:OXFC) Set to Hold Press...

PR Web - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 15:21

Oxford City FC of Texas will unveil new signings and officially announce the MCM Eleganté as a Hotel Sponsor.

(PRWeb October 23, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/10/prweb12270488.htm

Categories: Environment

Larson Electronics Releases a New Handheld Spotlight with a Green Lens...

PR Web - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 15:21

Larson Electronics unveils a new green 100 watt halogen handheld spotlight just in time for hunting season. The HL-85-GREEN is a lightweight, ultra rugged, ergonomic handheld spotlight that operates...

(PRWeb October 23, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/larsonelectronics/ledspotlight/prweb12271529.htm

Categories: Environment

Zepyor Parseghian Contributes To Green Energy By Donating A Solar...

PR Web - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 15:21

International deal will cut electricity bills for 4,500 homes in Santa Clarita by around $40m

(PRWeb October 23, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/10/prweb12272160.htm

Categories: Environment

New Technology from CATALYST Helps to Save Thousands in Energy Costs...

PR Web - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 15:21

Cutting edge technology that is revolutionizing the way commercial buildings consume energy. Proven to reduce utilities by 50% without the expense of upgrading equipment or staff, the Catalyst System...

(PRWeb October 23, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/10/prweb12268024.htm

Categories: Environment

Jersey Shore Cosmetics Unveils Fall/Winter Beauty Essentials

PR Web - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 12:21

A Hydrating Trio that Addresses Your Lips and Hands

(PRWeb October 23, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/10/prweb12253852.htm

Categories: Environment

altE Hires New Warehouse Manager for Expanded Distribution Center and...

PR Web - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 12:21

Industry veteran Tom Baker selected to lead growing warehouse operations.

(PRWeb October 23, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/10/prweb12271111.htm

Categories: Environment

Prop 65 News and Compliance & Risks to Host a Webinar on Chemical...

PR Web - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 12:21

The webinar covers regulatory trends in the U.S. and abroad for chemicals commonly used in consumer products and new chemical listings and regulatory actions that may impact compliance with...

(PRWeb October 23, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/10/prweb12271437.htm

Categories: Environment

Food giants Cargill and General Mills believe in climate change. Will they defend themselves from it?

Grist.org - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 12:09

When I think about companies like Cargill and General Mills, I don’t exactly imagine a den of climate hawks. So I’ve been surprised to see a string of announcements from food industry giants about their environmental initiatives. When Greg Page, the executive chair of Cargill, wrote an op-ed in the Des Moines Register entitled “Agriculture must engage in climate change discussion,” I rubbed my eyes and reread to make sure I hadn’t missed a “not” in there.

The current Congress won’t do anything on climate change, I thought, but maybe businesses are moving past the politicians on this. Maybe a company like Cargill, apprehending the risks of severe weather to its business, would help elect politicians who accept science.

In recent years, even reasonable Republicans have leaned toward outright climate change denial. Cargill generally supports Republicans. Perhaps pressure from prudent big businesses could provide a counterweight to anti-science populism? Here are Cargill’s political donations:

Graph by Influence Explorer

When I asked to interview Page about all this, it took a while to set up. In the meantime, I looked up Cargill’s policy on climate change and reread the editorial, and I saw that I was being too optimistic. Page carefully skirts any firm statement on what’s causing climate change, or any discussion of what the solutions might be. When we spoke I asked him directly: Do you say publicly that humans are causing climate change?

“Nope” was his succinct answer. “I don’t think it would be helpful … The failing of a lot of prior efforts had to do with starting with a prescription and then gathering up a set of data to support that prescription versus coming at it the other way.”

Of course climate scientists did start with the data. Then, after more than 100 years of looking at the evidence, 97 percent of them came to the same conclusion about a prescription: We need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. I mean, how much more dialogue and analysis do we need?

But as I listened to Page, I realized he had a truly valuable insight here. To people who haven’t made up their minds about climate change, that 97 percent talking point is just a talking point, because they haven’t been invested in that 100-year process. I was reminded of the GMO debate: You can’t tell people simply to accept the conclusions of the scientific experts — we’re just not wired to outsource our decision-making abilities like that. Instead, you start by figuring out what people want to achieve, and then you get them to study the science as a means to achieve those goals.

This all started for Cargill when it began participating in the Risky Business project — put together by billionaire climate activist Tom Steyer, former New York Mayor Mike Bloomberg, and former Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson. Pretty soon, a lot of AM-radio-listening farmers were asking what Page was doing hanging out with liberals and talking publicly about climate change.

“Have I gotten some hate mail? Yes,” Page said. “But we address it, and go back and say, hey, would you prefer that Cargill had not joined with Hank Paulson and others to think about this and talk about an array of outcomes? The thing about Risky Business that we liked: they weren’t going to come with a prescription. They were instead going to use the same kinds of risk tools that financial institutions and companies like Cargill use to assess a host of outcomes that are possible — assign probabilities to them, and then assign costs to them.”

When Page meets with suspicious farmers he takes a different starting point: They all want to succeed and make money. It only makes sense that they look at the best science as they try to do that. And now, because they are trying to use the science rather than fight it, they are assessing it with an open mind, looking for the information that is most likely to help them.

It helps to show these people, Page has found, that the science itself isn’t partisan. “There’s something that amazes a lot of farm groups I’ve met with that have had concerns about our participation: In some of the scenarios that are predicted in the next 50 years, agricultural productivity will actually go up. Now, the people writing headlines would probably prefer to talk about the other scenarios where they go down. So, in a world where they don’t write as many headlines about planes landing safely, we didn’t see a lot of coverage of the fact. But if you read the Risky Business report, the array of probable scenarios from the scientists that Paulson and Bloomberg hired, and they were an impressive group, within that range is one that actually predicts an improvement. There are also some that predict some pretty tough sledding for certain regions of the country.”

Conservative farmers are absolutely willing to accept the evidence and act on it, he said. My problem with this is that the actions it generates are adaptations to climate change, not prevention of climate change. Cargill is building more ports around the world, for instance, so that it can ship grain from a well-fed region when droughts or monsoons wipe out a harvest in another. Why not take the next step, I asked, and accept the evidence that people are the cause?

“I think the problem with causality, for a company like Cargill, there are a lot of people who think that the minute that they acknowledge causality, the role of government in their lives will increase,” Page said. “So while they would probably admit, in the sanctity of their own home, that they have observed changes in the weather versus what their father had experienced, getting them to leap across the next divide to say that the primary cause of those changes was the behavior of them and their 7 billion compatriots — that’s a big leap.”

And yet: Other companies are making that leap. General Mills is one of them. I spoke with Jerry Lynch, the chief sustainability officer there, and asked him the same question: Do you say publicly that humans cause climate change?

“Well, all the evidence points that way, doesn’t it?” he said. “We’re not climate scientists, we’re a food company. We just look at the best available science. The best available science tells us all the changes we are making to the planet as a human species is what’s causing this … It goes back to what is our business model. At the highest level, mother nature has got to continue to do well for us to do well. The business case was pretty clear. We just said, hey, these are what the facts are, this is what the best science says. So let’s just get on with it.”

So, um, that’s different.

“I think there’s a real recognition among food companies that this is a real and important issue,” Lynch said. “I can’t say they are contentious conversations about the science.” But when I explained what Page had told me, Lynch agreed, “The approach we take is to try not to get hung up on the specifics of the why.”

There’s at least one important difference between General Mills and Cargill: General Mills sells food like Häagen-Dazs to people like you, who might care about climate change. Cargill sells to farmers and to other companies, like General Mills. So Cargill doesn’t face direct pressure from individual eaters. But it does feel some of that pressure through other companies.

General Mills scrutinizes the greenhouse gas emissions, “from seed to landfill,” Lynch said. “Not just in the enterprises we run, but all the way back up the agricultural supply chain. And through the consumer to the landfill.” So companies like Cargill have been trying to reduce emissions at the behest of their corporate customers.

Does any of this translate into political change? I asked Lynch if General Mills was going to start supporting specific lawmakers depending on their stance on climate change. The answer was, basically: not yet. There’s a lot that can be done outside of politics, he said, and listed a slew of collaborations and roundtables between businesses making real changes right now. For example, Field to Market is a truly massive collaboration with just about every major player in the food system working together.

When I pressed him about the political dimension, Lynch said, “We really do think there is a role for rational government policy in this space. It needs to be effective, it needs to be efficient, and it needs to be proportionate, meaning, it needs to create a level playing field where anyone who should be doing mitigation is doing mitigation.” As soon as there’s a good proposal on the table, Lynch said, General Mills will help legislators trying to move it forward.

My initial hope — that business pressure on conservative politicians would produce a new class of science-championing Republicans — seems unlikely to materialize, at least any time soon. Still, the process of grappling with climate risk analysis is leading the food industry to make important changes, and it’s showing people that they need to at least understand climate science if they care about their own bottom line.

In a roundabout way, this process will eventually get us all on the same page. But that “eventually” sure stings.


Filed under: Article, Business & Technology, Food
Categories: Environment

What’s better, synthetic or standard motor oil?

Grist.org - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 11:03

Q. My new car requires synthetic oil. Rather than change every 5,000 miles, I can go 7,500. Each oil change is a higher cost, but it nearly averages with fewer changes. I use less oil and fewer filters, but what about the overall manufacturing pollutants and carbon footprints of the two oils?

D.H.
Wichita, Kan.

A. Dearest D.,

In the world of persistent myths, “Change your oil every 3,000 miles” ranks right up there with “Don’t go swimming after you eat” and “Liquor before beer, never fear” (my sophomore-year self would love to have a few words with whoever came up with that one). So it’s wonderful to hear you’re already enlightened on the truth about oil changes: There’s no reason to waste time, money, and oil on such frequent flushes, especially with newer vehicles. Depending on what your owner’s manual instructs, you can get anywhere from 5,000 to a whopping 25,000 miles between changes. Numbers like that require the use of synthetic oil over the conventional stuff, though, which brings us to your query.

Some cars, like yours, demand synthetic oil. Many auto experts recommend it for the rest of them chiefly because it lets you extend the interval between oil changes. Why? Let’s back up a minute. Synthetic oil is, as you may have guessed, man-made. Often, it’s cooked up in a lab by chemically converting one type of hydrocarbon molecule into another (called polyalphaolefin oil, or PAO, for the acronym trackers out there). Some brands do come from a crude oil base, just like the standard goop, while others come from natural gas, “agricultural ingredients,” or even beef tallow. Because it’s engineered specifically for engine lubrication, synthetic oil is purer, thinner (the better to grease moving engine parts), stable in temperature extremes, and resistant to breakdown. In short, it’s much better, and therefore lasts much longer, than standard oil.

Conventional oil, on the other hand, is mostly crude (from a petroleum base), with some additives thrown in to help it do its job under your hood. The stuff usually contains some impurities, like sulfur or heavy metals, and thickens and degrades over time, which means more frequent trips to the lube shop.

Synthetic sure sounds like a winner, doesn’t it? But you asked about the impact of manufacturing each type of oil, D., and here’s where the differences get a little slippery. Conventional oil comes from fossil fuel that we’d all do well to avoid, and must be extracted from the ground, shipped, and refined into car-ready shape. But synthetic oil is no angel, either: Its manufacture requires the use of nasty chemicals. Not only that, but the California Environmental Protection Agency reports that it takes three times more energy to produce synthetic oil than to refine conventional oil.

Still, I think you should rest easy knowing your car’s veins pump synthetic. Why? One of the biggest environmental issues with motor oil is what to do with it once it’s spent. A lot of that sludge ends up burned for fuel in power plants or industrial boilers, a dirty process that spews carbon and heavy metals. Some of it ends up leaking and running into our water supplies. And some of it does get recycled into fresh motor oil, the best possible outcome – re-refining oil takes less energy than starting from scratch – but that fate currently awaits only about 10 percent of our supply.

So the less oil we use in our cars, the better. And as synthetic oil lasts up to five times longer than conventional oil, that translates to far fewer quarts that need refining to freshen up your engine, and far fewer quarts that need disposal when the oil finally quits. The longevity of synthetic oil goes a long way toward making up for its higher initial energy use, too.

And that’s not all synthetic has going for it. Because it’s a more effective lubricant, synthetic oil provides a small but appreciable boost in your car’s fuel economy – an improvement of roughly two percent. Those smoothly pumping pistons also cut down on wear and tear on your engine, extending the life of your car and delaying the need for an energy- and resource-intensive replacement. And finally, according to the California EPA, synthetic oil biodegrades more rapidly, reducing the damage if any does seep into a storm drain.

Synthetic oil is far from perfect, D., but so is everything else related to cars. If you’re going to drive, you’re better off doing it with a synthetically humming engine. If you’re after an even bigger environmental impact, park that car and take the bus. But I’ll bet you already knew that.

Frictionlessly,
Umbra


Filed under: Living
Categories: Environment

American Natural Gas Acquires Northville NG Fuels

PR Web - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 09:21

Acquisition includes three CNG fueling stations throughout Indiana.

(PRWeb October 23, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/10/prweb12270709.htm

Categories: Environment

Celebrate a Special Mother-In-Law This October

PR Web - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 09:21

Sunday is Mother-in-Law Day and Garden Media has gift ideas for every kind of "mom"

(PRWeb October 23, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/10/prweb12234531.htm

Categories: Environment

Austin Dumpster Rental Company Currently Recycling and Hauling...

PR Web - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 09:21

At Your Disposal Waste Services, Inc. is currently providing recycling and hauling services to the construction site of a mixed-use development in Austin.

(PRWeb October 23, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/rolloffdumpstersaustin/austindumpsterrentals/prweb12266656.htm

Categories: Environment

Buffalo New York local, and Ex Buffalo Sabre, Grant Ledyard, Has...

PR Web - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 09:21

Grant will be providing the latest in composite hockey stick repair technology making this service available for everyone involved with the game in the Buffalo area. The repair process, developed by...

(PRWeb October 23, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/10/prweb12268079.htm

Categories: Environment

Tibet Vista Will Initiate Brand-new Prairie Trekking Routes in Tibet...

PR Web - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 09:21

In recent years,the environmentally friendly tour has become a major trend in China. To help worldwide tourists better enjoy the beauty of Tibet, Tibet Vista will promote prairie trekking routes in...

(PRWeb October 23, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/10/prweb12268456.htm

Categories: Environment

CNTA Clarified Common Misunderstandings about Travelling in Tibet in...

PR Web - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 09:21

Tribet Vista reaffirms the China National Tourism Administration's recent comments regarding common misconceptions about travelling to Tibet in winter.

(PRWeb October 23, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/10/prweb12268722.htm

Categories: Environment

Create a Supernatural Halloween this Season with Spooky Plants from...

PR Web - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 09:21

Decorate for Halloween with these houseplants from Costa Farms

(PRWeb October 23, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/10/prweb12269776.htm

Categories: Environment

THE BLACK STILETTO: ENDINGS & BEGINNINGS, the Final Action &...

PR Web - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 09:21

THE BLACK STILETTO: ENDINGS & BEGINNINGS, the Final Entry in the Black Stiletto Saga by Raymond Benson will be released on November 4, 2014.

(PRWeb October 23, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/TheBlackStiletto/EndingsandBeginnings/prweb12270538.htm

Categories: Environment

Spireon Introduces GoldStar CMS, Sets New Standard for Vehicle Finance...

PR Web - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 09:21

Powerful, intuitive collateral management solution simplifies loan process for dealers, lenders and buyers

(PRWeb October 23, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/10/prweb12271921.htm

Categories: Environment

Luxury Travel Company, Absolute Travel, Leads Conversation Alongside...

PR Web - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 09:21

Luxury Travel Company, Absolute Travel, Leads Conservation Conversation Alongside Edward Norton and Samson Parashina Shining the Spotlight on...

(PRWeb October 23, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/absoluteawareness/edwardnorton/prweb12267076.htm

Categories: Environment

Mosaic Labs to Provide Carbon Accounting Support to S&P 500 for...

PR Web - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 09:21

Boulder firm will offer response services for sixth consecutive year

(PRWeb October 23, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/10/prweb12267718.htm

Categories: Environment

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