Environment

Same Great Pilates Studio, New Brand - Rock the Reformer

PR Web - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 17:56

Potomac Pilates unveils its new name and brand - Rock the Reformer

(PRWeb July 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12874627.htm

Categories: Environment

Star Renewable Energy Wins the Pitch Perfect Prize at New Low Carbon...

PR Web - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 17:56

Dave Pearson, Director of Star Renewable Energy won the Pitch Perfect Prize for the best presentation at...

(PRWeb July 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12876290.htm

Categories: Environment

VETPAW Reports on Successful Initiative that Saved African Wildlife

PR Web - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 17:56

Veterans’ Mission Leads to More Than 25 Poacher Arrests

(PRWeb July 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12876375.htm

Categories: Environment

SAE International Honors Eight with the Lloyd L. Withrow Distinguished...

PR Web - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 17:56

Eight engineering professionals were honored with the SAE International Lloyd L. Withrow Distinguished Speaker Award. The group received the award during the Awards Ceremony at the SAE 2015 World...

(PRWeb July 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12876669.htm

Categories: Environment

Data Storage Corporation Announces “Smart Archiving”

PR Web - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 17:56

The Message Logic division of Data Storage Corporation delivers world-class email archiving solutions and has introduced its latest Smart Archiving capabilities that address the growing demand for...

(PRWeb July 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12874575.htm

Categories: Environment

Portland activists try to block Shell ship from heading to Arctic

Grist.org - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 16:35

Before sunrise Wednesday morning, Portland kayaktivists and rapellers took to the Willamette River to block the MSV Fennica, a Shell icebreaking vessel that’s been docked in Portland for repairs. The Fennica had planned to ship out today, bound for the Arctic; Shell can’t begin its Arctic drilling until the icebreaker arrives.

Over 50 activists gathered in the water in kayaks and a dozen more repelled from the St. Johns bridge to block the vessel. Since Fennica hasn’t actually left the port, no word yet on how long the fleece-clad spiders plan on hanging from the bridge, but Greenpeace organizer Mary Nicol told the Portland Mercury they have enough food to last for several days.

The Mercury is covering the protest live, or you can follow along on Twitter.

Greenpeace/Flickr Greenpeace/Flickr Greenpeace/Flickr Greenpeace/Flickr
Filed under: Climate & Energy
Categories: Environment

Keep Filth Flies Away this Summer; McCloud Services Provides...

PR Web - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 14:56

Filth flies transport many food borne pathogens; sanitation and exclusion are critical components of a filth fly management program this summer

(PRWeb July 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12869385.htm

Categories: Environment

Paul Davis Offers Tips to Minimize Property Damage and Health Risks...

PR Web - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 14:56

Many threats to people and property remain after a flood occurs

(PRWeb July 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12872124.htm

Categories: Environment

Kast Concrete Knobs Launches 2015 Collection

PR Web - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 14:56

With 10 unique new styles released this week, Kast Concrete Knobs is making its own touch on boring old cabinet hardware.

(PRWeb July 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12874453.htm

Categories: Environment

Sandz Development and @properties Open Sales Center For Webster Square...

PR Web - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 14:56

Sales underway for new-construction luxury condominium building in the heart of Lincoln Park

(PRWeb July 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12875132.htm

Categories: Environment

Athena Sustainable Materials Institute Releases Update to its...

PR Web - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 14:56

The non-profit research collaborative today released Version 5.1 of its free whole-building Life Cycle Assessment tool

(PRWeb July 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12870058.htm

Categories: Environment

World Cumulative Installed Nuclear Power Capacity to Post 2.26% CAGR...

PR Web - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 14:56

New research study “Global Nuclear Power Market 2015-2019” drawn up by Infiniti Research is now available at MarketPublishers.com.

(PRWeb July 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12876221.htm

Categories: Environment

Threat of West Coast Wildfires Extends Beyond the Flames

PR Web - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 14:56

Paul Davis offers tips for protecting people and property in 2015.

(PRWeb July 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12872343.htm

Categories: Environment

Sofia Fund Surpasses Investor Goals

PR Web - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 11:56

Investment Fund Focused on Early Stage, Women Led Growth Companies Ignites!

(PRWeb July 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12872794.htm

Categories: Environment

Fastline Publications to Partner with American Farmer in Upcoming...

PR Web - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 11:56

DMG Productions explores recent breakthroughs in agricultural marketing and advertising.

(PRWeb July 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12870786.htm

Categories: Environment

Watch This Short Film Break Down the $7.6 Billion Bid to Build...

PR Web - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 11:56

"36 Inches" explores the impacts of Oregon’s proposed Jordan Cove Energy Project on domestic gas prices, eminent domain, and major emissions in the context of what some are calling...

(PRWeb July 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12875736.htm

Categories: Environment

Duct Sealing Technology From Berkeley Lab Provides First Solution To...

PR Web - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 11:56

Aerosol-based Duct Sealing Application Improves Poor Ventilation / Reduces Operating Costs For High-Rises, Public Buildings and Commercial Properties

(PRWeb July 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12869568.htm

Categories: Environment

Next Step Living Urges Mass. Legislature to Raise Solar Net Metering...

PR Web - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 11:56

Amendment to Raise Cap Recently Adopted in Senate; Bill Needs to Pass House to Create Green Jobs and Reduce Carbon Footprint

(PRWeb July 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12875533.htm

Categories: Environment

Why do we turn up our noses at eating bugs?

Grist.org - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 09:00

In 1845, John C. Fremont was exploring the state that would later come to be known as California. He met a man who had been traveling with a group of trappers, who told him a story. The trappers had run out of food, and decided that the best way out of their predicament was to steal several bags of dried fish from a nearby Native American camp.

So they did. The trappers made dinner. The trappers made breakfast. Then one of them looked at the fish a little more closely. It wasn’t fish at all. It was maggots, pounded into a thin paste and dried.

“The stomachs of the stout trappers were not proof against their prejudices,” wrote Fremont, “The repulsive food was suddenly rejected.”

Recently, I was walking through a grocery store in Manhattan, looking for something to eat on the train.  I found myself eye level with an energy bar whose label bragged about its protein content. All of this was normal — protein is the new low-fat (just as, once, “low-fat” was the new “high fiber”). But one thing was different: the energy bar was made with crickets.

I’d been following the world of insect-eating (entomophagy, to use the precise term) long enough to know that I was looking at a tiny shrink-wrapped miracle.  To get to this point, a lot happen behind the scenes in the American food system. Some people had to set themselves up as growers of insects that met the legal standards of food for humans, not just pet lizards. They had to get approval from the FDA, an agency that thought more about how much insect could accidentally make its way into your food than it did into developing food safety standards for people who wanted to put them there on purpose.

Eating insects isn’t exactly mainstream in America — it’s still out there on the dietary fringes. It owes its emergence to several different trends: the high-protein diets favored by bodybuilders and bodybuilder wannabees, the paleo diet (hard to get more paleo than insects), and the belief that American millennials are more likely to want “exotic” foods than their predecessors.

But why didn’t insect-eating become a part of this culture sooner? Not everyone who came across the insect-foraging cultures of North America had a terrible time, even in the 19th century. The botanist William Henry Brewer, who arrived at Mono Lake in Northern California in 1863, seems to have had a fine time eating the “fish.” Brewer came during the spring harvest, when tribes converged on the shores of the lake. The lake was filled with pupae who had grown chubby from eating the lake’s microscopic algae. The fat and protein that they had packed on would kickstart their metamorphosis into an adult fly, but until that metamorphosis happened, Mono Lake was an all-you-can eat insect buffet. “The Indians come far and near to gather them,” Brewer wrote.

The worms are dried in the sun, the shell rubbed off, when a yellowish kernel remains, like a small yellow grain of rice. This is oily, very nutritious, and not unpleasant to the taste … The Indians gave me some; it does not taste bad, and if one were ignorant of its origin, it would make fine soup.

Mark Twain, who also visited the lake, described it in Roughing It as a “lifeless, treeless, hideous desert.” But appearances were deceiving. Mono Lake was never going to be a landscape that could be farmed — it looked like a science fiction film set. But people who knew how to make use of the flies of springtime were like any culture that figures out how to survive in an inhospitable climate — they had found a species that could convert something inedible (in this case, algae) into a complete protein, and then they ate that species.  “There is no danger of starvation on the shores of Mono,” wrote John Ross Browne, a journalist for Harper’s Monthly, “The inhabitants may be snowed in, flooded out, or cut off by aboriginal hordes, but they can always rely upon the beach for fat meat.”

Pacheco

Europeans and their descendants have experimented with insect cuisine here and there (See: the lively maggot cheeses of Europe). But mostly they have focused on getting rid of insects, rather than turning them into dinner.

Why is it that Europeans never learned to eat bugs? I’ve heard the theory before that it’s because of livestock: Europeans spent so much time hanging out with chickens, goats, sheep, cows, and pigs that going after tiny invertebrates was beside the point. I’ve also heard the argument that agriculture is the culprit: By planting all the foods we like together in one convenient place, we created insect buffets, which then turned insects into the enemy that must be destroyed. But ranching, farming and insect-eating coexist in many cultures in Asia and Africa — so much so that some farmers will use their own fields as bait, capturing the insects that come to eat their crops and then eating them or selling them at the farmers market.

It’s more likely that the limiting factor is temperature. If you’re cold-blooded, like insects are, you’ve got to live in a warm place if you want to have any fun. Insects in cold areas stay small; insects at tropical latitudes grow big and juicy and hang out together in large groups that make them an appealing target. The Native Americans living on the East Coast were not big insect eaters, while the ones living in balmy California and Mexico were amazing at it. When Europeans arrived in a climate like California’s, they simply didn’t have the background to appreciate the invertebrate smorgasbord that was in front of them.

Today, the alkali fly is still a major presence at Mono Lake, but the only thing humans harvest from Mono is the water. In 1941, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power began diverting the freshwater streams that feed the lake so that instead of pouring into the lake, it traveled 350 miles south to Los Angeles. The fly population dropped by half, until environmental activists limited the amount of water that was being diverted to protect the only species that still eat the fly larvae — birds. Millions of birds come to the lake during fly season, some of them eating so many insects that they become too fat to fly. Meanwhile, the California drought has left Mono Lake at its lowest levels in decades. Humans still make the pilgrimage out to the lake, but just to watch the birds, not to join the feast.

So we’re still pretty far away from pop-up shops hawking artisanal Mono Lake pupae. In the U.S., entomophagy enthusiasts have chosen to focus on farming insects, instead of foraging for them. Which makes sense: farming is what we know.

But how easy is it to apply farming techniques to insects? More about that in part 2.


Filed under: Article, Food, Science
Categories: Environment

ARIES Energy & Environment Conference Comes to Pittsburgh, Sept....

PR Web - Wed, 07/29/2015 - 08:55

The ARIES Environmental Considerations in Energy Production Conference offers facts and cross-industry expertise, September 20-23, 2015, in Pittsburgh, PA

(PRWeb July 29, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12861032.htm

Categories: Environment

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