Environment

Recycling Workshop Offered for Florida Small Businesses by SWIX

PR Web - Wed, 03/25/2015 - 08:02

Learn from the experts about starting, improving or financing business recycling.

(PRWeb March 25, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12601786.htm

Categories: Environment

Iowa Entrepreneurs Announce Formation of Efficient Technologies

PR Web - Wed, 03/25/2015 - 08:02

Partnership-based business model provides innovative energy efficient solutions for Iowa businesses

(PRWeb March 25, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12602667.htm

Categories: Environment

The Schmidt Family Foundation Renews Support of the Cradle to Cradle...

PR Web - Wed, 03/25/2015 - 08:02

Institute announces further support from The Schmidt Family Foundation to encourage manufacturers to make products in better ways.

(PRWeb March 25, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12604251.htm

Categories: Environment

Diagnostics, Treatments for Cancer, Heart Surgery Advanced at SPIE...

PR Web - Wed, 03/25/2015 - 08:02

The first-ever National Cancer Institute (NCI) Grand Challenge at SPIE Medical Imaging was highly successful in helping researchers move forward in developing more accurate methods for detecting lung...

(PRWeb March 24, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12607831.htm

Categories: Environment

Engineers explain importance of wastewater reuse in new book

PR Web - Wed, 03/25/2015 - 08:02

Madan Arora, Joe Reichenberger put wastewater terminology into easily digested text for layperson

(PRWeb March 24, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/MadanArora/JoeReichenberger/prweb12607867.htm

Categories: Environment

James R. Cooley’s new book chronicles soldier’s transformative journey...

PR Web - Wed, 03/25/2015 - 08:02

‘Parkers Crossroads’ follows Jack Ebbott’s life from upper-class teenager to hardened soldier

(PRWeb March 24, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/JamesRCooley/ParkersCrossroads/prweb12607897.htm

Categories: Environment

Life of Timothy J. Maude detailed in Stephen E. Bower’s new book

PR Web - Wed, 03/25/2015 - 08:02

‘I’m Tim Maude, and I’m a Soldier’ describes Maude’s rise to lieutenant general, tragic death

(PRWeb March 24, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/StephenEBower/ImTimMaudeandImaSoldier/prweb12607944.htm

Categories: Environment

NAR: February Existing-Home Sales Rose As Inventory Increased Slightly

PR Web - Wed, 03/25/2015 - 05:01

The Federal Savings Bank shares news of the latest existing home sales figures from The National Association of Realtors.

(PRWeb March 24, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12607996.htm

Categories: Environment

Lance Shabazz’s New Book Shares Story of Finding, Giving up Modern-day...

PR Web - Wed, 03/25/2015 - 05:01

Author shares memoirs of Nation of Islam’s glory days in ‘Blood Sweat & Tears’

(PRWeb March 24, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/LanceShabazz/BloodSweatandTears/prweb12607862.htm

Categories: Environment

Renewable Energy Company Selling 500MW’s of Solar Farms to Investors...

PR Web - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 23:01

Innovative Solar Systems, LLC is in the process of selling the company’s remaining 500 Megawatts of “Shovel Ready” Solar Farm projects in North Carolina so that investors will have the ability to...

(PRWeb March 24, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12607426.htm

Categories: Environment

SEIA Announces Support for Florida Solar Ballot Initiative

PR Web - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 23:01

Calling it vitally important to the development of clean energy resources in Florida, the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) has announced its “strong support” in endorsing the Floridians for...

(PRWeb March 24, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12606151.htm

Categories: Environment

Church of Scientology Los Angeles Helping the Community Prepare for...

PR Web - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 23:01

Church of Scientology Los Angeles hosted a World Civil Defense Day disaster preparedness program February 28.

(PRWeb March 24, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12606192.htm

Categories: Environment

Top Florida Brahman Breeder, Moreno Ranches, Announces Show Cattle...

PR Web - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 23:01

Moreno Ranches is a top Florida breeder of Brahman cattle. The ranch's "This is It" is an educational event on cattle breeding for Brahman juniors and others interested in the cattle...

(PRWeb March 24, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/BrahmanJuniors/prweb12564925.htm

Categories: Environment

Video Contest Announced To Raise Awareness For Fragrance-Free Schools...

PR Web - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 23:01

A video contest open to all Pennsylvania junior and senior high school students (grades 7-12) to raise awareness for Fragrance-Free schools was announced today by Women for a Healthy Environment. The...

(PRWeb March 24, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12606561.htm

Categories: Environment

So Roundup “probably” causes cancer. This means what, exactly?

Grist.org - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 20:42

If your circle of friends and acquaintances is anything like mine, you’ve already heard by now that the World Health Organization just classified glyphosate — the active ingredient in the herbicide Roundup — as a probable carcinogen.

The WHO cancer agency also added two other pesticides, malathion and diazinon, to this “probable” category. That has received less press coverage because they, unlike glyphosate, are not associated with genetically engineered crops, always a lightning rod. There was a big increase in the use of glyphosate when farmers switched over to GE glyphosate-resistant crops.

So what does this new classification mean? There’s a great, er, roundup of reactions from scientific experts in the field here. That comes from the Science Media Center, which does yeoman’s work in taking controversial headlines and placing them within the context of scientific knowledge. I highly recommend taking a look at that. Here are the takeaways:

  • There is a real chance that these pesticides could cause cancer, and we should be careful with them.
  • There’s controversy — several scientists disagreed with the designation.
  • Don’t forget that the list of things that probably cause cancer includes … just about everything.

That last point is worth dwelling on a bit. Here’s the WHO’s full list of “known” (group 1), “probable” (group 2A), and “possible” (group 2B) carcinogens. It’s a weird list. Sunshine, alcoholic beverages (the ethanol therein), wood dust, and outdoor pollution are “known” carcinogens. The “probable” group includes wood smoke, night shifts (they disrupt circadian rhythms), and hot mate (the South American drink).

I make these comparisons not to downplay the risk — just to put it in proper context. Just about everything in life has risks; the trick is to weigh those risks thoughtfully against benefits.

The nice thing about glyphosate is that, at this point, it’s nonproprietary: Monsanto’s patent has expired and farmers can get it cheaply. It can be useful for poor farmers who want their kids to go to school rather than hoe the fields. It helps farmers adopt conservation tillage techniques (where they don’t plow at all, or only minimally, to prevent erosion, and encourage soil ecology). But there’s also no doubt that farmers are using more glyphosate than ever before, in an arguably profligate manner.

It may be that we as a society decide that, if the carcinogenic risk of this herbicide is greater than its benefits, we should take steps to reduce it. We’d want to do this in a holistic way, looking carefully at farm practice to ensure that glyphosate isn’t replaced with something worse. And we shouldn’t let the fact that it’s associated with the GMO boogeyman cloud our thinking.

Another probable carcinogen, acrylamide, is formed by cooking at high temperatures: It shows up, for instance, in coffee beans, potato chips, and french fries. The FDA just approved a GMO potato that produces less than half the acrylamide. If we want to reduce glyphosate use, shouldn’t we also embrace this potato? And conversely, if we aren’t worried about glyphosate, is there really any need for the new potatoes?

Either way, let’s just be consistent.


Filed under: Article, Business & Technology, Food, Living, Science
Categories: Environment

How American journalists deal with climate deniers

Grist.org - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 20:39

Jay Rosen has an interesting post up about how campaign journalists can (or should) deal with climate change denialists in the 2016 presidential cycle. As Rosen notes, drawing on Ben Adler’s great post from last year, several Republican candidates go beyond dissembling and hedging to flatly denying the anthropogenic character of climate change. Why, here’s one now!

I'm running for President and I hope to earn your support! pic.twitter.com/0UTqaIoytP

— Ted Cruz (@tedcruz) March 23, 2015

Rosen details four ways campaign journalists could deal with climate denialism in their coverage:

  1. Normalize it: Treat denialist claims like any other campaign position.
  2. Savvy analysis: Is denialism a winning move or is it costing the candidate?
  3. Persistence: Call what it is — a rejection of the science — and keep calling it that.
  4. Confrontation: Try to raise the costs of denialism.

Sez Rosen:

What to do? All four paths have problems. In my view 2.) is the worst option, 1.) is not much better, 3.) is probably the best choice, but that doesn’t mean it will make a difference, and 4.) is the riskiest but might be a worth a try.

He expects that, in practice, journalists will mostly go with Nos. 1 and 2, and I expect he’s right. See, for example, this Washington Post piece, in which Cruz’s denialism is simply noted without comment.

For many years, climate activists charged the media with “false equivalence” on climate change, treating obscure denialist claims as though they are on equal footing with mainstream science. (“On Shape of Earth, Opinions Differ,” as Paul Krugman used to joke.) Though you still hear that charge thrown around, I think it’s no longer particularly true. Right-wing media is its own thing, of course, but mainstream news outlets generally don’t do the “some say, others say” thing on climate science any more. It’s common to see sentences like, “The majority of climate scientists agree that human-generated CO2 is driving climate change,” or some such.

The more accurate charge against mainstream media today is that they rarely do No. 3 and almost never No. 4. Climate denialism has been deemed factually inaccurate by the press corps, but it hasn’t been made uncomfortable or politically dangerous.

Two things to say about this.

First, my hunch is that it’s less about lax professional standards than psychology and sociology. No journalist anywhere chooses what stories to pursue based purely on their objective significance. Journos chase stories that they think will make a splash, or that hook into existing narratives, or that their friends, colleagues, and social contacts are talking about. Few people are temperamentally suited to the lone crusade, and those who are rarely gravitate to campaign journalism.

By and large, journalists, like most people, reflect the values embedded in their social milieu. And the fact is, in the Beltway, climate isn’t that important. Most journalists have absorbed the judgment that it’s somewhat gauche to be a denier (which is progress, I guess). But few wake up thinking about climate. Few hear friends and associates spontaneously raise the subject in conversation, or hear colleagues ask about it at press events, or see politicians benefit or suffer from any particular position on it. It’s an “issue” that belongs to one faction of the left base, and D.C. journos are acculturated not to take such things very seriously.

In a sane world, politicians would lose credibility after denying climate change. It wouldn’t be a “normal” position, but an extraordinary one, the province of kooks and eccentrics. But that doesn’t happen. Sen. James Inhofe (R-Okla.) can pull his absurd snowball stunt one day and complain about how the federal government assesses the social cost of carbon the next — and have his complaints treated respectfully! (Hint to reporters: If he thinks the social cost of carbon is zero, his real objection is probably not to the exact process the government used to determine its number.) At no point do D.C. journalists seem to think, much less say, “You know what, this guy is kind of a loon, maybe we should take what he says with a grain of salt.” Denialism carries no consequence in the sociopolitical ecosystem in which Inhofe operates.

To make it consequential, journalists would have to push — ask about climate again and again, grind against the going-along-getting-along gears, make a fuss. That would inevitably entail some awkward encounters and social ostracism, not because D.C. is a hive of deniers, but simply because there’s a social order and behaving that way disturbs it. A journalist who did too much of that would wind up on the outside, branded an activist. For a young journo barely making enough to live, desperate for sources and stories, eager to move up the ranks, what’s the payoff? Why take the risk? An adversarial question about Hillary Clinton’s emails could get her aggregated by Buzzfeed and retweeted by thousands. What’s an adversarial question on climate going to get her?

Second, it’s important to put this particular problem in context. Climate denialism is, especially in a global context, an embarrassing outlier. You see some of it in Australian and Canadian politics, but pretty much everywhere else, it’s relegated to the fringe.

But in the American context, it is not alone. One of America’s two political parties is filled with people who believe that Obamacare contains death panels, Obama wasn’t born in the U.S., voter fraud among minorities is rampant, the government is on the verge of confiscating guns, the U.N. is plotting world government via urban sustainability, ISIS is sending Ebola-ridden Mexicans across the border, Obama sicced the IRS on Tea Party groups, abstinence education works, Jesus hated gays, Obama nuked Charleston, and on and on.

These things are crazy, just as crazy as climate denialism, but they are widely believed on the right, not only at the grassroots level but right up to Congress. Hell, at this point, supply-side economics has about as much empirical support as climate denialism, but it is settled doctrine throughout the party.

The fact is, one of America’s two parties has drifted out of mainstream thought and into its own hermetically sealed fantasy world. Recall the words of Rush Limbaugh, which I have quoted before:

We really live, folks, in two worlds. There are two worlds. We live in two universes. One universe is a lie. One universe is an entire lie. Everything run, dominated, and controlled by the left here and around the world is a lie. The other universe is where we are, and that’s where reality reigns supreme and we deal with it. And seldom do these two universes ever overlap. …

The Four Corners of Deceit: Government, academia, science, and media. Those institutions are now corrupt and exist by virtue of deceit. That’s how they promulgate themselves; it is how they prosper.

To reject mainstream government, academia, science, and media is to reject mainstream thought entirely. This is what scholars Thomas Mann and Norm Ornstein meant when they characterized today’s GOP as “un-persuaded by conventional understanding of facts, evidence, and science.” If you reject the practices and institutions that have developed to vouchsafe knowledge, if you can just build parallel institutions modeled along ideological lines, then anything goes.

This makes things increasingly awkward for the view-from-nowhere political reporter. Most D.C. journalists are well-educated cosmopolitans who hang around all day with other well-educated cosmopolitans. The people to which GOP candidates must now appeal, especially in the early primary days, believe lots of crazy things that well-educated cosmopolitans would react to with horror if they encountered them in the normal social course of affairs (at least the ones who don’t work at explicitly right-wing shops like the Free Beacon).

Yet these journalists rub shoulders every day with politicians who want to abolish the IRS and go to war with Iran and pass a constitutional amendment deeming fetuses people — and who reject the scientific consensus on climate change. If you’re an opinion journalist at a left-leaning outlet, like Danny Vinik, you can simply say, forthrightly, that a) Ted Cruz’s positions squarely reflect the consensus of his party, and b) they are not serious positions. They fly in the face of all evidence. They are absurd.

But if you’re a view-from-nowhere journalist covering a campaign, you can’t call the politicians you cover absurd. You can’t take sides in the fight between reality and ideological fantasy. Climate denialism is one place where the strain is starting to show, but there are others, and there will only be more as the conservative movement in the U.S. becomes more concentrated, intense, and dissociated from mainstream institutions. The basic mental model that has governed U.S. journalism for decades — two mirror-image sides, each with their moderates and extremists, engaging in normal politics — is crumbling and it’s not clear what journalism will look like when the dust clears.


Filed under: Article, Climate & Energy, Politics
Categories: Environment

SmartphoneTradeIn.com Purchases 7.5 Million Cell Phones &...

PR Web - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 20:00

Smartphone Trade-In Company Credits Success to Ease of Use for Both Individuals and Businesses, Industry Leading Payments, 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.

(PRWeb March 24, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12604547.htm

Categories: Environment

World Agricultural Microbials Market to Grow at 15.3% CAGR Through...

PR Web - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 20:00

New research study “Agricultural Microbials Market by Type (bacteria, fungi, virus, and protozoa), Crop Type (Cereals & grains, oilseeds, & pulses, fruit & vegetable) & Region - Global...

(PRWeb March 24, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12604937.htm

Categories: Environment

SolveForce Presents Houston with Lowest Prices on Fiber Optic Internet...

PR Web - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 20:00

Great prices and best value are offered from SolveForce.com with their new real-time quoting tool. This tool will be introduced to Houston in April 2015 and provides instant quotes on Fiber Optic...

(PRWeb March 24, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/fiberoptic/internet/prweb12605990.htm

Categories: Environment

Watch this Florida official awkwardly avoid saying “climate change”

Grist.org - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 19:09

This story was originally published by the Guardian and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.

The latest victim of Florida Gov. Rick Scott’s unwritten ban on state officials using the words “climate change” is his own disaster preparedness lieutenant, who stumbled through verbal gymnastics to avoid using the scientific term in a newly surfaced video.

Bryan Koon, Florida’s emergency management chief, was testifying before the state’s Senate budget subcommittee on March 19, answering questions about the news that the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) will pull federal funding from states that refuse to directly address climate change.

In the video, uploaded by the advocacy group Forecast The Facts, Sen. Jeff Clemens (D) asks Koon whether he is aware of the updated FEMA guidelines, which would block 2016 funding in states whose governors refuse to implement so-called hazard-mitigation plans for global warming.

Koon affirmed that the state’s next plan would be required to include “language to that effect.”

Clemens came back, saying: “I used ‘climate change,’ but I’m suggesting, maybe as a state we use ‘atmospheric re-employment,’ That might be something the governor can get behind” — to laughter among committee members and the audience.

But Koon charged on, clarifying that, “Future versions of our mitigation plan will be required to have language discussing that issue.”

“What issue is that?” Clemens asked with a smile.

“The issue that you mentioned earlier, regarding … ” Koon said, before being drowned out by laughter at his obvious discomfort.

Scott and his staff have repeatedly denied that they have instituted a ban on allowing local officials to say “climate change,” “global warming,” or “sustainability” in public, but the governor has not shied away from publicly expressing skepticism about the science of climate change on the campaign trail.

Koon’s public gaffe comes after recent reports that a longtime state environmental protection employee was issued an official reprimand instructing him to take two days of leave and not return to work before a mental health evaluation ruled him fit for duty after he included the words “climate change” in meeting notes.

Florida is far from the only state that has refused to make action on climate change a priority. Tennessee, Louisiana, and North Carolina all have laws on the books that open the door for climate change denial to be taught in the classroom.

A recent study from Columbia University’s Center for Climate Change Law also found that 18 states have disaster mitigation plans that either include no provisions for responding to the effects of climate change, or reference it in a dismissive or inaccurate way.


Filed under: Article, Climate & Energy, Politics, Science
Categories: Environment

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