Feed aggregator

The High Blood Pressure Solution Review Reveals a New Guide by Ken...

PR Web - 7 hours 22 min ago

DailyGossip.org publishes a review about the High Blood Pressure Solution program, a brand new method and comprehensive guide by Ken Burge.

(PRWeb October 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/The-High-Blood-Pressure/Solution-Full-Review/prweb12292808.htm

Categories: Environment

TheHardwareCity.com Stocks the New Thermostatically Controlled Outlet...

PR Web - 7 hours 22 min ago

Just in time for winter, the online hardware store is bringing in new products to help with winter electric bills.

(PRWeb October 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/ThermoCube/TheHardwareCity/prweb12293360.htm

Categories: Environment

SNOA Sleepwear to Support Sustainable Fashion Production

PR Web - Fri, 10/31/2014 - 21:32

The San Francisco-based brand to produce locally and sources only all-natural and biodegradable fabrics.

(PRWeb October 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/11/prweb12293359.htm

Categories: Environment

Stanley Consultants Receives Blue Zones Worksite Designation

PR Web - Fri, 10/31/2014 - 21:32

Stanley Consultants has successfully achieved a Blue Zones Worksite designation. This accomplishment means that Stanley Consultants has demonstrated a commitment to the wellbeing of its employees by...

(PRWeb October 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/11/prweb12293468.htm

Categories: Environment

Canterbury Communications Opens in Downtown Dallas

PR Web - Fri, 10/31/2014 - 21:32

Canterbury Communications recently announced the opening of its downtown Dallas office.

(PRWeb October 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/11/prweb12292890.htm

Categories: Environment

These wearable air monitors fight pollution from the streets

Grist.org - Fri, 10/31/2014 - 21:21

Here’s a Kickstarter that got our attention this month: The AirBeam, a wearable air monitor designed by Brooklyn-based environmental justice nonprofit HabitatMaps. The device costs $200 to produce, fits in your palm (if you’re Sasquatch), and is designed to measure particulate pollution on city streets, as well as temperature and humidity. It’s also kinda adorable — which is good, considering that the group is counting on hundreds of people wearing them around NYC in the near future.

But don’t let those cute blue Mickey ears fool you — the AirBeam is a response to a very real problem: Air pollution costs the U.S. $78 billion a year, HabitatMaps claim on their Kickstarter page:

The negative impacts of air pollution rank it among the most serious and widespread human health hazards in the world. Breathing dirty air causes chronic illnesses such as asthma and bronchitis and contributes to terminal illnesses such as cancer and heart disease. Unfortunately, despite the very real impacts air pollution has on our every day lives, it often goes unnoticed because it is largely invisible. In addition, because government-run air quality monitoring networks are sparse, publicly available air quality measurements don’t translate into an accurate assessment of personal exposure. The answer? Low-cost, portable air quality instruments.

Most official air monitoring occurs well above street level, where the air tends to be cleaner. The AirBeam monitors — once fully deployed by a team of citizen scientists — will measure pollution where it counts: where you actually breathe it. From GigaOm:

Michael Heimbinder, executive director at HabitatMaps, said that the nonprofit had developed the cheapest, portable air quality monitoring sensor it could in hopes of gathering data that it can then use to make policy arguments in the city. It’s also helpful for individuals who may want to change their own habits.

That is, if you know that levels of air pollution are pretty bad at a certain time and place on your commute, you might be able to tinker with your habits to limit your own exposure. But the real solutions will come from the sum total of all the data — cities will be able to identify hot spots for pollution, and then (er, hopefully) be better equipped to address them.

If you pledge $200, you’ll get an AirBeam of your own come launch — and a healthy dose of civic engagement to boot.


Filed under: Business & Technology, Living
Categories: Environment

Scary maps show how bad California’s water shortage is

Grist.org - Fri, 10/31/2014 - 21:11

Just how bad is California’s water shortage? Really, really bad, according to these new maps, which represent groundwater withdrawals in California during the first three years of the state’s ongoing and epochal drought:

J.T. Reager / NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

The maps come from a new paper in Nature Climate Change by NASA water scientist James Famiglietti. “California’s Sacramento and San Joaquin river basins have lost roughly 15 cubic kilometers of total water per year since 2011,” he writes. That’s “more water than all 38 million Californians use for domestic and municipal supplies annually — over half of which is due to groundwater pumping in the Central Valley.”

Famiglietti uses satellite data to measure how much water people are sucking out of the globe’s aquifers, and summarized his research in his new paper.

More than 2 billion people rely on water pumped from aquifers as their primary water source, Famiglietti writes. Known as groundwater (as opposed to surface water, the stuff that settles in lakes and flows in streams and rivers), it’s also the source of at least half the irrigation water we rely on to grow our food. When drought hits, of course, farmers rely on groundwater even more, because less rain and snow means less water flowing above ground.

The lesson Famiglietti draws from satellite data is chilling: “Groundwater is being pumped at far greater rates than it can be naturally replenished, so that many of the largest aquifers on most continents are being mined, their precious contents never to be returned.”

The Central Valley boasts some of the globe’s fastest-depleting aquifers — but by no means the fastest overall. Indeed, it has a rival here in the United States. The below graphic represents depletion rates at some of the globe’s largest aquifers, nearly all of which Famiglietti notes, “underlie the world’s great agricultural regions and are primarily responsible for their high productivity.”

J.T. Reager / NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

The navy-blue line represents the Ogallala aquifer — a magnificent water resource now being sucked dry to grow corn in the U.S. high plains. Note that it has quietly dropped nearly as much as the Central Valley’s aquifers (yellow line) over the past decade. The plunging light-blue line represents the falling water table in Punjab, India’s breadbasket and the main site of that irrigation-intensive agricultural “miracle” known as the Green Revolution, which industrialized the region’s farm fields starting in the 1960s. The light-green line represents China’s key growing region, the north plain. Its relatively gentle fall may look comforting, but the water table there has been dropping steadily for years.

All of this is happening with very little forethought or regulation. Unlike underground oil, underground water draws very little research on how much is actually there. We know we’re siphoning it away faster than it can be replaced, but we have little idea of how long we can keep doing so, Famiglietti writes. He adds, though, that if current trends hold, “groundwater supplies in some major aquifers will be depleted in a matter of decades.” As for regulation, it’s minimal across the globe. In most places, he writes, there’s a “veritable groundwater ‘free for all': property owners who can afford to drill wells generally have unlimited access to groundwater.”

And the more we pump, the worse things get. As water tables drop, wells have to go deeper into the earth, increasing pumping costs. What’s left tends to be high in salts, which inhibit crop yields and can eventually cause soil to lose productivity altogether. Eventually, “inequity issues arise because only the relatively wealthy can bear the expense of digging deeper wells, paying greater energy costs to pump groundwater from increased depths and treating the lower-quality water that is often found deeper within aquifers,” Famiglietti writes — a situation already playing out in California’s Central Valley, where some low-income residents have seen their wells go dry. In a reporting trip to the southern part of the Central Valley this past summer, I saw salt-caked groves with wan, suffering almond trees — the result of irrigation with salty water pumped from deep in the aquifer.

All of this is taking place in a scenario of rapid climate change and steady population growth—so we can expect steeper droughts and more demand for water. Famiglietti’s piece ends with a set of recommendations for bringing the situation under control: Essentially, let’s carefully measure the globe’s groundwater and treat it like a precious resource, not a delicious milkshake to casually suck down to the dregs. In the meantime, Famiglietti warns, “further declines in groundwater availability may well trigger more civil uprising and international violent conflict in the already water-stressed regions of the world, and new conflict in others.”

This story was produced by Mother Jones as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.


Filed under: Climate & Energy, Food
Categories: Environment

Is this House Republican about to lose to a climate hawk?

Grist.org - Fri, 10/31/2014 - 20:41

I haven’t paid too much attention to the midterm elections this year, mostly because they are depressing. Republicans are going to win the House and probably the Senate, which means two more years of fake investigations, pointless stunts, media warfare, and legislative gridlock in D.C. Whee!

Nonetheless, there’s one race that’s caught my attention. I’ve always had a mild fascination with Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.) not because he’s extraordinary in any way, but just the opposite: In his go-along-to-get-along mediocrity, he serves as a kind of weather vane, showing which way the wind is blowing on the right. He has tried to stay safe in the conservative herd — and now it looks like it could come back to bite him in the ass.

It’s been years since Upton has faced a credible challenge in Michigan’s Sixth District. He was elected to the House back in 1987 as a middle-of-the-road Republican moderate and won comfortably on that image for years. As late as 2007, he was teaming up with a Democratic colleague to pass a bill meant to phase out energy-wasting incandescent lightbulbs. In 2009, when everyone was pretending to care about climate, he was saying, “Climate change is a serious problem that necessitates serious solutions.”

And then, as with so many national Republicans, 2010 rocked his world. The Tea Party exploded. Upton faced a primary challenge from the right, and though it didn’t come particularly close to succeeding, it terrified him. What’s more, in 2010, he made a bid to take over the House Energy and Commerce Committee, where he’d been patiently waiting his turn. Conservatives took the opportunity to blast him for his incandescent lightbulb bill, painting him as an unforgivably moderate squish with a fondness for nanny state intervention.

Upton had to scramble to the right to placate the baying hounds, and he’s been flailing in that direction ever since, co-sponsoring bills with Sen. James Inhofe (R-Okla.) to block EPA regulation of carbon, backing a bill that would have rolled back the lightbulb standards he helped establish, and leading his committee in denying climate change. He’s become one of Big Fossil’s primary champions in Congress.

Despite his rightward lurch in a purple district (and his smaller margin of victory in 2012), the national Democratic Party, somewhat mysteriously, hasn’t put much money into challenging him. But earlier this month, the Mayday PAC — a crowd-funded PAC founded by Laurence Lessig to elect candidates that will help reduce the influence of money in politics — put $1.5 million into the race; this week it announced it’s spending $650,000 more.

Political observers, including environmental groups, have generally regarded the campaign of Upton’s challenger, Western Michigan University professor Paul Clements, as quixotic. LCV hasn’t gotten involved. Tom Steyer hasn’t gotten involved. But with some money behind him enabling him to get his message out, Clements is surging. A new poll shows him within the margin of error:

Eclectablog

It’s a toss-up! Suddenly the media is paying attention.

For what it’s worth, Clements is a bona fide climate hawk. He has gotten the endorsement of Climate Hawks Vote, one of the few super PACs scoring candidates and organizing electoral support based purely on climate change. (Our own Ben Adler covered the group here.) Here’s an ad touting clean energy jobs:

(I love it when nerds run for office.)

Upton is panicking, so there is no doubt a tsunami of fossil-fuel money already swamping Michigan’s 6th. All Upton’s ads are now touting his independence (as belied by his slavishly conservative voting record the last four years). He’s scrambling to explain his flip-flop on climate change:

Climate is changing, it always changes. I’ve not said that we’ve not had climate change. And I’ve not said that it was man-made and then changed my mind to say that it’s not man-made. I’ve said that that’s not really for me to determine.

Uh, what?

Poor Upton. He was a mediocre moderate when they wanted him to be. He was a science-denying, government-shutting-down hyper-conservative when they wanted him to be. And now they want him to be moderate again? OK. He’ll try. But it might just be too late this time.


Filed under: Article, Climate & Energy, Politics
Categories: Environment

32 countries where global warming could make violence worse

Grist.org - Fri, 10/31/2014 - 20:14

Recently, the Pentagon released a disturbing report. Climate change, it warned, will exacerbate problems like terrorism and disease outbreaks, drain military resources, and create new enemies. The report said that the military’s basic operations — everything from training to its supply chains and infrastructure — are now threatened by rising temperatures and shifting weather patterns. It all points to one conclusion: Global warming is a national security issue.

Now a new analysis, released Wednesday, is naming 32 countries in which conflict and civil unrest could be worsened by the changing climate. The findings are part of the seventh annual “Climate Change and Environmental Risk Atlas” from Maplecroft — a firm that studies how vulnerable countries are to various risks. It concludes that climate change is already impacting “food production, poverty, migration and social stability — factors that significantly increase the risk of conflicts and instability in fragile and emerging states.”

Those pressures could also “lead to disenfranchisement and drive support for radical groups.”

Maplecroft

Maplecroft analyzed how exposed populations in these are countries are to climate impacts and assessed how well their governments will be able to adapt over the next 30 years. According to the report, the five countries most vulnerable to climate-related conflict and food insecurity are Bangladesh, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, Nigeria, and Chad.

The 10 countries that Maplecroft found were most vulnerable to food insecurity and climate change. Maplecroft

The report’s authors highlight Nigeria (tied for third the list), where “widespread drought and food insecurity helped create the socio-economic conditions that led to the emergence of Boko Haram and the violent insurgency in the North East of the country.”

Boko Haram is a militant Islamist group that the U.S. Justice Department says has been responsible for 600 attacks on government, churches, mosques, and schools. It has killed about 5,000 people since 2009 and displaced over 650,000. The group kidnapped more than 200 girls and young women in April. (The Nigerian government says it has reached a ceasefire with the militants that would include the release of the girls, but according to the BBC the talks are still ongoing.)

After visiting Nigeria earlier this year, my Mother Jones colleague Erika Eichelberger found that drought, population explosion, environmental degradation, and poverty are all aggravating the country’s armed conflicts. There are now more clashes between farmers and nomadic herders over ever-dwindling agricultural land, and economic hardships in the country are boosting Boko Haram’s recruitment efforts. Eichelberger quoted Oluwakemi Okenyodo, the executive director of CLEEN Foundation, a Nigerian security-focused nonprofit, as saying that when “young people are pushed to the wall,” there’s a greater chance that they will be sucked into the growing Boko Haram insurgency. Eichelberger reported that “there’s not enough hard evidence yet to implicate human-caused climate change in the bulk of the ecological disaster” in Nigeria — but that could change in the future as rising temperatures increasingly threaten agriculture in the region.

In a 2011 report, the United States Institute of Peace outlined a “basic causal mechanism” linking global warming to future conflict in Nigeria: Water and agricultural land shortages are followed by sickness, hunger, and joblessness. Governmental inaction on these issues in turn opens the door to conflict. “In the increasingly parched, violent northeast,” writes the report’s lead author Aaron Sayn, “members of groups like Boko Haram explain their acts by voicing disgust with government.”

Maplecroft’s rankings lend even more weight to the growing body of research tying climate change to the potential for more violence. Prior to the unrest that eventually exploded into revolution and armed conflict, Syria had experienced an unprecedented drought that led to the internal displacement of thousands of people who had lost their livelihoods.

Natural resources were also at the heart of the Darfur crisis. “It is no accident that the violence in Darfur erupted during the drought,” U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki Moon wrote in a 2007 Washington Post op-ed. “Amid the diverse social and political causes, the Darfur conflict began as an ecological crisis, arising at least in part from climate change.”

This story was produced as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.


Filed under: Climate & Energy
Categories: Environment

Super-Sod Filmed a New Video for DIY Planting of Elite Tall Fescue...

PR Web - Fri, 10/31/2014 - 18:32

Their new video link was posted to their website in October, to instruct homeowners on how to plant Elite Tall Fescue grass seed.

(PRWeb October 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/11/prweb12291650.htm

Categories: Environment

Fairfield University School of Engineering project reduces illness in...

PR Web - Fri, 10/31/2014 - 18:32

South Dakota State University students helping with endeavor. Chlorinators were implemented to provide safer drinking water treated to World Health Organization (WHO) standards.

(PRWeb October 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/11/prweb12292253.htm

Categories: Environment

NEWwoodworks Offers Reclaimed Wood Accessories for Custom Projects

PR Web - Fri, 10/31/2014 - 18:32

NEWwoodworks is now offering a line of wall switch plates, outlet covers, and heating/cooling air diffusers crafted of reclaimed wood to seamlessly blend with paneling, flooring, and timber accents in...

(PRWeb October 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/newwoodworks/custom_switch_plates_gril/prweb12293406.htm

Categories: Environment

Joseph R. Perella To Be Honored At New York Fundraiser Supporting The...

PR Web - Fri, 10/31/2014 - 18:32

The New York dinner represents a significant portion of ASF fundraising efforts with monies raised going to support the restoration and protection of wild Atlantic salmon in Canada and the United...

(PRWeb October 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/11/prweb12293470.htm

Categories: Environment

Dr. Nicholas Lutsey Honored with the SAE International Barry D. McNutt...

PR Web - Fri, 10/31/2014 - 18:32

Dr. Nicholas Lutsey, Program Director with the International Council on Clean Transportation, has won the SAE International Barry D. McNutt Award for Excellence in Automotive Policy Analysis. Dr....

(PRWeb October 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/11/prweb12293872.htm

Categories: Environment

New Collection of Nano-particle Natural Silver Products by Activz...

PR Web - Fri, 10/31/2014 - 18:32

Activz Whole-Food Nutrition makes the benefits of silver available in liquid supplements, gels, lozenges and cleansing wipes. For more information about the new collection of Nano-particle Natural...

(PRWeb October 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/11/prweb12291201.htm

Categories: Environment

Many Homeowners Missing Key Safety Risks with Home...

PR Web - Fri, 10/31/2014 - 18:32

Numerous news stories have circulated this year around the country about families narrowly escaping carbon monoxide poisoning in their homes. A Missouri-based heating and cooling company is taking a...

(PRWeb October 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/11/prweb12291454.htm

Categories: Environment

Big Heat 1500w Electric Space Heater Now Available at...

PR Web - Fri, 10/31/2014 - 18:32

As the weather turns cold, homeowners are looking for ways to efficiently heat their space. The Broan-Nutone portable space heater offers a smart solution.

(PRWeb October 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/BigHeat/TheHardwareCity/prweb12293349.htm

Categories: Environment

"Family Self Defence" Review Reveals a New Unique Way to...

PR Web - Fri, 10/31/2014 - 18:32

DailyGossip.org reviews the Family Self Defence program, a new method that promises to help users discover some unique ways to increase safety.

(PRWeb October 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/Family-Self-Defence/Full-Review/prweb12293432.htm

Categories: Environment

"The Drama Method" Review Reveals a New Unique Relationship...

PR Web - Fri, 10/31/2014 - 18:32

DailyGossip.org publishes a review to the Drama Method, a new program that promises to reveal unique relationship advice.

(PRWeb October 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/The-Drama-Method/Complete-Review/prweb12293459.htm

Categories: Environment

"Memory Healer" Review Reveals a New Natural Remedy Guide...

PR Web - Fri, 10/31/2014 - 18:32

DailyGossip.org reviews the Memory Healer program, a unique system which has proven exceptional outcomes in reversing the adverse effects of memory loss.

(PRWeb October 31, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/Memory-Healer/Full-Review/prweb12293492.htm

Categories: Environment

Pages