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Utah Government Official Heralds Park City’s Echo Spur Development as...

PR Web - 9 hours 10 min ago

The first two of seven luxury homes will be completed in August in Park City, Utah’s historic district

(PRWeb July 07, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12833174.htm

Categories: Environment

SyncNest is Now Live in the App Store and Google Play to Drive Real...

PR Web - 9 hours 10 min ago

Real time SyncUps with friends just got really easy.

(PRWeb July 07, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/syncnest/07/prweb12830376.htm

Categories: Environment

Anupam Sen Gupta Cites Life as Best Teacher in New Story Collection

PR Web - 9 hours 10 min ago

‘The Colours of Sound’ chronicles author’s real-life experiences and life-defining moments.

(PRWeb July 07, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/AnupamSenGupta/TheColoursofSound/prweb12833200.htm

Categories: Environment

Smartphone Mapping App Helps Humanitarian Organizations Clear...

PR Web - 12 hours 10 min ago

Spatial Networks, a St Petersburg, FL based technology firm, has discovered a new application for Fulcrum, its mobile mapping platform - helping humanitarian organizations like HALO Trust identify...

(PRWeb July 07, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12820202.htm

Categories: Environment

Adventure Travel Booming with Baby Boomers reports Costa Rica Tour...

PR Web - 12 hours 10 min ago

Baby boomers now control 80% of all financial assets and account for 80% of all leisure travel. Their generation is largely contributing to the rise of luxury adventure travel. Costa Rica Tour Company...

(PRWeb July 07, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12819022.htm

Categories: Environment

New V-Concept by MIS Implants, Delivers True Innovation to Implant...

PR Web - 12 hours 10 min ago

“MIS Implants is now a frontrunner of innovation in implant dentistry.” This was the potent message delivered by MIS at a powerful product launch introducing the new V3 Implant System, part of the...

(PRWeb July 07, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12827671.htm

Categories: Environment

KOAMTAC Announces the Launch of KoamTacON, an Innovative Web-Based...

PR Web - 12 hours 10 min ago

KOAMTAC®, Inc. announces the launch of KoamTacON®, a convenient and low cost application tool that designs data collection applications - without the need for advanced programming and coding...

(PRWeb July 07, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/KoamTacOn/ApplicationDevelopment/prweb12829001.htm

Categories: Environment

Renewable Choice Staff Honored by USGBC Volunteer Service Award

PR Web - 12 hours 10 min ago

Leadership in green building is recognized at Convergence 2015

(PRWeb July 07, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12831887.htm

Categories: Environment

Equal Earth Brand Ambassadors Dominate the 70.3 Distance with Inspired...

PR Web - 12 hours 10 min ago

Impressive Performances by World-Class Triathletes Spieldenner, Nicholls and Reid

(PRWeb July 07, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12832782.htm

Categories: Environment

Caltech Honors Innovators with Significant CO2 Reduction Technologies

PR Web - 12 hours 10 min ago

The Range of Strategies Target Three Different Sources of CO2 Emissions for Saving the Environment

(PRWeb July 07, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12830365.htm

Categories: Environment

Ike Knife's New Book Shares Poems in ‘Catch a Sunset’

PR Web - 12 hours 10 min ago

Poetry book recounts experiences of one person across two decades of young to middle-aged adulthood.

(PRWeb July 06, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/IkeKnife/CatchaSunset/prweb12832993.htm

Categories: Environment

Mental Health Month Concludes with New Book from Katherine M. Chin

PR Web - 12 hours 10 min ago

‘How to Manage Mental Illness’ guides readers through navigating mental health system and overcoming stigma.

(PRWeb July 06, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/KatherineMChin/HowtoManageMentalIllness/prweb12833019.htm

Categories: Environment

Mortgage Rates Rise As The Holiday Approaches

PR Web - 15 hours 11 min ago

The Federal Savings Bank shares news of the latest move in mortgage rates and the housing environment, as told by both Freddie Mac and the National Association of Realtors.

(PRWeb July 06, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12833006.htm

Categories: Environment

New book by Forrest R. Fichthorn takes fresh look at Bible

PR Web - 15 hours 11 min ago

‘Six Plus One Equals Seven’ features reasons why number seven is relevant in Bible

(PRWeb July 06, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/ForrestRFichthorn/SixPlusOneEqualsSeven/prweb12830724.htm

Categories: Environment

Climate change leaves trees out to dry

Grist.org - Mon, 07/06/2015 - 23:21

The drought may be killing lawns, but whatever — they’re useless. When drought starts going after trees, however, that’s another matter. As year four of California’s drought rolls around, the magical, shade-providing carbon sinks are starting to perish, thanks to a lack of rain and a more recent lack of lawn irrigation.

It turns out all that profligate sprinkling was feeding California’s trees — and when cities cracked down on turf, they inadvertently starved out the more useful urban greenery. And while this one’s partly on us — maybe we should have realized that all those trees need to drink, too — we can give climate change (which is ultimately on us as well) a lot of the credit for this fun development. Climate change, you’ve done it again! Everyone else: Welcome back to Spoiler Alerts.

Here’s the story from Al Jazeera:

Nature has already killed an estimated 12 million trees in California’s forests since the drought began four years ago — most falling victim to an outbreak of the bark beetle pests that attack trees weakened by drought.

Now, trees in city parks, along boulevards and in residential neighborhoods are dying because homeowners, businesses and municipalities have stopped watering.

“The reaction was to turn off irrigation in many locations,” said John Melvin, urban forester at the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. “If you do that, you lose a long-lived community asset. A tree is not something that can be easily replaced.”

Trees are a big part of what makes a city green — literally, but also figuratively, thanks to the energy they save on AC:

A recent report by the U.S Department of Agriculture Forest Service show that the number of street trees in California have not kept up with population growth. The 9.1 million street trees make up 10 percent to 20 percent of the state’s total urban forest. The report also found that tree density has declined 30 percent since 1988 “as cities added more streets than trees.” Tree density fell from 105.5 trees per mile to 75 trees per mile in that period.

Despite that, the agency estimates that California street trees save the amount of electricity equivalent to what’s required to air condition 530,000 households every year.

The conclusion? Radically simple, says Melvin:

“It’s OK to appropriately water trees.”


Filed under: Climate & Energy, Science
Categories: Environment

“True Detective” wants to remind us that sometimes L.A. is just the worst

Grist.org - Mon, 07/06/2015 - 22:40

In this installment of Green Screen, we highlight the greenest parts of your favorite TV guilty pleasures (spoiler: There are a lot of them!).

Last week, we asked the question: Can True Detective make us love Los Angeles for all its smoggy flaws, as it has done for its previous despicable protagonists? Last week, we felt optimistic — perhaps it was because the sun was shining, a long weekend was on the horizon, and we were giddy at the prospect and promise of a renewed relationship with a well.

This week, we feel differently.

Let’s recall from last week’s episode: Ani is driving around the barren streets of L.A., sucking on her miserable e-cig, ruefully contemplating the unstoppable flow of newcomers to La La Land. Why have they come to this godforsaken place? Ani wonders. These poor, disenfranchised people — what do they do? Where do they live?

The answer is pretty clear: Wherever they can. Tent cities under the freeway are a dismal but apparently inescapable product of poorly managed urban expansion (as has been shown right here in our hometown of Seattle). When Ani, in pursuit of a suspect in a Dollar Tree kabuki mask, runs head on into an encampment that serves as home to some of Los Angeles’ many displaced, she literally leaves it to burn after her quarry sets it on fire, as if to say “Fuck it — there’s crime on the run!!”

It’s an apt metaphor for what this episode did to any promising developments in the one prior. The third episode of this blighted season centers around the parts of L.A. — and American culture in general — that are far, far uglier than mere freeways and industrial pollution: cheap clubs selling imported prostitutes alongside whiskey doubles, over-the-top productions of post-apocalypse blockbusters, and hideous Bel Air mansions with condom-filled pools (they may not seem to give a shit about the drought, but at least they’re using protection!).

So — can True Detective help us find anything to appreciate about its most interesting character and one of America’s most-hated cities? Last week, the answer was: Maybe! This week: No, it truly is loathsome. Check back with us next week to see if things get any better!


Filed under: Cities, Living
Categories: Environment

Perkins Eastman Partners with Habitat for Humanity of Greater...

PR Web - Mon, 07/06/2015 - 22:29

In-house design competition to support neighborhood revitalization efforts in Greater Pittsburgh area

(PRWeb July 06, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12819564.htm

Categories: Environment

Why crushing bees into soup could actually help them

Grist.org - Mon, 07/06/2015 - 22:26

“Bee soup” sounds like the makings of the most fantastical children’s book ever, right? Turns out the secret to understanding — and maybe even reversing — bees’ mysterious decline worldwide may be swirling in a bowl of it. According to new research out of the U.K., crushing up wild bees and collecting and reading their DNA could enable scientists to carry out large-scale monitoring programs that will tell us whether conservation efforts to save the tiny pollinators are really working.

Lead researcher Douglas Yu — a professor from the University of East Anglia’s School of Biology — spoke with EurekaAlert! about his work:

“Insect soup is a sensitive thermometer for the state of nature. And large-scale bee monitoring programmes would really benefit from this type of DNA sequencing. The method can easily be scaled up to track more species, like the 1000 or so total pollinating insects in the UK.

“We can find out where species diversity or abundance is highest – for example in the countryside or in city parks- and how species diversity is affected by farming methods – for example, to see if habitat set-asides support more bees.

“Species biodiversity at any given site can be revealed in a single drop of soup. It’s a technique that shaves weeks, months, years off traditional ecological methods, saves money and spares the need for tons of taxonomic expertise.

“We’re trying to speed up ecological investigation on a monumental scale.”

Imagine the scientific potential in a single drop of insect soup! YAS QUEEN.

 

 


Filed under: Science
Categories: Environment

Which is harder, Tetris or climate change?

Grist.org - Mon, 07/06/2015 - 21:17

If there’s anyone who knows how to solve big problems, it’s Henk Rogers, discoverer of Tetris. Fortunately, the man who ended boredom is now turning his attention toward climate change.

Rogers had a near-death experience back in 2006 that left him determined to save the planet: “We’re going to end the use of carbon-based fuel, and that is my mission No. 1,” he told the Associated Press. The god of blocks has since made his 6,000 square foot home in Honolulu completely energy independent and now plans to help others join him off the grid.

Here’s more from the AP:

Rogers will announce his new company, Blue Planet Energy Systems, on Monday. The new venture, which will sell and install battery systems for homes and businesses running on solar technology, plans to begin sales on Aug. 1. He declined to say how much the systems would cost, but said there will be a five- to seven-year return on the investment for a typical project that his company will install.

The Blue Ion system, which Rogers has been testing in his home for the last year, uses Sony lithium iron phosphate batteries, which can last for 20 years and do not require cooling, he says.

Elon Musk, who is already trying to solve the problem of home energy storage, should probably save face by encroaching on Roger’s own area of expertise and challenging the man to a Tetris duel.

Until then, here’s an idea: Why don’t we reframe the fight against climate change as one giant game of Tetris? Think of all the brain power that would suddenly zero in on ending this planetary death spiral!

As one game theorist puts it in the following YouTube homage to Tetris, “This game makes ordinary people like you and me become emotionally invested in tessellated stacks of squares. That’s ridiculous!”


Filed under: Business & Technology, Climate & Energy
Categories: Environment

The EPA could ban this toxic pesticide

Grist.org - Mon, 07/06/2015 - 20:51

The Environmental Protection Agency plans to ban one of the most toxic pesticides allowed in the U.S. unless the companies that sell it restrict its use.

Environmental groups have been pushing the EPA to ban chlorpyrifos since 2007. And on June 30, in response to an order from the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, the EPA filed a report saying it would ban the chemical unless makers “agree to take necessary action, i.e., amending the product labeling of chlorpyrifos products, to address unsafe drinking water exposures.” (Tougher labeling would carry legal weight.)

Use of chlorpyrifos has declined over the last few decades — largely due to the increased use of insect-resistant GM corn. But farmers still spray between 5 and 10 million pounds of the stuff every year. It’s used on a wide variety of crops and on golf courses. Eaters are exposed to trace levels — almost certainly too small to have any effect — but farmworkers and those living nearby may be exposed to worrying amounts.

Chlorpyrifos.

Chlorpyrifos is an organophosphate — one of the more toxic pesticide classes still in use. Unlike some pesticides that target specific pests, chlorpyrifos interferes with the functioning of an enzyme that is essential for most animals, including humans.

It can be absorbed through the skin, so farmworkers are not supposed to go into fields for 24 hours after it’s been sprayed. Long-term effects are harder to ascertain, as they tend to be. Several studies found an association between elevated organophosphate levels in the womb and neurological deficits later on in life. These studies of chronic effects are always hard to interpret — was it exposure to this particular chemical in utero that caused a small shift in IQ seven years later, or something completely different? Researchers do their best to consider, and control for, all the various confounding factors. But it’s clear that chlorpyrifos does have short-term hazards: It’s toxic to birds, bees, fish, and earthworms. And it can linger in water. The EPA also said that farmworkers may need more protections from the pesticide.

By April 15, 2016, the EPA will publish its new rules, limiting or prohibiting the use of chlorpyrifos.


Filed under: Article, Business & Technology, Food, Politics
Categories: Environment

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