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New Report Shows America’s Schools Saving Money by Going Solar

PR Web - Thu, 09/18/2014 - 05:25

In a report card deserving of the honor roll, a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind new study released today by The Solar Foundation says America’s K-12 schools have shown explosive growth in their use...

(PRWeb September 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12178571.htm

Categories: Environment

Fecbek.com: Ladies Can Be Elegant Enough to Draw Everyone’s Attention...

PR Web - Thu, 09/18/2014 - 05:25

Today, Fecbek, a well-known special occasion gown manufacturer and retailer, has delightedly unveiled its new series of ball gowns. All the gorgeous ball gowns are offered at discounted rates.

(PRWeb September 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12180601.htm

Categories: Environment

Elegant Petite Evening Dresses Introduced By Renowned Supplier...

PR Web - Thu, 09/18/2014 - 05:25

iFitDress.com, a renowned wedding dress manufacturer and retailer, has recently announced its new assortment of petite evening dresses. All these outfits are now offered with big savings (up to 65...

(PRWeb September 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12180627.htm

Categories: Environment

UCS Supports Fossil Fuel Divestment

Union of Concerned Scientists - Thu, 09/18/2014 - 05:00
In advance of the UN Climate Summit in New York City next week, UCS announces its support for divestment from fossil fuels.
Categories: Environment

Al Gore is still trying to save us, one graph at a time

Grist.org - Thu, 09/18/2014 - 00:41

Al Gore still loves his graphs. He’s lost weight since going vegan and his hair has turned gray, which suits him. But watching him host the 24 Hours of Reality event this week was like stepping into a time machine.

The Climate Reality Project, which Gore founded and chairs, put on the live marathon webcast from Tuesday noon to Wednesday noon EST. Everything about Gore’s presentation was the same as it ever was: the earnestly wonkish caveats, the pedantically drawn-out speech patterns, the educator’s mien. And those graphs, always those graphs.

Gore had a graph for everything and a laser pointer in his hand to draw lines on them. In a typical riff, he pointed to a graph showing that California’s commitment to energy efficiency has caused its energy use to flatline even while energy use has risen in the U.S. as a whole. California, he reflexively noted, “has had the same GDP growth as the rest of the United States,” lest anyone suggest efficiency comes at an economic cost. This is someone who clearly has a lot of experience talking to economics-obsessed Americans, and who can anticipate the right-wing objection to anything.

This was the webcast’s fourth year. Last year, according to the Climate Reality Project, it drew 20 million viewers worldwide over the course of the 24 hours. This year’s numbers are not yet available, but as of 6 p.m. Tuesday they were at 4 million, suggesting a similar trajectory, as there’s usually a spike toward the end. The numbers are impressive — especially given that, despite high production values, the aura was undeniably one of an infomercial, with Gore’s cohosts reading stiffly from teleprompters and conducting humorless interviews with assorted experts on the set.

This year’s theme was “24 Reasons for Hope.” The reasons are the ones you would expect: the price of solar power is dropping, China is investing in clean energy, lending institutions are shifting away from investments in fossil fuels. “It’s important for people to understand we can succeed, because [climate change] can seem overwhelming,” says Ken Berlin, the Climate Reality Project’s CEO. While these bright spots are by no means illegitimate, organizing them into this theme implicitly admits that the climate movement fights a constant battle against hopelessness.

Gore, as the movement’s unofficial leader, must struggle with those feelings of being overwhelmed by the massiveness of the problem and the political impediments to solving it. But he would never say so in public. A career in politics, where you never admit that you might lose a campaign, has prepared him well for being in perpetual rallying-the-troops mode.

The webcast was broadcast from a stage in the Brooklyn Navy Yard in front of a huge window. Facing north, it captured a sliver of the Manhattan skyline, the Williamsburg Bridge, and a few new apartment towers on the Brooklyn waterfront. The vista was quite real, and in person it was striking, but on one’s computer screen it somehow looked fake, so it had the oddly diminishing effect of a failed attempt at glamour.

The Climate Reality Project promised “a variety of international celebrities, musicians, advocates, and other special guests” at the event, and highlighted these names: Vanessa Black, Colbie Caillat, Rodne Galicha, Wanjira Mathai, Jason Mraz, Patrick Ngowi, Bunker Roy, Mark Ruffalo, Ian Somerhalder, Johan van der Berg, Daniela Velasco. It’s OK if you don’t know who most of those people are. No one does.

It must be humbling to someone who not only was vice president, but who won the popular vote for the presidency. Bill Clinton has the Clinton Global Initiative, with its assembled heads of state, CEOs of the world’s largest corporations, philanthropists making massive pledges, and Earth-bestriding movie stars bringing out the paparazzi. Gore has this webcast.

For the first six hours, the cohost who assisted in introducing segments was Ashlan Gorse Cousteau, a striking former anchor of E! News Now. She would introduce Gore, who would lecture on the topic of the hour’s video segments. The insights Gore shared — “We need to stop subsidizing coal and support wind and solar,” leakage of methane wipes out the advantage of natural gas over coal, energy efficiency saves money as well as emissions, President Obama has gotten serious about climate change in his second term — would not come as revelations to regular readers of Grist. And still, Gore chooses to stay up for 24 hours, on his feet and on camera for most of it, reiterating these points that must be even more unremarkable to him.

Gore is as cautious and measured off-camera as he is on-camera. “I have mixed feelings” about natural gas, he tells me. “I think we need much tighter regulations of all the environmental problems caused by fracking in particular. A very short-term substitution of gas for coal, as a short-term transition, with the methane leakage fixed, and with tough regulations of the environmental damages, that’s another matter. We don’t have that right now.” He praises Obama for “providing important leadership for solving the climate crisis,” while criticizing the administration’s ongoing “below-market leasing of coal and oil and gas reserves.”

On Sunday, Gore will join the People’s Climate March. Its organizers, in an effort to emphasize the economic and social-justice components of the climate movement, are not giving a special position to any of the VIPs, not even the former vice president.

Listening to Gore speak, it is remarkable not that Americans didn’t choose him over the simple-minded cheerleader he ran against, but that they actually sort of did. This is not an insult; it’s a compliment. Gore will stand on his feet for 24 hours, he will talk at length with a former host of E! News, he will repeat ad nauseum the merits and drawbacks of natural gas, all to show humanity how to save itself. If only it were clear that humanity even wants to be saved.


Filed under: Climate & Energy, Politics
Categories: Environment

Seaweed: Healthy, delicious, and legal in all 50 states

Grist.org - Wed, 09/17/2014 - 23:43

Seaweed, on the rare occasions I came across it in my Midwestern upbringing, seemed like a pretty simple deal: beach-borne mass of green goo-ribbons that you don’t really want to step on. Other than a few seaside experiences, I didn’t really think about seaweed much at all. And I da-hefinitely didn’t think about eating it.

But I’ve changed my ways. I learned my lesson. I’m a seaweed believer. Here’s why:

I read an article in the most recent edition of Lucky Peach, a quarterly food journal, by writer Rachel Khong. In it, she chronicles a summer she spent on the California coast, north of San Francisco, harvesting and preparing edible seaweed with Mendocino Sea Vegetable Company.

According to Khong’s research, seaweed is one of the most life-giving plants in the world. Here’s a taste of what she writes in her article:

The seashore is where all our stories start. It’s understood that present-day humans evolved in littoral spaces, where the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish and shellfish, originally from seaweed, were needed to evolve complex nervous systems and big brains. Which is to say: eating seaweed — either directly or by proxy — was what made us us. And seaweeds sustain life on earth, producing 70 to 80 percent of the world’s oxygen through photosynthesis…

Plus, she notes, “seaweed is an impressively ample source of protein.”

The protein-rich superfood feeds almost everything under the sea. Really, all ocean creatures eat seaweed somehow — whether directly or by eating something else that eats seaweed — so it’s the foundation of the marine food chain.

Why I haven’t eaten seaweed before (other than as sushi-wrap) is beyond me. Especially considering that humans have been munching on seaweed for thousands of years. Writes Khong:

We can’t be sure how long human beings have been eating seaweed — whatever archaeological proof of seaweed that might’ve existed has long since broken down and disappeared — but by most educated guesses it is a very, very long time. The oldest proof we have is the seaweed found in mortars in southern Chile dating to 12,000 BCE.

So while seaweed-eating may kinda seem like just another foodie trend, it has deep roots in human history and is supposedly very yummy. So why not go out and forage your own, world? It’s abundant, nutritionally dense, and pairs well with Dijon mustard and fresh tarragon.


Filed under: Article, Food, Living
Categories: Environment

California (finally) gives cyclists a little more room to ride

Grist.org - Wed, 09/17/2014 - 23:38

Thanks, California! You are now the 24th state to require that drivers pass a cyclist with at least three feet of clearance. Local officials even have a snazzy name for the mandated breathing room: the buffer zone.

Until now, California’s only buffer rule advised cars to pass “at a safe distance” — and “safe,” as everyone knows, is relative. The penalty for ignoring the buffer zone is only $35. But hey, small victories. The fine jumps to $220 if a cyclist is injured in the zone.

More from the Los Angeles Times:

Colin Bogart, the programs director for the Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition, a cycling advocacy organization … said he hopes that the law will encourage drivers to take a deep breath and wait before speeding past a cyclist.

“Every cyclist can cite a really harrowing moment where someone came way too close and really spooked us in the process,” Bogart said.

Truth. As a longtime California cyclist, I gotta say, the whole buffer thing had me spooked. If I cruised a few feet away from parked cars, to avoid getting doored, I’d be at the mercy of the crazy traffic behind me. If I swerved away from the crazy traffic, I’d put myself back in the line of door-flinging fire. According to the Los Angeles Times, in 2012, 5,000 cyclists were injured or killed in Los Angeles County alone.

But no worries, bike haters, the legal language around this stuff will still be nice and vague:

Under the new law, if traffic is too heavy to change lanes — or if other conditions make a three-foot buffer impossible — drivers must slow to a “reasonable and prudent” speed and wait to pass until the cyclist is safe.

“Reasonable and prudent”?! In afterwork gridlock? Ha, that’s a good one.


Filed under: Article, Cities, Living
Categories: Environment

Spider9 Selected for Hawaii’s 2015 Energy Excelerator Program

PR Web - Wed, 09/17/2014 - 23:24

Spider9to be one of select few companies to help pioneer advanced energy storage solutions in Hawaii

(PRWeb September 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12179078.htm

Categories: Environment

A New Plugin Entitled ProBlue 5k Was Released Today from Pixel Film...

PR Web - Wed, 09/17/2014 - 23:24

Announcing a new ProBlue 5k plugin from Pixel Film Studios; This plugin includes over 100 Ultra High Definition anamorphic flares for Final Cut Pro X

(PRWeb September 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/final-cut-pro-x-plugin/2014-09/prweb12179247.htm

Categories: Environment

Weekly Mortgage Applications Fire Back Up

PR Web - Wed, 09/17/2014 - 23:24

Peoples Home Equity shares the results and comments on Wednesday's weekly mortgage applications released by The Mortgage Bankers Association.

(PRWeb September 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12180288.htm

Categories: Environment

What’s the deal with this U.N. Climate Summit?

Grist.org - Wed, 09/17/2014 - 21:04

The most important thing for you to know about the upcoming United Nations Climate Summit is what it isn’t.

The meeting, to be held at the U.N.’s New York headquarters this Tuesday, Sept. 23, will be the first time heads of state have gathered to discuss global warming since the 2009 U.N. Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen. So casual observers might think this is the opening round of negotiations on an emission-reduction agreement that will hopefully be completed at the U.N. Climate Change Conference in Paris in December 2015. But it isn’t.

This Climate Summit should be viewed as distinct from the treaty negotiations that are intended to wrap up late next year. “It’s not designed to be a pre-negotiation for Paris,” cautions Nigel Purvis, who directed U.S. environmental diplomacy in the Bill Clinton and George W. Bush administrations and now runs the Climate Advisers consultancy.

“The least helpful analogy is the Copenhagen conference,” says Peter Ogden, director of international energy and climate policy at the Center for American Progress, who previously served as President Obama’s National Security Council point person on climate change. “Do not expect there to be any breakthrough on core sticking points on international climate talks. It’s more about opportunity for leaders, not just political leaders, but business, faith, and so forth, to demonstrate solidarity for taking strong climate action.”

The relationship to Paris, then, is that the summit will give leaders a chance to demonstrate political will, which is a precondition to reaching an agreement. And in case leaders are going wobbly, climate activists are planning to march in New York on Sunday to show them climate action is good politics. So the summit, like the march, may help build momentum for the Paris talks.

For the media, the main show will be the speeches by world leaders. Some 125 heads of state or government will be delivering remarks, including President Obama, along with high-level representatives from around 40 other countries. There are so many that each will (supposedly) be strictly held to a four-minute time limit.

But the list is as notable for who won’t be there as who will be. Chinese Premier Xi Jinping and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi are both skipping it, officially for scheduling reasons. That would seem to be a bad sign, since they represent the world’s two most populous countries and two of the fastest-growing economies, and China is now the world’s largest greenhouse gas emitter.

Experts caution that this does not mean China and India are unenthusiastic about climate action. China just recently announced that it is moving forward with plans to launch a nationwide cap-and-trade system in 2016. “China is trying to deal with domestic issues of air quality and energy security and building a sustainable economy,” says Nathaniel Keohane, who leads the Environmental Defense Fund’s international climate program. “I think China is moving very fast and that will be reflected in its stance toward negotiations over the next year and a half.” As for India, Modi plans to make a big push for solar energy. He initiated the nation’s largest solar program when he was head of the state of Gujarat.

More worrisome are the heads of state who are not attending because they truly oppose taking action to protect the climate: Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott. (All of these countries are sending envoys.) Harper and Abbott are both from their nation’s conservative parties, and they’ve both pushed policies to rapaciously exploit their fossil fuel resources. They also recently announced their intention to coordinate efforts to undermine international action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Russian President Vladimir Putin also won’t be showing up. Russia’s economy is heavily dependent on extraction of oil and gas, and Putin has displayed little interest in climate change beyond trying to claim the oil under the melting ice cap on the North Pole for Russia.

Still, there will be plenty of star power on display. And though the leaders won’t be making any decisions, they will be highlighting ideas and pushing agendas. Here are five themes that are likely to course through the summit and associated events:

  • Action is needed to protect the most vulnerable. The list of speakers is full of leaders from poorer countries that will experience the worst impacts of climate change and are least able to handle them. Many — from small Pacific island nations like Tuvalu and Vanuatu to populous countries like Bangladesh — face threats of frequent flooding from rising sea levels. Expect the developing countries to emphasize the need for funding for renewable energy and sustainable economic development, and also funding for infrastructure improvements to deal with the warming and subsequent effects that we’ve already guaranteed with our emissions thus far.
  • Nations and cities are acting on their own. Obama could announce additions to his Climate Action Plan. Some other rich nations — the World Wildlife Fund says two, although it won’t say which two — will announce commitments to the Green Climate Fund, which helps developing countries cope with climate change. Other countries will make announcements around cutting their emissions or reducing deforestation. The C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group will hold an awards ceremony in New York on Monday night recognizing specific achievements by various member cities.
  • Climate action is an economic opportunity rather than a burden. A high-profile report released a week ahead of the summit argues that ambitious climate action could be undertaken at essentially no cost to the global economy. Expect to hear lots more talk about how green cities are prosperous cities and how there is money to be made or saved in renewables and energy efficiency.
  • Many in the private sector want clear and strong climate policies. For example, on Thursday international investor groups are expected to announce a series of initiatives that support an ambitious global climate deal. Participants include the Ceres Investor Network on Climate Risk in the U.S., the European Institutional Investors Group on Climate Change, the Investor Group on Climate Change in Australia and New Zealand, and the Asia Investor Group on Climate Change. They will also unveil tools to share information on low-carbon investments and praise examples of businesses that have been leaders.
  • Public-private partnerships can lead to progress. Public and private-sector leaders gathered with U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in Abu Dhabi in May to introduce a number of public-private initiatives, like one in which the (currently few) participating oil and gas companies will identify and apply best practices to reduce methane leakage in the drilling process. More such initiatives will be announced Tuesday.

A cynic might dismiss this as a lot of feel-good talk and little action. And she would have a point. But, in the case of an issue as depressing as climate change, it might feel good to feel good for once.


Filed under: Business & Technology, Climate & Energy, Politics
Categories: Environment

Fans of all ages From Across the USA to Attend 2014 Rocket...

PR Web - Wed, 09/17/2014 - 20:24

Fans of author Homer Hickam [October Sky (movie) and Rocket Boys (book)] have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to launch rockets, enjoy a 1950’s concert with Bill Haley’s Comets, and meet Hickam, the...

(PRWeb September 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12174937.htm

Categories: Environment

EcoBeauty Brand Lotus Moon Unveils New Gluten-Free Sugar Cane Fruit...

PR Web - Wed, 09/17/2014 - 20:24

Lotus Moon’s Sugar Cane Fruit Mask is an effective, active and anti-aging treatment mask for instant radiance. A fruit acid mask that behaves like a peel but applies like mask. Lotus Moon’s newest...

(PRWeb September 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/natural-organic-skincare/mask-anti-aging/prweb12177683.htm

Categories: Environment

Shimadzu’s New Nexera-e Two Dimensional Comprehensive Liquid...

PR Web - Wed, 09/17/2014 - 20:24

The new system is beneficial to scientists analyzing pharmaceutical impurities, proteins, lipids, peptides, food extracts, and natural products.

(PRWeb September 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12177885.htm

Categories: Environment

ASF Calling For Immediate Government Action Due To Crisis State of...

PR Web - Wed, 09/17/2014 - 20:24

This year, the Miramichi, a popular, world famous salmon fishing river for American and Canadian anglers, is experiencing a salmon decline that is among the worst in recorded history.

(PRWeb September 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12177952.htm

Categories: Environment

GE LED Bulb—the First ENERGY STAR(R)-qualified to Achieve 100 Lumens...

PR Web - Wed, 09/17/2014 - 20:24

GE Lighting’s 100-watt A-line replacement LED bulb has earned recognition from two influential lighting industry organizations.

(PRWeb September 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12178290.htm

Categories: Environment

SEIA, Vote Solar Celebrate Solar’s Continued Price Declines

PR Web - Wed, 09/17/2014 - 20:24

The average cost of going solar in the United States continued its rapid decline in 2013 and the first half of 2014, according to a new study from the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National...

(PRWeb September 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12178525.htm

Categories: Environment

Saltwater Sounds Under the Deep Blue Sea at the South Carolina...

PR Web - Wed, 09/17/2014 - 20:24

The Charleston Symphony Orchestra Performs at the South Carolina Aquarium

(PRWeb September 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12178564.htm

Categories: Environment

Global Flue Gas Desulfurizer (FGD) Market - Greenfield & Retrofit...

PR Web - Wed, 09/17/2014 - 20:24

Global Flue Gas Desulfurizer (FGD) Market 2014-2018 profiles key players like Alstom S.A., General Electric Co., Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Siemens AG and The Babcock & Wilcox Company...

(PRWeb September 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/global-flue-gas-/desulfurizer-market-2018/prweb12177311.htm

Categories: Environment

Get Affordable Optical RDO Technology with the New Oakton Waterproof...

PR Web - Wed, 09/17/2014 - 20:24

Advanced technology reduces maintenance and costs

(PRWeb September 17, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/09/prweb12178653.htm

Categories: Environment

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