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Nonferrous Metal Foundry Products Manufacturing in Canada Industry...

PR Web - Fri, 01/23/2015 - 18:26

While imports of low-value, high-volume castings will continue to pose a threat, domestic foundries will work closely with customers to develop specialized castings, which will provide a buffer from...

(PRWeb January 23, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/01/prweb12464765.htm

Categories: Environment

Ophthalmologist Performs Surgery to Help Save Young Cheetah's Eye...

PR Web - Fri, 01/23/2015 - 18:26

An eye doctor from Windhoek, Namibia, donates his services to operate on Khayjay, a young male cheetah living in Cheetah Conservation Fund's sanctuary.

(PRWeb January 23, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/01/prweb12467315.htm

Categories: Environment

Evluma Announces DLC Qualification of Improved Outdoor Area Light

PR Web - Fri, 01/23/2015 - 18:26

Quality standards organization lists improved AreaMax™ with integrated photocontrol option and sleeker, lighter, anti-corrosion housing.

(PRWeb January 23, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/01/prweb12467362.htm

Categories: Environment

Self-destruction genes could keep GMOs from spilling into the wild

Grist.org - Fri, 01/23/2015 - 18:04

It’s the worst nightmare of activists opposed to genetically modified crops: An errant GMO seed blows out of a wheat or corn field and breeds with a species in the wild or on a neighboring farm. The modified gene proliferates and spreads through the population, and pretty soon the line between engineered crops and their “natural” counterparts begins to disappear, with unpredictable consequences for ecosystems.

This happened in 2010 in North Dakota, when scientists discovered that genes from genetically engineered canola — grown commercially for its oil across the state — were appearing in nearly every sample of canola taken in the wild. In that case, the “escape” of GMO canola turned out to be no big deal.

But it raised eyebrows with plant scientists about how quickly modified genes can spread. Some warned that plants engineered to be especially hardy — for example, the drought- and heat-tolerant plants that agribusiness giants like Monsanto are pushing as a remedy to climate change — could drive out native breeds, taking with them a precious store of genetic diversity.

Since the late 1970s, when genetically engineered crops began to arrive on U.S. farms, federal, and state agencies have applied a smattering of rules and regulations to prevent this from happening. But on Wednesday, a pair of new studies published in Nature offered, for the first time, a protection that comes straight from an organism’s DNA.

After several years of painstaking research, bioengineers at Yale and Harvard have developed a method to ensure organisms with engineered DNA could survive only in designated environments, and not in the wild. Their research was on the bacteria E. coli, but the scientists said the same basic steps could be applied to genetically modified crops, as well as to bacteria used to process dairy products and probiotics for health applications, and even the microorganisms sometimes used to clean up oil spills.

“Endowing safeguards now is important to allow the field [of biotechnology] to go forward,” said geneticist Farren Isaacs, a co-author of the Yale study.

To understand how the proposed solution works, let’s back up to a few basics of genetics. Everything about an organism — its color, how it reproduces or digests food, basically any trait you can think of — is encoded in its DNA, a long sequence of base molecules represented by the letters A, T, C, and G. Stretches of this code are called genes; the entire thing is a genome.

The bases make up a blueprint that tells a cell how to arrange amino acids taken from the environment into functional proteins that are the building blocks of life. Every three bases along the chain code for a specific amino acid, of which there are 20. One of the coolest things about biology is that those same 20 amino acids, dictated by the same code, are used by every living thing from bacteria to apple trees to humans.

What Isaacs and his colleagues managed to do was to re-code an E. coli genome so that it could make use of a special 21st amino acid that was synthetically produced in a lab. Then they went a step further, by planting the code for that acid inside genes that are essential to the bacteria’s basic life functions. When the bacteria is moved to a Petri dish without the synthetic amino acid, it dies. The method could give biotech researchers an unprecedented level of control over their genetic modifications.

“We do consider this a new class of organism,” said George Church, a Harvard geneticist who co-authored one of the papers. “This will be a barrier unlike any that has existed in the kingdoms of life.”

The implication is that when an organism’s genes are modified for a specific function — to increase corn yield, for example — those same genes could also be outfitted with this custom re-coding to make them dependent a steady supply of a synthetic amino acid that can’t be procured in the wild. In the case of crops, that could be supplied through custom fertilizer — a concept that is similar to how existing GMO crops are engineered to work in tandem with certain herbicides. If one of these seeds found its way into the wild, it wouldn’t survive without the synthetic amino acid. Of course, that could open up an entirely new avenue for Monsanto and its peers to monopolize the equipment farmers need to eke out a competitive edge.

Crops with this built-in protection are still years away, Isaacs said: Plant genomes are larger and more complex than E. coli, and it takes longer to grow lab samples of plants than of bacteria. And each new gene to be modified means more time and money.

But this kind of protection is increasingly important in the context of global warming. While GMO crops could be an important tool for some farmers to cope with increased drought or other climate change impacts, they pose a definite threat to genetic diversity. And the need to protect genetic diversity has never been greater, according to a separate study this week from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.

As changing climate conditions shift — and in many cases shrink — where crops are able to grow, 16 to 22 percent of wild relatives of crops will go extinct by 2050, the FAO study found. When those varieties disappear, they take with them a treasure trove of genetic adaptations that could be cross-bred with commercial varieties to help plants survive climate change. That study recommends expanding seed banks and traditional breeding programs to preserve diversity. Christopher Emsden, an FAO spokesperson, said genetically modified crops don’t need to be a part of that equation, adding that the debate over GMOs is a “hot potato” he didn’t want to comment on.

“The main thing to note here is that this hundred-page report makes not a single mention of GMOs,” Emsden wrote in an email.

This story was produced as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.


Filed under: Business & Technology, Climate & Energy, Food, Living
Categories: Environment

Obama’s trade agenda is a disaster for the environment, greens warn

Grist.org - Fri, 01/23/2015 - 17:59

In a State of the Union address that hit most of the right notes on the environment and other progressive issues, Obama pushed one policy that has green groups up in arms: fast-tracking of trade deals. In a letter sent this week to every member of Congress, environmental advocates warned that two particularly far-reaching deals that are in the works could “significantly weaken public health and environmental protections.” The letter was signed by nearly 50 groups.

They warned that the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) — a deal with Asian and Pacific nations, not including China — and the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) — a deal with Europe — contain “rules that would grant foreign corporations the right to sue governments, in private tribunals, over environmental, public health, and other laws and policies that corporations allege reduce the value of their investment.” These agreements also contain “rules that would require the United States Department of Energy to automatically approve exports of liquefied natural gas to countries in the pacts with no analysis to determine whether exporting natural gas is in the public interest.”

That all sounds pretty bad. Obama, though, presented things in a different light in the State of the Union. He claimed that his trade policy will “level the playing field” for American workers as Asian economies grow. “I’m asking both parties to give me trade promotion authority to protect American workers with strong new trade deals from Asia to Europe that aren’t just free but are also fair,” he said. Labor groups disagree with about “leveling the playing field”; they say the deals might generate more income for American companies, but would do little to protect American workers’ jobs.

Negotiations on both deals have been going on for years, more or less in secret. Advocates and even members of Congress still don’t know exactly what’s in them. As details leak out, partisans are finding themselves with odd bedfellows. In a twist on the usual, mainline Republicans are on board with this Obama initiative. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has pledged to push for the fast-track authority the president wants, which would prevent Congress from amending any trade deal he presents — legislators would simply vote “yes” or “no.” Opposing Obama and McConnell are many Democrats, environmentalists, unions, civil libertarians, and a handful Tea Party Republicans who don’t want to give Obama any more power.

But, as Carter Dougherty reports at Bloomberg, the administration is successfully rallying the business lobby to get behind the deals — the same lobby that, 20 years ago, supplied the push needed to make NAFTA a thing. Caterpillar, of bulldozer fame, got its employees to write 17,500 letters to members of Congress supporting fast track. IBM has executives from all 50 states inviting members of Congress to tour plants that produce products that could be sold abroad.

For awhile, former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) was standing in the way of fast-track authority going anywhere. But Republicans control the Senate now, and enough of them seem inclined to follow the lead of McConnell and the business lobby. “I’ve got a lot of members who believe that international trade agreements are a winner for America,” McConnell said after the midterms. “And the president and I discussed that right before I came over here, and I think he’s interested in moving forward. I said, ‘Send us trade agreements. We’re anxious to take a look at them.'”

Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah) plans to introduce some legislation to give the president expanded trade powers next week. So, unless environmental groups and their motley assortment of allies can raise a loud enough alarm, the TPP might get pushed through this year.


Filed under: Business & Technology, Climate & Energy, Politics
Categories: Environment

SAE International Continues IVHM Book Series with Title on Insights...

PR Web - Fri, 01/23/2015 - 15:26

SAE International’s fourth book in its integrated vehicle health management series, “Integrated Vehicle Health Management: Implementation and Lessons Learned,” is available.

(PRWeb January 23, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/01/prweb12461332.htm

Categories: Environment

SpaceBillboard, the First Billboard in Space Ready for Launch

PR Web - Fri, 01/23/2015 - 15:26

European start up SpaceBillboard brings the art of branding to space reality

(PRWeb January 23, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/SpaceBillboard/01/prweb12463865.htm

Categories: Environment

Global Petroleum Coke Market to US$24,117.9 Million by 2020:...

PR Web - Fri, 01/23/2015 - 15:26

Transparency Market Research published a new report titled "Petroleum Coke Market- Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2014 - 2020" to its report store.

(PRWeb January 23, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/01/prweb12464081.htm

Categories: Environment

Transparency Market Research: Global Powder Metallurgy Market is...

PR Web - Fri, 01/23/2015 - 15:26

Transparency Market Research releases a new market research report, "Powder Metallurgy Market- Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast 2014 - 2020," to add to its...

(PRWeb January 23, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/01/prweb12464186.htm

Categories: Environment

Larson Electronics Reveals New Design for their LED Drop Light

PR Web - Fri, 01/23/2015 - 15:26

Industrial lighting specialist Larson Electronics has revealed a new design for their three foot 14 watt LED drop light. These drop lights are suitable for civilian and military shelters, general...

(PRWeb January 23, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/larsonelectronics/leddroplight/prweb12465619.htm

Categories: Environment

BellasDress.com Shows Its Latest Designs Of Ball Gowns To Global...

PR Web - Fri, 01/23/2015 - 15:26

BellasDress.com today releases its latest designs of ball gowns which have attracted many customers’ eyes.

(PRWeb January 23, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/01/prweb12466469.htm

Categories: Environment

Greenberg Traurig’s Michael G. Cooke Moderating Panel at 42nd Annual...

PR Web - Fri, 01/23/2015 - 15:26

Michael G. Cooke, an attorney in the Tampa Environmental Practice of international law firm Greenberg Traurig, P.A. will participate in the 42nd annual Public Utility Research Center (PURC)...

(PRWeb January 23, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/01/prweb12466475.htm

Categories: Environment

Inmar Releases Key Coupon Trends for 2014

PR Web - Fri, 01/23/2015 - 15:26

Marketers employing multiple methods, higher face values to help drive redemption

(PRWeb January 23, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/coupon-trends-webinar/prweb12466628.htm

Categories: Environment

FilterEasy Raises $1.2 Million Seed Round

PR Web - Fri, 01/23/2015 - 15:26

Subscription service redefines homeowner’s relationship with their air filters

(PRWeb January 23, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/01/prweb12466074.htm

Categories: Environment

RedVector Welcomed as an Official Education Partner by the U.S. Green...

PR Web - Fri, 01/23/2015 - 15:26

RedVector partners with USGBC to provide world-class online education in the areas of green building, LEED and sustainable design

(PRWeb January 23, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/01/prweb12467398.htm

Categories: Environment

Phoenix Solar Inc. Welcomes New CEO & President Tim P. Ryan

PR Web - Fri, 01/23/2015 - 12:26

Tim P. Ryan, experienced solar industry executive, assumes new role Feb. 1st , 2015. Appointment of Group CEO to lead US efforts underscores importance of US market.

(PRWeb January 23, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/PhoenixSolarUSnewCEO/01/prweb12465654.htm

Categories: Environment

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital Recognized for Reducing its...

PR Web - Fri, 01/23/2015 - 12:26

NewYork-Presbyterian is one of a select few hospitals in the country to be honored by The American Society for Healthcare Engineering (ASHE) for reducing its energy consumption

(PRWeb January 23, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/01/prweb12465197.htm

Categories: Environment

Drought and water shortages require innovation and cooperation reports...

PR Web - Fri, 01/23/2015 - 12:26

Bio Logic Aqua Research founder and fresh water advocate Sharon Kleyne reacts to recent news on fresh water conservation, impoundment, recycling and rain making.

(PRWeb January 23, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/01/prweb12466929.htm

Categories: Environment

Today a new plugin was announced from Pixel Film Studios, FCPX3D:...

PR Web - Fri, 01/23/2015 - 09:26

Announcing a new plugin from Pixel Film Studios, FCPX3D: Shatter, a 3D shatter transition pack for Final Cut Pro X

(PRWeb January 23, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/final-cut-pro-x-plugins/01/prweb12462096.htm

Categories: Environment

Britton Industries Opens Newest Recycling Center in Morrisville, PA

PR Web - Fri, 01/23/2015 - 09:26

Britton Industries, one of the largest recyclers in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, has opened its new recycling center in Morrisville, PA to serve contractors, homeowners and commercial businesses.

(PRWeb January 23, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/releases/recycling-center/prweb12462497.htm

Categories: Environment

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