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Now Get Great Gun Safety Devices for Ammunition with Innovative...

PR Web - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 14:15

Gun owners, concerned about unwanted access to their guns, rifles, etc. can now relax as GunSafes.com ensures impermeable safety for ammunition by offering innovative biometric gun safes.

(PRWeb June 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/gunsafescom/biometric-hand-gunsafes/prweb11930004.htm

Categories: Environment

CIRKIL® Rag in a Bag™ Protocol, for Treating Bed Bugs in...

PR Web - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 14:15

AgBiotech company, Terramera today announced their Rag in a Bag™ protocol, to treat bed bugs in electronics and other clutter, was featured in Wired Magazine. The article reported on work done by Dr....

(PRWeb June 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11930023.htm

Categories: Environment

Fish are great at fighting climate change. Too bad we’re eating them all.

Grist.org - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 13:32

Climate change may be screwing with your seafood, but it turns out your seafood has been fighting back.

Fish, like Aquaman, might not seem to have a lot of relevance in the world-saving department. Never mind that the world is 99 percent ocean by habitable volume: We’re up here in the 1 percent of living space we care about the most, and they’re stuck breathing through gills and riding around on sea-ponies.

But in a DC Comics-worthy plot twist, a new study shows that fish have been doing a lot more world-saving than we thought, by way of sequestering carbon to stave off climate change — which on the danger scale is up there with supervillain plots like blocking out the sun or moving the moon. The catch (har) is that we can’t eat all our fish and have them save the world, too.

The sea absorbs about half of the billions of tons of CO2 humans emit; if it didn’t, it would already be absorbing quite a few of us. But it’s not like the oceans are just a giant sponge passively sopping up our atmospheric mess. They’re more like a forest — a really, really big one in which plants and animals grow and photosynthesize and eat each other and die, intaking carbon as they go. And a forest is made up of trees, or in this increasingly literal metaphor, phytoplankton and fish and other organisms. You can’t cut down all the fishtrees and expect your oceanforest to keep sucking up carbon.

Though we used to think that phytoplankton near the surface of the ocean did all the work of sequestration on their own, by taking their carbon with them when they died, it it now clear that the process is a little more vigorous than that. Instead of just waiting for carbon-laden plankton to get on their level, certain deep-dwelling, nightmare-inducing predators actually hunt down the tasty upper-level nibbles before swimming back into the extreme depths where all that carbon is effectively trapped for good.

And scientists recently learned that there are 10 to 30 times more of these mid- to deep-sea fish than they thought (and I made sushi jokes about them). Since these elusive fish turn out to make up 95 percent of the biomass in the ocean, they have a lot to do with why the ocean is so good at vacuuming up all our carbon. It goes (roughly) like this: Phytoplankton near the surface gobble up CO2 and are in turn gobbled by mid-level fish who swim up for their nightly buffet. These fish, once they head back to more familiar depths, are then gobbled by even deeper sea fish. It’s the circle of extremely creepy-looking life.

As with any cycle, there is a danger that even small changes can disrupt the whole system. In this case, overfishing scoops up lots of important mid- and deep-sea fish, either as bycatch or in the form of tasty endangered species like orange roughy or Chilean sea bass. A 2008 report on deep-sea fisheries from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea found that the pressure of overfishing on these ecosystems was especially severe:

A large proportion of deep-water trawl catches (upwards of 50 percent) can consist of unpalatable species and numerous small species, including juveniles of the target species, which are usually discarded … The survival of these discards is unknown, but believed to be virtually zero due to fragility of these species and the effects of pressure changes during retrieval … Therefore such fisheries tend to deplete the whole fish community biomass.

So eating lots and lots of fish is good for the climate, but only if you’re a fangtooth cruising the mesopelagic for takeout. The rest of us now have one more reason to check Seafood Watch before digging into that sustainably caught, bycatch-free, preferably local and abundant filet-o’-fish.


Filed under: Climate & Energy, Food
Categories: Environment

QA Graphics Bridge Data Manager Chosen as Money-Saving Product by...

PR Web - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 11:15

QA Graphics is proud to announce that BUILDINGS magazine has selected the Bridge Data Manager as a 2014 Money-Saving Product winner. The Bridge Data Manager product is part of an elite group of 97...

(PRWeb June 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11921440.htm

Categories: Environment

Ethylene Glycols Market By Product (MEG, DEG, TEG), By Application...

PR Web - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 11:15

Market Size - $23.81 bn in 2013, Market Growth - CAGR of 5%, Market Trends – Increasing application in textiles and PET manufacturing. View full report -...

(PRWeb June 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/Ethylene-Glycols-Market/GrandViewResearchInc/prweb11926372.htm

Categories: Environment

Diyouth.com’s Pet Leash Sets Now Come With Big Discounts

PR Web - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 11:15

Recently, Diyouth.com has announced its new range of pet leash sets. Also, all these fashionable items now come with big discounts.

(PRWeb June 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11926436.htm

Categories: Environment

Sharon Kleyne Hour Host Develops Fresh Water Technologies to Solve...

PR Web - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 11:15

Bio Logic Aqua Research Founder and Radio Host Sharon Kleyne’s Personal Campaign to Avert Global Fresh Water Disaster

(PRWeb June 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11929831.htm

Categories: Environment

Krud Kutter Original Chosen as Money-Saving Product by BUILDINGS...

PR Web - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 11:15

Krud Kutter® cleans up on multi-surfaces to make BUILDINGS magazine’s Money-Saving Product list. Krud Kutter, an eco-friendly line of cleaning solutions, including the award winning Original Krud...

(PRWeb June 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/KrudKutterBuildingsAward/June14/prweb11929861.htm

Categories: Environment

Agribusiness Veteran John Campbell Joins Ocean Park Advisors

PR Web - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 11:15

A pioneer in biofuels, Campbell to lead corporate finance efforts in Midwest in his new role as managing director.

(PRWeb June 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/OPA/campbell/prweb11930063.htm

Categories: Environment

Swimming Pool Owners Cut Chemical Costs in Half, Eliminate Skimming,...

PR Web - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 11:15

Pools become virtually maintenance-free. JustloveSuccess offers the Harmonizer below cost for a limited time.

(PRWeb June 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11930373.htm

Categories: Environment

Potassium Chloride Market is Expected to Reach USD 32.87 Billion in...

PR Web - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 11:15

Transparency Market Research published a new report "Potassium Chloride Market: Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast 2013 - 2019" to its report store. Browse...

(PRWeb June 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11930422.htm

Categories: Environment

TerraGo Partners with Beijing Space View Technology to Support Growth...

PR Web - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 11:15

Partnership expands reach of TerraGo solutions to one of the world’s fastest growing markets for geospatial technology.

(PRWeb June 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11916343.htm

Categories: Environment

Robert Julian Hafner offers new study of female influences in art...

PR Web - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 11:15

Female influences are discussed, analyzed in ‘Mistress, Model, Muse and Mentor: Women in the Lives of Famous Artists’

(PRWeb June 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/RobertJulianHafner/06/prweb11930264.htm

Categories: Environment

Move over, Avatar: Suzy Amis-Cameron (James’ wife) fights environmental disaster with vegan school lunches

Grist.org - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 11:08

In the debate over healthy school lunches, it turns out that all you need to do to change the system is be a former movie star — or be married to the guy who directed the two biggest flicks of all time. Or both: former actress and model Suzy Amis-Cameron – James Cameron’s wife – is putting her ducks in line to see that the Carlsbad, Calif.-based school she founded will soon become the first to go completely vegan.

Such a bold move shouldn’t be surprising coming from a school that was established out of a loathing for M&M’s. Amis-Cameron decided to start MUSE School CA in 2005, when she picked up her 4-year-old daughter from school and discovered that the girl had spent the day learning math with colorful, saccharine pellets.

“The school she was going to – that touted itself as an environmental school – was teaching my child to count with M&M’s,” Amis-Cameron tells NPR. “And everything in my life came to a screeching halt.”

The next year, while her husband toiled away on a grand vision of blue cat people who teach us humans the errors of our environmental ways, MUSE was up and running. Today 140 students, only two of whom are Camerons, attend the school. And sustainability is part of its core: The school is powered by “solar flowers” (thanks to a donation from James), up to 20 percent of its cafeteria’s food is already home-grown through its seed-to-table program, and they’ve done away with the need for pesticides by hiring a falconer whose hawks dine on the pests, instead. But maybe that last one’s really more about the need to provide the kids with some sort of fun to compensate for the lack of candy.

Suzy and James — environmentalist vegans themselves (though James didn’t make that decision until after Avatar) — see plant-based diets as the biggest thing someone can do to reduce his or her footprint. “You can’t really call yourself an environmentalist if you’re still consuming animals,” Amis-Cameron says. “You just can’t.”

In that case, the Camerons can rest assured knowing that there will soon be vegan M&M’s in the world.


Filed under: Article, Food, Living
Categories: Environment

Red states pump out more carbon pollution than blue ones

Grist.org - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 10:35

On June 2, the Obama administration unveiled its proposal for the nation’s first-ever regulations on carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants. It’s a bold and potentially groundbreaking move that has environmentalists, public health advocates, and power plant operators mobilizing their supporters or mounting their defenses.

Each year, electric power plants emit about 2.2 billion tons of carbon dioxide — roughly 40 percent of the nation’s total emissions. If successful, the administration’s proposed plan would reduce this sector’s emissions to 30 percent below 2005 levels by 2030. While this goal falls a bit short of environmental advocates’ hopes, it would significantly dent one of the largest sources of carbon emissions from the world’s second-largest producer of greenhouse gases. Many hope that the United States’ action on this issue will also catalyze the international cooperation needed to address climate change on a global scale.

Critics are certain to challenge the administration’s approach in Congress and in court, and have already argued that any climate regulation is an overextension of the Environmental Protection Agency’s authority. Of course, the EPA is uniquely positioned to regulate climate pollution. The migratory nature of air pollution and climate change shakes up the borders between state and federal jurisdiction. For instance, a recent Supreme Court case debated — and upheld — the EPA’s ability to require states to limit soot and smog-forming air pollutants that drift into other states. Climate change presents a similar dilemma: Carbon dioxide emissions from a coal plant in Pennsylvania endanger the Florida coastline, regardless of the political and geographic boundaries between them.

But which states are most likely to contest the proposed regulations — and why? Despite the flexibility in the regulations’ targets and tactics, some states may face steeper practical and political challenges than others. A recent review of statewide carbon emissions from the Yale Center for Environmental Law and Policy (YCELP) found that carbon pollution follows party lines. YCELP’s maps illustrate the “size” of red and blue states according to their carbon emissions. Cumulatively and on a state-by-state basis, red states tend to produce more carbon pollution than blue ones, as you can see in this map.

This distinction holds true in terms of both carbon production and carbon consumption.  In other words, Republican states produce more carbon as a byproduct of their economies, and their citizens consume more carbon through the transportation, residential, and commercial activities that shape their lifestyles. Carbon production measures how much states rely on carbon-intensive activities, like energy and electricity production and fuel use, to drive their economies. Production data helps uncover the economic and political motivations behind states’ stances on climate change, but does not account for the ways carbon is exported and imported across state lines. For instance, Idaho and Massachusetts — two of the 10 states with the lowest per capita carbon dioxide production emissions — consistently import electricity. Carbon production totals often overlook these kinds of carbon use.

Information on states’ carbon consumption can help close this data gap; per capita consumption focuses on the ways carbon is incorporated into people’s lifestyles. YCELP considers carbon consumption on a per capita basis — in terms of metric tons of carbon pollution produced or consumed per person — which highlights the ways that state size, population density, and climate also shape states’ rankings. For instance, Wyoming’s cold winters — combined with its status as the lower 48’s most sparsely populated state, and second-most prolific energy producer — create a perfect storm for high per capita carbon consumption. That being said, a tough climate does not necessarily lead to high emissions. Vermont and Maine also face extreme temperatures with sparse populations, but maintain some of the nation’s lowest per capita consumption levels, as you can see in this map.

Carbon consumption may also reveal an area’s ability to get more mileage from its energy use. New York’s very low carbon consumption reflects the large percentage of its population that lives in New York City. Public transit, relatively small living spaces, and other efficiencies of city living lower its residents’ carbon footprints.

While many factors influence carbon use, carbon-intensive economies remain a central predictor of state emissions. As the U.S. Energy Information Administration notes, “The activity of producing energy is itself energy intensive.” Wyoming, North Dakota, Louisiana, West Virginia, and Alaska — five states with energy production at the heart of their economies — also lead the nation in terms of per capita carbon consumption. Energy sources also play into states’ carbon footprints. Sixty-five percent of South Dakota’s net electricity generation comes from wind and hydroelectric power, while neighboring North Dakota relies on more carbon-intensive fuel. In 2013, 79 percent of its net electricity generation came from coal.

The economic strength of states’ ties to carbon may help dictate who will fight the new regulations the hardest — and be most reluctant to curb their footprints if their challenge fails. While some drivers of carbon use — such as Wyoming’s howling winters or New York City’s dense population — may lie beyond state control, politics already influence levels of pollution. Republican states are less likely to implement policies to reduce emissions or increase energy efficiency.

A recent report by CO2 Scorecard found that this gap in political will contributed to higher carbon emissions in Republican states, even after “controlling for the effects of income, prices, industrial structure, climatic conditions and population density.” Since energy efficiency can lower suppliers’ revenue, the report hypothesizes that a combination of political pressure and concern for the industry’s economic role prevents states from supporting it. These circumstances are likely to breed similar reluctance to cuts to carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants.

However, the proposed regulations tune into — and aim to head off — the challenges raised by the different ways states produce and consume carbon. The EPA’s formula calculates a unique emission-rate standard — a specific ratio of carbon pollution per megawatt-hour of energy produced — for each state. This process accounts for differing abilities to implement efficiency improvements and shift to cleaner energy sources. North Dakota would need to cut the carbon intensity of its electricity production by 10.6 percent, while New York would face a much more ambitious 44.2 percent reduction.

The proposed regulations also give states significant freedom to craft their own roadmaps to reach these targets, by improving the efficiency of existing coal-fired plants; switching to less carbon-intensive energy sources, such as natural gas, wind, or solar; and increasing energy efficiency. States could also join carbon cap-and-trade programs in California and the Northeast, or implement their own carbon tax. By encouraging a range of options that include energy-efficiency measures, the administration heeds the advice of organizations such as the Natural Resources Defense Council, which has argued that considering the electrical system holistically will enable the proposed rules to “achieve steeper cuts at a lower cost.”

Indeed, the economic stakes that complicate carbon reduction also drive some of the most promising approaches to this challenge. The Solutions Project, for instance, examines energy use on a statewide basis, outlining ways to transition each state to a mix of wind, solar, and water power by 2050. While this approach glosses over some of the political and logistical hurdles, it also captures the economic benefits of making the switch. In Wyoming, for example, the Project estimates a move to renewable energy would generate 16,300 construction and 8,300 operation jobs over the next 40 years.

In addition to job growth, reducing carbon pollution improves human health. Emissions from power plants contribute to a variety of public health risks, including heart disease, cancer, stroke, and respiratory illness, leading to 13,000 deaths and $100 billion in health-care costs each year. These considerations have already contributed to the closure of existing power plants in cities like Chicago and Denver. The Obama administration estimates that the proposed reductions in carbon emissions would prevent “6,600 premature deaths, up to 150,000 asthma attacks in children, and up to 490,000 missed work or school days—providing up to $93 billion in climate and public health benefits.”

After a 120-day public comment period, the EPA will revise the proposed regulations, releasing the final standards in June 2015. Whatever shape they take, the attention on existing power plants has the potential to prompt a crucial reckoning of the health, environmental, and economic tradeoffs involved in carbon-intensive energy. The regulations will also test the country’s ability to effect common change across an incredibly varied — and politically polarized — landscape of carbon use.

—–

Political affiliation was determined according to the Cook Political Report’s Partisan Voter Index. Carbon dioxide production data came from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s State CO2 Emissions from Fossil Fuel Combustion. Carbon dioxide consumption data was derived from the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s State-Level Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000-2010.

The maps were made by Peter Hirsch of the Yale Center for Environmental Law & Policy, with inputs from William Miao and Sarah Guy.

—–


Filed under: Article, Business & Technology, Climate & Energy, Politics
Categories: Environment

Coca-Cola HBC Integrated Report for 2013

PR Web - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 08:15

Coca-Cola HBC, ranked among top three beverage companies in the world for sustainability, publishes 2013 Integrated Report

(PRWeb June 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/cchbc/integratedreport2013/prweb11922706.htm

Categories: Environment

EasyTurf Unveils Ultimate Permeable Artificial Grass System at Pomona...

PR Web - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 08:15

EasyTurf is scheduled to showcase their industry leading synthetic turf at thePomona Home and Backyard Show June 20-22 at the Fairplex in Pomona, California.

(PRWeb June 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11883583.htm

Categories: Environment

Southwest Indiana Clearing a Path for Economic Development with help...

PR Web - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 08:15

With the help of the EPA, some forgotten properties in Southwest Indiana are receiving a second chance of becoming beautiful and prosperous again.

(PRWeb June 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11907938.htm

Categories: Environment

Focus Fusion Challenges Big Fusion Power Players

PR Web - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 08:15

Crowdfunding provides a fighting chance at beating the large, government-funded projects in the race for break-even fusion in the next 12 months.

(PRWeb June 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/06/prweb11910973.htm

Categories: Environment

Artist-Animator Donna Kay Lau Successfully Funded “Surf Soup” Ocean...

PR Web - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 08:15

Lau will appear with "Honu" at first annual Hsi Lai Temple Music and Arts Festival.

(PRWeb June 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/Surfsoup/DonnaKayLau/prweb11918277.htm

Categories: Environment

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