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Garland’s New Air and Water Barriers Reduce Air Leakage, Improve...

PR Web - Mon, 04/13/2015 - 09:14

Garland’s new Aero-Perm™ line of permeable air and water barriers control the movement of air through the building envelope, reducing condensation, moisture development and energy loss in the wall...

(PRWeb April 13, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/aero/perm/prweb12647491.htm

Categories: Environment

Deep Blue Scuba & Swim Center Holds Annual Earthy Day Underwater...

PR Web - Mon, 04/13/2015 - 09:14

Deep Blue Scuba & Swim will hold its cleanup beneath the surface April 18th. Above and below the surface, volunteers attend this Earth Day activity.

(PRWeb April 13, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/04/prweb12647578.htm

Categories: Environment

Vitamins aren’t miracle cures — and that’s just fine

Grist.org - Mon, 04/13/2015 - 09:09

When she started working on her book Vitamania, Catherine Price thought she was just going to be writing about the science of vitamins. But it turned out that history of that science also told the story of our obsession with perfecting nutrition. It’s a tale that everyone should know — especially those interested in shifting the American diet to something that’s healthier and more environmentally sustainable.

A disclosure here: I’m friends with Price, a science writer. But I’m not the only one who likes her book; The New York Times called it an “absorbing and meticulously researched history.” Price and I chatted recently about the limits of our understanding of vitamins — and how accepting that ignorance can actually help us to kick the miracle-cure habit and just make better decisions.

Q. You hear a lot these days that natural foods are better, that nutrients are lost in food processing — historically, has that been true? 

A. Well, vitamins tend to be sensitive to the processes that stabilize foods. You can destroy a lot of the vitamins when you process with high heat, or remove them in milling. For instance, the nutritional disease beri beri became a problem in the 1870s when you had new milling technology to get the husk of the rice off. That provided white rice, which people seem to prefer, but the husk actually has a lot of nutrients, including thiamin, and other vitamins and unstable oils that are probably good for us. You were left with a very purified product that then ended up giving people deficiency diseases.

But I think that we can go a little too far in thinking that things that are “natural” are better, or that if you ever eat a cracker you are going to give yourself some horrible deficiency disease.

Q. In terms of high heat: I know vitamin C is destroyed in pasteurization. Is that what you are talking about?

A. Vitamin C is destroyed by like, everything, so that’s a tough one. One thing that comes to mind is breakfast cereal. If you want strange shapes — Froot Loops, Apple Jacks, and all that — you have to start with really refined grain. So you have finely ground grain, and sugar, and then water or something that makes it like slurry. One of the techniques they use is called extrusion, which allows you to make all these little shapes. But it’s very intense both in terms of pressure and heat. Different vitamins are sensitive to different things — some are sensitive to heat, some are sensitive to oxygen, some are sensitive to light — and they break down along the way. You can add vitamins back in, but you have to be careful that those aren’t also destroyed, so they’ll often spray them on at the very end.

If you are eating your cereal for the vitamins — which, I think a lot of us, oddly, do, we’re so convinced cereal is good for us — you should really drink the milk, because a lot of the vitamins come off.

Q. One of my favorite parts of the book was all these really awful descriptions of nutrient deficiency diseases — and the thing that struck me was that these things were once mysteries. They didn’t know if they were being caused by a virus or demonic possession, or what — it took a long time to pin down the association with food. And when people would found the vitamin cure for scurvy, or beri beri, or pellagra, they went back to acting like we had nutrition totally figured out. So I’m wondering, what’s the chance that people are currently suffering from some sort of chronic nutrient deficiency? Are there chemicals out there that keep us healthy that we don’t know about?

A. It’s an interesting question because in the cases of those deficiency diseases that you mentioned, they are so dramatic: You’ll die without the vitamins. So once people got their minds around the concept of nutritional deficiency diseases, that led to the discovery of vitamins. It took a really long time to even think of the concept of a disease caused by something absent from food. Once they figured that out, the changes were so dramatic that we know for sure that scurvy is caused by vitamin C deficiency, and night blindness by [lack of] vitamin A.

It is interesting to wonder what the long term effects of our diet are. We do see type 2 diabetes and certain kinds of cancer associated with western diets. Is that because we are deficient in something? Or is that because we are eating too much of detrimental things? I don’t know if anyone fully knows the answer to that.

Q. It’s like, we’ve figured out all the nutrients needed to survive and reproduce — as you say, the dramatic stuff — but there could be chemicals, that we don’t know about, that make us healthier, or chemicals that, in excess, hurt us. And it seems like we need a new science, or framework, for figuring that out, because it’s just so complicated, and contingent on so many different things.

A. I guess so — if we really wanted to get to all the details. At the same time, it seems so obvious that what we are eating in America is not doing good things for us. So it’s kind of funny when we are asking, is this phytochemical — say, resveratrol — going to prevent whatever the latest thing is that resveratrol’s supposed to prevent? Just take a step back. If you eat crap, like a lot of us are doing, it causes health problems: obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular problems, whatever. So instead of obsessing over lycopene in a bottle of ketchup, why don’t we step away from the ketchup and eat a tomato? I don’t know that we, the public, need to understand the details to improve our health.

Q. That was another really interesting thing I learned from your book: There’s this long history of people, often legitimate scientists, who would take some little detail of evidence and push it to its breaking point, and become highly successful health gurus.

A. We just have such a desire for firm answers and magic bullets. Anytime anyone comes along with what seems like certainty, it’s really compelling. I’ve listened to a lot of talk radio in the last few weeks while waiting to do interviews for this book, and there are so many ads for super beta prostate or whatever, hawking products and promising certainty. It’s so appealing! It makes everything sound so easy! We’ll always be attracted to gurus because we want easy answers, and that’s exactly what they sell.

Q. There is a tremendous yen for nutritional certainty. Now that you’ve written a book on it, has it changed your way of dealing with the uncertainty of nutrition science in your own life?

A. I think so. Discovering the very basic things about vitamins that we still don’t know was at first terrifying, because I was supposed to be writing a book about them. But once I took a step back I realized that was a really important lesson to take away for nutrition as a whole.

If we don’t know all the details for something as prominent as a vitamin, how could we ever think that we’ve figured everything out about nutrition? Vitamins, in terms of their connection with deficiency diseases, have a straightforward cause and effect. But all these other thousands of chemicals in food seem to be much more subtle in how they work and have many synergies with each other we don’t understand. It made me see how hubristic it was to think we could figure that out.

But in a practical sense, maybe that’s not such a big deal from a consumer’s perspective, because we do know enough to have a sense of what is good for us. Instead of seeming boring and fuzzy, accepting uncertainty started to feel really interesting and scientific.


Filed under: Article, Food, Living
Categories: Environment

Tips For Renovation Financing Options

PR Web - Mon, 04/13/2015 - 06:14

The Federal Savings Bank offers a few tips on finding financing options to renovate a home.

(PRWeb April 12, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/04/prweb12648051.htm

Categories: Environment

Author Stephan Luccas targets wider audience for 2014 book

PR Web - Mon, 04/13/2015 - 06:14

‘Living through Their Dreams’ follows woman’s journey from self-doubt to confidence.

(PRWeb April 12, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/StephanLuccas/LivingthroughTheirDreams/prweb12647973.htm

Categories: Environment

Leigh Clarke pursues new marketing push for 2013 novel

PR Web - Mon, 04/13/2015 - 06:14

‘Puzzle of Suspects’ receives fresh press, marketing materials to reach wider audience.

(PRWeb April 12, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/LeighClarke/PuzzleofSuspects/prweb12647982.htm

Categories: Environment

Debbie Durkin's RockNRolla Ecoluxe Lounge

PR Web - Sun, 04/12/2015 - 21:10

Durkin Entertainment Celebrates Movie Awards & Music Festival

(PRWeb April 12, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/04/prweb12646976.htm

Categories: Environment

The One That Didn't Get Away…Arrow Waterfront Properties in...

PR Web - Sun, 04/12/2015 - 21:10

With fourteen pound trout common, derby anticipated to be a success for the avid sport fishers.

(PRWeb April 12, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/04/prweb12624125.htm

Categories: Environment

Beneath the tar sands is even dirtier oil, and industry is salivating over it

Grist.org - Sun, 04/12/2015 - 15:56

The price of crude oil has slumped to its lowest point in six years, and that has sent some major oil companies scrambling to get out of expensive tar-sands projects in Alberta, Canada. Shell has pulled out of one of its largest lease applications, and Petrochina is attempting to get rid of its tar-sands assets. Environmentalists have watched the slowdown with great hope.

Yet at the same time, some of those very same companies are positioning themselves to tap into an even more dirty and expensive kind of oil in Alberta: bitumen carbonates.

The little-known bitumen carbonates are a far more difficult-to-mine, more unconventional form of the molasses-like bitumen that’s already being extracted from the tar sands. In Alberta, the carbonates are in a deposit called the Grosmont formation, and most of it is underneath the tar sands themselves. The bitumen soaking the surface-level tar sands was once pushed up through the layers of limestone and dolomite that comprise the carbonates, and much of that bitumen is still trapped within the layer of porous rock. The carbonate rock resembles Swiss cheese, and in images of samples, black bitumen oozes from its holes. The Grosmont is estimated to contain about 500 billion barrels of oil, three times as much as the proven reserves in the tar sands above it. Industry insiders have a tendency to mention it in the same breath as Saudi Arabia’s mammoth Ghawar oilfield.

Shell, Husky, tar-sands giant Suncor, and the dreaded Koch brothers have all snapped up leases in Alberta’s bitumen carbonates. In mid-March, the mineral rights for a portion of carbonates were sold at auction for three-and-a-half times the average price for such leases, indicating great confidence in their profit-making potential, if not in the short term, then in the long term.

Despite decades of attempts, though, no one has yet found a way to profitably mine them. Looking at pictures of the oil-filled rock, it’s easy to imagine why these deposits are hard to mine. As in the tar sands, the bitumen in the carbonates is almost solid, meaning it has to be mixed with regular light crude and other solvents just to be made liquid enough to move through a pipeline (this mixture is that infamous “dilbit,” or diluted bitumen). So, this oil needs more oil just in order to be transported elsewhere. In addition to that, the dolomite’s fissures and holes (called “vugs” in geological parlance) are so uneven and unpredictable that companies haven’t figured out how to send drilling equipment through it: some holes are so large that they could swallow a drill.

One pilot project has successfully pumped oil from the bitumen carbonates. A joint effort by Osum Oil Sands and Laricina Energy, the so-called Saleski project mined more than 430,000 barrels of oil between 2011 and 2014 using a technique called steam-assisted gravity drainage, or SAGD. The technique is already used to extract tar sands that are too deep to be strip-mined: It pumps hot steam deep into the tar sands, melting and diluting the bitumen and applying pressure to push the tarry petroleum up to the surface. The oil industry is fond of comparing SAGD to traditional oil wells, but in fact the process is even more carbon-intensive than the ugly strip-mining that has already razed so much of Alberta’s boreal forest. Not to mention that the steam required to melt, dilute, and pump that bitumen requires the use of a tremendous volume of fresh water from a river and ecosystem that are already at risk from the tar sands industry’s rapacious use of their water.

The pilot project was lauded as a success, but it was suspended in December because of falling oil prices. Laricina is now in such rough financial shape that it was just granted court protection from its creditors, so it’s unclear when or whether its finances will recover enough for it to resume bitumen carbonates mining.

Other corporations are highly secretive about their research and activity around bitumen carbonates — the winner of last month’s auction was a third-party shell corporation, used to mask the identity of the buyer — so it’s unclear how close any company is to figuring out how to mine the carbonates for a profit (even assuming oil prices go back up). However, the high auction bids, secrecy, bullish predictions in industry magazines, and billions already invested all indicate that the oil industry is eyeing the carbonates with great greed.

Here is what’s most frightening: The massive amount of oil contained in the tar sands has already transformed Canada into the world’s third-largest producer of oil, after Saudi Arabia and Venezuela. Extraction from the tar sands is projected to double in size over the next 15 years, even without including any development of the bitumen carbonates. Should the carbonates truly become the new frontier of unconventional oil, the massive size of the Grosmont formation could make Canada the No. 1 producer of oil in the world — and all of that oil would come in the form of unconventional, sticky bitumen that can only be tapped through processes that emit far more climate-warming gases than traditional oil drilling.

The stratospheric numbers thrown around by excited industry insiders should galvanize anyone already familiar with climate scientist James Hansen’s warning from back in 2012, telling us that full development of the tar sands would mean “game over for the climate.” What would he say about these tar sands 2.0, the bitumen carbonates?


Filed under: Business & Technology, Climate & Energy
Categories: Environment

Barrier Plastics and Consolidated Container Company Announce Strategic...

PR Web - Sun, 04/12/2015 - 09:09

Consolidated Container Company becomes principal US manufacturer of rigid thin walled Baritainer® HDPE plastic bottles

(PRWeb April 12, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/04/prweb12647092.htm

Categories: Environment

Engaging Science and Advocacy for Autism Awareness and Action at...

PR Web - Sun, 04/12/2015 - 09:09

Previous AutismOne keynote speaker Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., addresses rally in Sacramento, CA; 2015 keynotes continue the conversation

(PRWeb April 12, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/04/prweb12647331.htm

Categories: Environment

ProOne Introduces Revolutionary Pipe On Pipe Treatment - CoilPro

PR Web - Sun, 04/12/2015 - 09:09

Specifically designed for Coil Tubing applications, ProOne has released another weapon that drills all plugs and provides pipe-on-pipe protection and performance...CoilPro

(PRWeb April 12, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/04/prweb12638585.htm

Categories: Environment

Ecotourism Expert and Greenloons.com Founder, Irene Lane, Scheduled to...

PR Web - Sun, 04/12/2015 - 09:09

Lane Will Present Return on Investment (ROI) Financial Model Pilot Study Results for the Irish Sustainable Tourism Industry Suggesting the Model's Applicability In Other Regions That Want to...

(PRWeb April 12, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/Greenloons2015/ROISustainableTourism/prweb12641679.htm

Categories: Environment

Thrift Books awarded Google Trusted Store badge

PR Web - Sun, 04/12/2015 - 09:09

Google awards Thrift Books with Trusted Store status, recognizing their reliability and proven track record of providing quality used books at affordable prices to customers all around the world.

(PRWeb April 12, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/04/prweb12646390.htm

Categories: Environment

Announcing Debut Novel “Orphan Moon” – A Heart-wrenching Saga of the...

PR Web - Sun, 04/12/2015 - 09:09

“Orphan Moon,” the debut novel by T. K. Lukas, is a historical fiction narrative about a young woman in 1860’s Texas who must...

(PRWeb April 12, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/04/prweb12647031.htm

Categories: Environment

Current Low Rates Give Advantage to Using a VA Loan for...

PR Web - Sun, 04/12/2015 - 00:07

The Federal Savings Bank highlights the advantages of a VA loan for energy-efficient home upgrades, especially since interest rates are low now.

(PRWeb April 11, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/04/prweb12647365.htm

Categories: Environment

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