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Frontier Co-op: New Name, Same Values

PR Web - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 15:08

Frontier Natural Products Co-Op Is Now Frontier Co-Op

(PRWeb July 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12008025.htm

Categories: Environment

Great Sales Promotion Activity at Fecbek.com

PR Web - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 15:08

Recently, Fecbek.com, a well-known clothing manufacturer and retailer, proudly announces its new category of service to public--- Promotion at...

(PRWeb July 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12008561.htm

Categories: Environment

Shipment In 24 Hours Just Announced By Fecbek.com

PR Web - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 15:08

Recently, Fecbek.com has proudly announced its new type of service to public - Shipment in 24 hours.

(PRWeb July 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12008566.htm

Categories: Environment

Global Phthalic Anhydride Market Analysis by Application (Phthalate...

PR Web - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 15:08

Market Size -$ 6.70 bn in 2013, Market Growth - CAGR of 5.8%, Market Trends – increasing demand in Asia Pacific new report by Grand View Research. View full report with TOC -...

(PRWeb July 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/Phthalic_Anhydride_Market/Market_Share_Size_Trends/prweb12008737.htm

Categories: Environment

Anonymous Author Tells Story of a Hermaphrodite in an Ultrasexualized...

PR Web - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 15:08

Author announces release of ‘Double Lover.’

(PRWeb July 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/Anonymous/DoubleLover/prweb12005438.htm

Categories: Environment

$75,000 Worth of DaVinci Roofscapes Tiles Available in The Great TOH...

PR Web - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 15:08

DaVinci Roofscapes is offering $75,000 worth of Bellaforte polymer roofing tiles as prizes in the 2014 The Great TOH Giveaway. The sweepstakes launches in August issue of This Old House magazine, on...

(PRWeb July 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12007038.htm

Categories: Environment

Book Publishing in Canada Industry Market Research Report Now...

PR Web - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 15:08

The Book Publishing industry experienced considerable declines during the five years to 2014 due to decreasing leisure time and weak growth in disposable income, and going forward, IBISWorld estimates...

(PRWeb July 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12007854.htm

Categories: Environment

WebsiteClosers.com Now Offers Business Owners No Cost Seller...

PR Web - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 15:08

WebsiteClosers.com offers free seller consultations to those that are interested in an exit strategy for their business.

(PRWeb July 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/websiteclosers-com/seller-consultations/prweb12008263.htm

Categories: Environment

Storage Sheds Outlet Announces the Availability of a Wide Range of...

PR Web - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 15:08

Storage Sheds Outlet now announces the availability of a wide range of cheap storage shed. They offer affordable storage sheds without compromising on quality.

(PRWeb July 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/storage-sheds-outletcom/economical-storage-shed/prweb12008276.htm

Categories: Environment

FRC Systems Opens New Headquarters in North Metro-Atlanta

PR Web - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 15:08

Industrial Wastewater Treatment Systems Designer Expands Office and Manufacturing Space

(PRWeb July 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12004514.htm

Categories: Environment

Forget potato salad — fund this science project and help cure the climate

Grist.org - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 14:01

Azolla, otherwise known as duckweed, is a tiny aquatic fern with a secret superpower: It can turn nitrogen from the air into plant food.

Actually, azolla can’t do this on its own. It relies on symbiotic bacteria tenants who do the real work of ‘fixing’ the atmospheric nitrogen into a more plant-accessible form. As a result of this tasty talent, azolla can also double its biomass every few days, sequestering large amounts of carbon all the while.

So no wonder a group of researchers at Duke University want you to pitch in to help them sequence the fern’s genome, as well as the genomes of all the little microbes who give the plant its edge. Understanding the mechanics behind azolla’s magic power may help farmers move away from artificial fertilizers and the pollution associated with them — Asian rice farmers were planting the stuff alongside their crops 1,500 years ago.

There’s another reason lead researcher Kathleen Pryer thinks you should pony up for a plant: It might be global warming Kryptonite. About 49 million years ago, atmospheric carbon dropped by 80 percent, along with the Earth’s temperatures; the surface temperature in the Arctic went from a balmy 48 degrees F to a mere 8 degrees. Meanwhile, azolla was going gangbusters, sucking up carbon like Daniel Day-Lewis with a straw, then bring its stored hordes to the briny deep when it died.

Pryer thinks this is more than a coincidence. It’s possible that the little fern could have pulled up enough CO2 in a mere 800,000 years to essentially geoengineer the planet. And while we don’t really have 800,000 years to wait for flora to fix ALL our problems this time around, every little bit helps, right? Good. The funding page is open for just ONE MORE DAY.

A notch above a swimming pool’s worth of potato salad, yes?


Filed under: Business & Technology, Climate & Energy
Categories: Environment

Take back the streets, ladies — two wheels at a time

Grist.org - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 13:00

I don’t bike. There’s no real reason for that beyond the fact that I’m not very coordinated, and I feel like I fall off a bicycle every time I get on one. (Block Island, 2011: Attempted to bike up a minor incline, fell over within two wheel rotations. Mendoza, 2009: Crashed into a ditch on the side of the highway, lost 200 pesos that fell out of my pocket, cried.) Personally, I’ve always felt more comfortable getting around on two feet than two wheels, even if it takes twice — or thrice — as long to get anywhere.

But in my social circle, I’m absolutely in the minority — in fact, I’m regularly surrounded by (braver) women who love riding bikes for the pure freedom it allows them, and swear that there’s no better way of getting around. Both environmentally and economically speaking, it’s hard to beat — especially for city-dwellers.

But as with anything that women do in public spaces, the simple act of getting on a bike and pedaling down the street opens us up to unwanted comments, sexual advances, and even violence. Because my own velocipedic career is so pathetically limited, I set out to ask others about their experiences of biking as a woman.

This response, from Seattle bicyclist Liz Rush, stood out to me: “Biking and sexual harassment has always been a weird space, because cycle men will absolutely deny that it ever happens (yeah, right) and sometimes it’s so graphic I can’t believe it.”

For anyone who might deny that this kind of harassment exists, here’s what the experience of riding a bike as a woman looks like on a daily basis:

In New York: “I get comments about my legs and ass and men telling me I should ‘ride’ them instead of my bike or that they like to see me sweat. It’s vile and I shudder to think of what women and girls younger than me — I’m 25 — hear from men like that.”

In Philadelphia: “I had my ass slapped by someone in a car driving beside me. I broke their side mirror off at the next intersection.”

In Toronto: “A guy in the passenger seat [of a passing car] grabbed my ass while I was riding my bike. I bet they laughed. I tried to stay on my bike.”

In Washington, D.C.: “I constantly get hassled while locking up my bike. Men saying ‘Mira, Mami, lemme show you how to lock up your bike,’ while grabbing my bike, then calling me a bitch or worse when I ignore them.”

However, almost every woman who wrote in to share an anecdote of sexual harassment also said that her bike helped her build a sense of empowerment and autonomy.

“When it’s late at night or if I’m traveling through an area where I feel less safe, I often choose to ride my bike rather than travel by public transit or on foot,” says Ndangi Ndimbie, who bikes daily in Pittsburgh. “The speed at which I travel on my bike emboldens me. I feel more comfortable zooming past cat-callers, leaving them many yards behind in just a few seconds. That said, my feelings of disgust (sometimes fear) usually stay with me for a few more blocks.”

Like Ndimbie, many women specifically mentioned being able to quickly get away from harassers or attackers as a significant benefit of riding a bike. But — with reason! — they’d also describe how the experience of having to flee from the aggressive men left them shaken and upset. For women who bike, sexual harassment has been normalized as a reality of daily life, but that doesn’t mean that it doesn’t still have the power to frighten or threaten them. Even if it happens every day, coming face to face with a stranger who feels entitled to some level of ownership of your body is terrifying.

“Fundamentally, this is a transportation justice issue, especially when we’re talking about women’s access to bikes,” says Zosia Sztykowski, director of community outreach for the D.C. organization Collective Action for Safe Spaces. “[Biking] is an inexpensive, environmentally friendly, super-accessible way to get around cities, and the more open we can make that, the better for everyone. But [harassment] really does inhibit the way that women move around the city. A lot of them get on the bike in the first place in order to avoid the harassment that they experience while they’re walking. But the more we work on this issue and the more we ask them to come out and tell their stories, the more we’re realizing that that harassment follows them off of the sidewalk.”

But listen closely, and you’ll hear the swelling chorus of biking women around the world saying, “Enough of this bullshit.” It’s the sound of women in many different cities banding together and insisting on better treatment at the hands of strange men. And they’re finding that there’s more strength in numbers than in the most muscled paragon of Hummer-driving machismo you’ve ever had the displeasure of meeting.

Sztykowski has been organizing local workshops for women bikers to empower them to deal with rampant harassment. “In these workshops, we give people some kind of easy tool that they can use when they’re in these situations themselves. We also really emphasize bystander intervention — saying something when you see something happening to another person. And finally, we emphasize working within your community — your friend group, your family, workplace, everywhere — to try to change the culture that makes this behavior okay. Because fundamentally, that is the only approach to stop it.”

I spoke with Rebecca Susman, membership and outreach director for BikePGH, Pittsburgh’s bike advocacy organization, about why she started the organization’s fairly new Women and Biking program. “The impetus for starting the program was that there’s this question out there a lot: ‘What is the right response for women to have to harassment while riding?’ The discussion should be more about why is this happening in the first place — what makes this culturally acceptable? And there isn’t a simple answer.”

The program has hosted a forum and several workshops to bring women of all ages and backgrounds together so that they can share their own experiences of being women bikers.

“I was listening to women tell their stories and just try to grapple with the sexualization of our bodies — how they’re something that other people feel entitled to — and what that means for us,” says Susman of the workshops. “And it was just story after story of harassment and of dealing with it in all different ways. Really, it was very dependent on where they were, and what the situation was, in terms of why they would feel safe or unsafe.”

When I spoke with Hollaback! co-founder Emily May last week about dealing with sexual harassment on public transit, she emphasized the importance of storytelling in helping women come to terms with their own experiences. In that regard, the Women and Biking program has also started a zine night in partnership with the local Carnegie Library. “All the women who attend these workshops create their own [zine] pages to share their own stories of street harassment, of biking in skirts, of why they love to ride – basically, of their lived experiences in a male-dominated culture.”

One of the issues of harassment of women on bikes is that beyond the gendered power dynamics at play, there’s also the clear hierarchy of vehicles in traffic. When a car and a bike crash into each other, which one do you think is more likely to come out unscathed?

“When you really start talking about it, women are still experiencing a different sort of harassment when they’re on their bikes,” says Kate Ziegler, co-director of Hollaback! Boston. “It’s one that has perhaps even a greater physical threat when it’s car vs. bike. We want to look at how that can change the threat that we feel and the transit choices that we make.”

Like Susman and Sztykowski, Ziegler is in the process of organizing educational and community-building workshops. “We really want to have these workshops to continue and support that kind of conversation in the city over the power dynamics in play, and how those two things are not actually different,” she says. “[We're exploring] how street harassment and harassment on bikes is similar, and especially how the intersection of the two can be really alienating and make people feel really vulnerable on the streets.”

With so many of these workshops popping up around the country, I had to ask: Are they really having an impact for the women they’re serving?

“Part of what’s so powerful about bringing women together is realizing that there’s a kind of universal experience that many of us have in riding,” says Susman. “[Organizing our workshops] was a small step in opening the discussion, and a small step towards empowering us to have a voice. That voice needs to be heard in order to create some great change, to create a safe culture for us to be in.”

“And I was just really thrilled to participate,” she adds. “It was one of the best days of my year.”

Thank you to all of the women who wrote in to share their experiences.


Filed under: Cities, Climate & Energy, Living
Categories: Environment

American Farmer to Feature Ag Seeds in Upcoming Episode Airing on...

PR Web - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 12:08

DMG Productions explores the latest innovations in crop production.

(PRWeb July 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb11999476.htm

Categories: Environment

10 Ways to Increase Your Home's Curb Appeal

PR Web - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 12:08

How to add curb appeal to your home. 10 Tips for homeowners, Home maintenance and DIY projects to increase your home's value.

(PRWeb July 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12003675.htm

Categories: Environment

New Bozeman Product the Jelt Belt “Keeps Your Pants On!”

PR Web - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 12:08

The Jelt Belt, a brand new product invented by Jennifer Perry of Bozeman, Montana has created a new way to wear belts and answers why "You Need This." The Jelt is a non-metal belt made from...

(PRWeb July 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12005270.htm

Categories: Environment

Fecbek.com Introduces Its New Category, Daily New, To The Public

PR Web - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 12:08

Recently, Fecbek.com, a leading clothing manufacturer and retailer, has proudly announced its new category to the public - Daily New at...

(PRWeb July 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12008546.htm

Categories: Environment

Fashionable Outdoor Bottoms Are Available At Fecbek.com

PR Web - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 12:08

Today, Fecbek.com, a well-known outdoor bottoms manufacturer and retailer, has proudly launched its new arrivals of outdoor bottoms which are over 160 styles that can be chosen.

(PRWeb July 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12008554.htm

Categories: Environment

New Hypotheses on Influence of Emotions on Water Proposed on Sharon...

PR Web - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 12:08

Water Researcher Gerald Pollack Discusses with Bio Logic Aqua Research Founder Sharon Kleyne How Fourth Phase Water May Explain Dr. Emoto’s Controversial Findings.

(PRWeb July 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12008599.htm

Categories: Environment

Computer Graphics Market Worth $32.68 Billion by 2019 – New Report by...

PR Web - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 12:08

Computer Graphics Market research report majorly focuses on drivers and restraints for the market and identifies the opportunities, challenges and ongoing market trends....

(PRWeb July 10, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/computer-graphics-market/07/prweb12005606.htm

Categories: Environment

Cryptic rapper Lil B drops environmental wisdom. Here are his greatest hits

Grist.org - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 12:02

You may or may not know who Lil B the Based God is. Or, according to his legend, you can know who Lil B is, but you may never know who the Based God is, or you may not want to know, for your own sanity. Some have tried to explain his mystique, but to little resolution.

My buddy Eric Tullis, hip hop expert and music contributor for the alt-weekly Indy Week, calls Lil B “an accidental eclectic who’s made a career out of being an idiot savant rapper.” He’s revealed so much on his Myspace, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, and Youtube pages, and yet we know so little. The little we know:

  • He was or is part of the Bay Area rap group “The Pack,” popularly known for their hip hop ode to Vans footwear.
  • It seems that he has a mouth full of gold teeth.
  • He appears to have a large, faithful following as a solo rapper based purely on social networks.
  • His Youtube music video hits reach into the millions, named after Ellen DeGeneres (4.8 million+ views to date).
  • He’s been in a number of high-profile Twitter feuds with badass rappers like Joe Budden and Joey Bada$$.
  • He’s also involved in a long-standing feud with NBA MVP Kevin Durant (a guide to which you can read about in Grantland.)
  • He’s a motivational speaker who once gave a lecture at NYU.
  • He’s a misogynist.

And his latest reveal: He’s an environmentalist.

Yes, if the messages he’s sent out over the last three weeks from his Twitter and Instagram accounts can be believed, he is the next coming of Van Jones. Behold:

He gets climate change and has probably already saved the polar bears.

Not only that, but he knows who’s most responsible for climate change and is not afraid to name them.

He’s anti-oil and an advocate for the victims of environmental injustices.

… As are his well-informed followers

He understands climate storm mitigation and disaster preparedness.

He’s a locavore.

He’s also a food justice advocate.

He’s a conservationist of food, water, energy and … general things to conserve.

He believes in solar power.

He probably saw Blackfish.

He believes in animal rights, but more importantly, animals believe in him.

He defies the stereotype that black people are afraid of the outdoors.


Filed under: Cities, Climate & Energy, Living
Categories: Environment

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