Hualapai Indian Reservation Aid Project

General Topics: 

On the weekend of September 15 and 16, Miles Standish visited the Hualapai Indian Reservation to deliver six complete computers and a large quantity of blankets, winter coats, jackets and sweaters for the needy.  The Reservation is in the western portion of the south rim of the Grand Canyon.  Donated by members of the Verde Valley Computer Club based in Cottonwood, Arizona, the computers will provide an educational experience as well as pleasure for high school students age 14 to 16 who can not afford to buy computers. Miles refurbished the computers with some new parts and an up-to-date operating system.

Miles met with some of the students and parents at the Hualapai Lodge in Peach Springs, AZ which is in the southern portion of the Reservation.  Readers may be interested in a partial statement of faith concerning the Hualapai, given on a greetings card for the Lodge: “Hualapai people believe that their Creator made the earth and all elements in it as relative beings.  Therefore, it is believed that the land, waters, plants, rocks, birds, animals, reptiles, air, fire, rain and so forth have life forces and energies.  Hualapai prayers reflect respect for all these aspects in the natural world.”

Although not all were able to be present, the accompanying photo shows some of the students and parents. The lady on the far right is Maria Rocha, who is our contact on the Reservation.  The others, left to right, are Collette Quasula and her daughter Jaylene (these are family members of Rochone Quasula who will receive a computer, but could not be present), Andrea Nieto, age 16, recipient of a computer, Karen Dashee, mother of Andrea, and Shaneta Tom-Bender, age 15, recipient of a compter.  Maria Rocha will give the remaining computers to other students.

Miles expects to make more visits to help the students learn to use the computers.

Refurbishing computers costs about $50 each for new parts, and of course, the need varies widely.  Sometimes it's for a new hard drive, sometimes more memory, etc.  Where feasible, the computers are being loaded with a Linux operating system, which is free.  This effort is expected to spread to other Indian reservations in the American Southwest.  If you would like to contribute to this project, you may do so by check or online (see "Donate" button in Content Menu on left).  If donating by check, use the memo block.